Breast-Cancer Death Rate Drops Almost 40 Percent, Saving 322,000 Lives, Study Says

Excerpt:

“Breast cancer death rates declined almost 40 percent between 1989 and 2015, averting 322,600 deaths, the American Cancer Society reportedTuesday.

“Breast cancer death rates increased by 0.4 percent per year from 1975 to 1989, according to the study. After that, mortality rates decreased rapidly, for a 39 percent drop overall through 2015.  The report, the latest to document a long-term reduction in breast-cancer mortality, attributed the declines to both improvements in treatments and to early detection by mammography.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


New Targeted Alpha Therapy Protocol for Advanced Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Therapy options are limited for men with advanced-stage, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), but a new treatment protocol offers hope. In the featured article of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine‘s October issue, German researchers report on their recent clinical experience, which establishes a dosing regimen for actinium-225 (225Ac)-labeled targeted alpha therapy of patients with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-positive tumors. The protocol balances treatment response with toxicity concerns to provide the most effective therapy with the least side effects.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


New System Finds and Targets Vulnerabilities in Lung Cancer Cells

Excerpt:

“Genetic changes that help lung cancer thrive also make it vulnerable to a promising experimental drug, according to a study led by researchers from Perlmutter Cancer at NYU Langone Health, and published online October 2 in Nature Medicine.

“Specifically, the study found that mutations in the DNA code for the gene KEAP1 help lung adenocarcinoma  counter a process called oxidative stress, in which molecules known as reactive oxygen species (ROS) are created as a side effect of ‘burning’ fuel to make energy. Cancer cells need extra fuel to support abnormal growth, produce more ROS, and depend more for survival on naturally occurring antioxidants that keep ROS from damaging cell parts.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


DNA Mutations Shed in Blood Predicts Response to Immunotherapy in Patients With Cancer

Excerpt:

“In a first-of-its-kind study, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that a blood sample, or liquid biopsy, can reveal which patients will respond to checkpoint inhibitor-based immunotherapies.

” ‘We can help predict response to immunotherapy by measuring the number of mutations in circulating tumor DNA using a simple blood test,’ said Yulian Khagi, MD, UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center fellow and first author. ‘Immunotherapy can result in serious side effects, and therefore being able to predict who will respond is important to mitigating potential risk to each patient.’ ”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


PSMA-PET Agents Poised to Advance Imaging in Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Imaging agents for the detection of biochemical recurrent prostate cancer could move beyond computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the near future, with the emergence of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-PET, particularly in oligometastatic disease, with a high-detection sensitivity rate, explains Thomas Hope, MD.

“PSMA-PET uses small molecules that bind to PSMA, localizes a prostate cancer tumor, and allows radiologists to image patients after 1 hour to detect small sites of disease. Hope and researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) are dedicated to bringing this imaging modality to the FDA for approval with diagnostic data as evidence.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


FDA Approves Verzenio for Hormone Receptor-Positive, HER-2-Negative Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“The FDA approved abemaciclib for the treatment of women with hormone receptor-positive HER-2-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer who progressed following endocrine therapy.

The agency approved abemaciclib (Verzenio, Eli Lilly) — an investigational cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor —in combination with fulvestrant (Faslodex, AstraZeneca) following progression on endocrine therapy, and as a monotherapy for patients with metastatic disease previously treated with endocrine therapy and chemotherapy.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Study Splits Incurable Childhood Brain Tumors Into 10 New Diseases

Excerpt:

“Scientists have found that deadly childhood brain tumours are actually 10 different diseases that should each be diagnosed and treated based on their specific genetic faults.

“The major new study has important implications for treatment, since personalising care for each type of   is likely to be much more effective than grouping them all together as one.

“A team at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, found stark differences among ‘s ‘high grade’ , or gliomas, and that they could be split into at least 10 different cancers.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Combination of Optune® with Temozolomide Demonstrates Unprecedented Five-Year Survival for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Patients

Excerpt:

“Novocure (NVCR) announced today results from its phase 3 pivotal EF-14 trial adding Optune to temozolomide for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM), including results from health-related quality of life analyses, were presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s (ASTRO) 2017 Annual Meeting in San Diego. This marks the first presentation of EF-14 five-year survival and quality of life data at a radiation oncology conference.

“A late-breaking oral presentation focused on Novocure’s EF-14 phase 3 pivotal trial, which demonstrated unprecedented five-year survival results in newly diagnosed GBM. Patients treated with Optune in combination with temozolomide experienced a significant extension of overall survival without added toxicity compared to patients treated with temozolomide alone. The data also showed that Optune-treated patients were able to maintain quality of life for longer compared to patients treated with temozolomide alone.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


In Breast Cancer, a Victory for Common Sense

Excerpt:

“New 10-year results from a major clinical trial in breast cancer confirm that it does not compromise overall survival to leave behind minimal amounts of cancer that have spread to the underarm lymph nodes in certain patients, according to the investigators.

“The long-term data are from the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Z0011 trial and were published online September 12 in JAMA.

“The study participants were women with clinical T1 or T2 invasive breast cancer, no palpable axillary nodes, and 1 or 2 sentinel lymph nodes containing metastases. In addition to lymph node management, all patients were treated with lumpectomy, tangential whole-breast irradiation, and adjuvant systemic therapy.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.