Tucatinib Active in Heavily Pretreated HER2+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Tucatinib used in combination with capecitabine, trastuzumab (Herceptin), or both agents showed promising antitumor activity in heavily pretreated women with HER2-positive breast cancer with or without brain metastases, according to findings published in The Lancet Oncology.

“In phase Ib results from a nonrandomized, open-label study, 83% (5/6) of patients with measurable disease treated with tucatinib/capecitabine had an objective response, as did 40% (6/15) of patients receiving tucatinib/trastuzumab. Sixty-one percent (14/23) of patients treated with the combination of all 3 drugs had an objective response.”

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Newly-Approved Therapy Provides Improved Quality of Life for Midgut Neuroendocrine Tumor Patients

Excerpt:

“Midgut neuroendocrine tumors are a rare type of cancer that develops in the small intestine and colon. Roughly 12,000 people are diagnosed with this disease each year. In January, the United Stated Food and Drug Administration approved Lutathera, a first-of-its-kind peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. The injection consists of a somatostatin analog combined with a radioactive isotope that directly targets neuroendocrine tumor cells.

“Dr. Jonathan Strosberg, head of Neuroendocrine Tumor Program at Moffitt ‘Treatment options have been limited for  with neuroendocrine tumors and toxicities of treatment can often outweigh the benefit. Our studies have shown Lutathera is an effective option to treat tumor progression and also provide patients with a better  of life,’ said Jonathan R. Strosberg, M.D., head of the Neuroendocrine Tumor Program at Moffitt Cancer Center.”

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Immunotherapy Outcomes May Be Better in Older Patients With Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Older patients with melanoma may respond better to anti-PD-1 immunotherapy treatment than their younger counterparts, according to a recent study published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal from the American Association for Cancer Research.

“Researchers collected melanoma tissue samples from 538 patients from the United States, Australia and Germany. The samples were then divided into two categories: those belonging to people over the age of 62 and those belonging to people younger than 62. All of the patients were treated with the immunotherapy agent, Keytruda (pembrolizumab), which targets and blocks PD-1, making the immune system more likely to identify and attack cancer cells.”

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Durable Responses Observed With Novel Oncolytic Therapy in Recurrent Glioma

Excerpt:

“In a pilot study of recurrent glioma, 26% of patients treated with the optimal dose of vocimagene amiretroprepvec (aka Toca 511), a novel oncolytic virus therapy, achieved durable, long-term responses and remained alive 3 or more years later. This outcome far exceeded ‘historical benchmarks’ for this poor-prognosis population, according to lead researcher Bob S. Carter, MD, PhD, the William and Elizabeth Sweet Professor and Chief of Neurosurgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.”

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Early Detection and Intervention Reduce Breast Cancer–Related Lymphedema

Excerpt:

“A new study has found that early detection along with a simple intervention can be highly effective in preventing breast cancer–related lymphedema for at-risk women. According to data presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Breast Surgeons, 82% of women identified at an early stage of lymphatic impairment returned to their normal pretreatment measurements following patient-administered therapies that combined compression sleeve garments and self-directed massage. The researchers, who used bioimpedance spectroscopy to measure extracellular fluid, emphasized that early screening of lymphatic function is crucial to address subtle lymphatic changes before they become permanent. ”

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Cell-Free DNA Blood Test May Detect Early-Stage Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“As part of our coverage of the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, held June 1–5 in Chicago, we spoke with lung cancer specialist Dr. Geoff Oxnard, an associate professor of medicine at Boston’s Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School. At ASCO, Dr. Oxnard presented data from a study he and colleagues conducted on a blood test that could potentially noninvasively detect early-stage lung cancer.”

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PARP Inhibitor Improves Overall Response Rates in Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

Excerpt:

In a randomized, Phase II trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, adding the PARP inhibitor veliparib to a standard chemotherapy agent improved overall response rates (ORR) in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Researchers also identified a select group of patients—those whose tumors expressed SLFN11— who also saw a progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) benefit, suggesting a promising biomarker for the PARP-inhibitor sensitivity in SCLC.

“The study was published in Journal of Clinical Oncology. Ongoing follow-up studies are underway to confirm the results, which could result in the first new therapeutic option for this rare and aggressive lung cancer in more than three decades, said Lauren Averett Byers, M.D., associate professor of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology.”

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Upfront MRI Could Rule Out Prostate Ca in Most, Reduce Biopsy Need

Excerpt:

“Upfront use of biparametric magnetic resonance imaging (bpMRI), a more rapid and lower-cost version of multiparametric MRI, rules out almost all significant disease in men with suspected prostate cancer and thus would spare many from invasive biopsy, a new study indicated.

“Among 1,020 men who underwent both bpMRI and standardized transrectal (TRUS) biopsy, low-suspicion bpMRI had a negative predictive value of 97% in ruling out significant prostate cancer (95% CI 95%-99%), reported Lars Boesen, MD, PhD, of Herlev Gentofte University Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues.”

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Talazoparib Granted Priority Review by FDA for BRCA+ Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“A new drug application (NDA) for the PARP inhibitor talazoparib has been granted a priority review by the FDA for the treatment of patients with germline BRCA mutation–positive, HER2-negative locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, according to Pfizer, the manufacturer of the agent.

“In results from the phase III EMBRACA trial, on which the application is based, talazoparib reduced risk of disease progression or death by 46% compared with chemotherapy in patients with BRCA-positive advanced breast cancer. At a median follow-up of 11.2 months, the Median progression-free survival (PFS) at the median follow-up of 11.2 months was 8.6 months (95% CI, 7.2-9.3) with talazoparib versus 5.6 months (95% CI, 4.2-6.7) with physician’s choice of therapy (HR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.41-0.71; P <.0001). The objective response rate (ORR) was 62.6% (95% CI, 55.8-69.0) compared with 27.2% (95% CI, 19.3-36.3), respectively (odds ratio, 4.99; 95% CI, 2.9-8.8; 2-sided P value <.0001).”

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