Now BATting: A New Treatment Approach That Uses Testosterone First, Then ADT


Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has long been a mainstay in the management of prostate cancer. Indeed, the vast majority of prostate cancers depend on androgens (hormones like testosterone) for their growth. Lowering testosterone levels with ADT is a reasonable approach. But it comes with two sets of problems. Continue reading…


Super Patient: Wade Hayes Beats Stage IV Colon Cancer—Twice


Country musician Wade Hayes had no idea he had colon cancer until it was almost too late. He’d had telltale signs: bleeding and lethargy—which is caused by anemia due to blood loss—for a couple of years. But these symptoms began when he was only 40 years old, a decade younger than when initial colon cancer screening is recommended. And he had no family history of the disease. Taking all of this into account, a doctor friend attributed Wade’s bleeding to his heavy weightlifting. Continue reading…


Drugs Home in on Bone Metastases in Prostate Cancer


Bone metastases are common in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). They are associated with increased risk of death due to a number of complications such as bone fractures, compression of the spinal cord, and pain. Radiation of the affected bone sites is used as a palliative measure to relieve pain. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has also approved certain drugs for treatment of bone metastases in CRPC including the following: Continue reading…


Not So Simple: Why PSA Screening Needs to Change


First, a little history: the protein PSA (prostate-specific antigen) was discovered in 1970 by Richard Ablin, PhD, while searching for a way to detect prostate cancer. He determined that PSA is indeed found in most prostate cancers, but is also present in healthy prostate glands, and is therefore not useful for diagnosing the disease. However, he did find that rising levels of PSA may signal a return of cancer in patients who were treated for prostate cancer, but relapsed. Continue reading…


Super Patient: Cancer Commons Helps Francesca Keep Fighting Pancreatic Cancer


Update:  We are deeply saddened to report that Francesca passed away on October 31, 2014. Her warmth, intelligence, and bravery will continue to inspire us. It is a privilege to share her story and keep her memory alive.

In 2011, Francesca knew something was wrong. Her stomach hurt and was upset after eating, and she just didn’t feel right. She had also lost a lot of weight, but thought that was normal, considering her life at the time. “I was working fulltime and had just stopped breastfeeding,” she explains. So when she went in for a checkup, she expected to hear it was a stomach problem. Continue reading…


ASCO 2014 — Takeaways for Prostate Cancer Patients


Every year, thousands of people gather for the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. This year’s meeting took place in Chicago, Illinois. Here are some of the most notable new developments in prostate cancer treatment presented at ASCO 2014: Continue reading…


Androgen Deprivation Therapy—To Wait, or Not to Wait?


Every year, tens of thousands of patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer are treated with some form of radiation therapy to kill cancer cells or with surgery to remove the cancerous prostate gland. After these invasive treatments, patients are monitored for disease progression with various tests, such as imaging (scans) and regular measurements of a protein called prostate-specific androgen (PSA) in the blood. Unfortunately, many patients find themselves in an ambiguous situation: their PSA levels are rising, but imaging tests fail to detect a return of their cancer. Continue reading…


Aggressive Prostate Cancer Makes Use of Bad Cholesterol


For many years it has been known that cancer cells store and use fat molecules differently from the way normal cells do. Fat molecules, also called lipids, tend to accumulate in so-called lipid droplets within cells. These droplets can be seen under a microscope with special staining methods, but the precise mixture of the different kinds of lipids in an individual cell is difficult to analyze. Now, researchers have developed a new imaging technique called Raman spectromicroscopy, which allows for detailed analysis of lipids on a single-cell level. Continue reading…


Novartis Revolutionizes Clinical Trials for Targeted Cancer Drugs


Someone had to do it; now it looks like Novartis may be the first. The pharma company’s new series of clinical trials, SIGNATURE (also known as, ‘bring the protocol to the patient,’ or  ‘P2P’), is recruiting patients with different cancers to receive investigational targeted drugs selected to match the distinct genetic changes found in each patient’s tumor. Continue reading…