Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Stress Drugs Taken Before Surgery May Reduce Metastatic Recurrence

Excerpt:

“Most cancer-related deaths are the result of post-surgical metastatic recurrence. In metastasis, cells of primary tumors travel to other parts of the body, where they often proliferate into inoperable, ultimately fatal growths.

“A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a specific drug regimen administered prior to and after surgery significantly reduces the risk of post-surgical cancer recurrence. These medications, a combination of a beta blocker (which relieves stress and high blood pressure) and an anti-inflammatory, may also improve the long-term survival rates of patients. The treatment is safe, inexpensive—two medications similar in price to aspirin—and easily administered to patients without contraindications.”

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Software Helps Men With Prostate Cancer Choose the Right Treatments

Excerpt:

“Like many men diagnosed with prostate cancer, Bill Pickett faced a tough question when he came to UCLA for treatment: how to fight it?

“Prostate  is one of the more curable cancers—it has a 96 percent survival rate 15 years after diagnosis, according to the American Cancer Society. The options men have after a diagnosis have different side effects and trade-offs. So choosing, for example, between radiation therapy or surgery, can be complicated for a person.”

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FDA Grants Genentech’s Alecensa Priority Review for Initial Treatment of People with ALK-Positive Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company’s supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) and granted Priority Review for Alecensa® (alectinib) as an initial (first-line) treatment for people with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive, locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as detected by an FDA-approved test. The FDA will make a decision on approval by November 30, 2017.

” ‘Phase III results showed Alecensa reduced the risk of disease worsening by more than half compared to the current standard of care and lowered the risk of tumors spreading to or growing in the brain by more than 80 percent,’ said Sandra Horning, M.D., chief medical officer and head of Global Product Development. ‘We are working closely with the FDA to bring this medicine as an initial treatment for people with ALK-positive NSCLC as soon as possible.’ ”

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Testing for Immune ‘Hotspots’ Can Predict Risk That Breast Cancer Will Return

Excerpt:

“Scientists have developed a new test that can pick out women at high risk of relapsing from breast cancer within 10 years of diagnosis.

“Their study looked for immune cell ‘hotspots’ in and around tumours, and found that women who had a high number of hotspots were more likely to relapse than those with lower numbers.

“The new test could help more accurately assess the risk of cancer returning in individual patients, and offer them monitoring or preventative treatment.”

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Targeted Radiotherapy Limits Side Effects of Breast Cancer Treatment

Excerpt:

“Breast cancer patients who have radiotherapy targeted at the original tumour site experience fewer side effects five years after treatment than those who have whole breast radiotherapy, and their cancer is just as unlikely to return, according to trial results published* in The Lancet (link is external) today (Wednesday).

“The Cancer Research UK-funded IMPORT LOW trial** revealed that five years after treatment, almost all patients were disease free.***

“The researchers at 30 radiotherapy centres across the UK, led by The Institute of Cancer Research, London(link is external), and the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Centre(link is external), studied more than 2,000 women aged 50 or over who had early stage breast cancer that was at a low risk of coming back.”

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New Online Navigator Helps Patients and Doctors Access Experimental Treatments

Excerpt:

“When approved therapies don’t work, or stop working, for people with serious or life-threatening illnesses, it puts them in a difficult position. Some turn to clinical trials that are testing experimental treatments. But many can’t do that because they are too sick, don’t meet the requirements of the trial, or can’t afford to travel to the site of a trial. That doesn’t mean they are out of options.”

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Proton Tx Plus Chemo Seen Beneficial in NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The use of proton beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy may improve clinical outcomes for patients with inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), while reducing the toxic effects of treatment, researchers from MD Anderson Cancer Center have found.

“The researchers, led by Joe Y. Chang, MD, PhD, reported that the median overall survival of 26.5 months observed in their study ‘was encouraging, and in accord with our original statistical goal of 24 months.’ ”

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Immune Checkpoint Agents Advance in Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“With the prospect of phase III data that could confirm their efficacy, checkpoint inhibitors against PD-1 and PD-L1 have shown promise, both as monotherapies and in combination with chemotherapy for patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), Sylvia Adams, MD, said during a presentation at the 16th Annual International Congress on the Future of Breast Cancer East.

” ‘We think there is definitely value for immune checkpoint blockade in triple-negative disease. When you look at the metastatic trials, while the response rates are relatively low, most of the responses are durable,’ said Adams, from the NYU Langone Medical Center. ‘For patient selection, it is important to consider the line of therapy. The earlier the better.’ ”

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Infection Is Most Common Complication of Prostate Biopsy

Excerpt:

“The most common complication of prostate biopsy is infection, with mild bleeding also reported, according to an update of the American Urological Association White Paper published in the August issue of The Journal of Urology.

“Michael A. Liss, M.D., from the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, and colleagues conducted a literature review to examine the prevalence and prevention of common complications of prostate  . They focused on , bleeding, urinary retention, needle tract seeding, and erectile dysfunction in 346 articles identified for full text review and 119 articles that were included in the final data synthesis.”

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