Data Emerge on New Immunotherapeutic Targets for Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Several trials either have been completed or are underway to evaluate new immunotherapeutic targets for patients with melanoma, according to a presenter at HemOnc Today New York.

” ‘When we think about where we’re going with immune therapy, it’s important to realize where we are and where have we been,’ Michael A. Postow, MD, assistant attending physician on the melanoma-sarcoma service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, said during his presentation. ‘What are the targets we have been using, and how do we modify what we know and explore totally new territory to try to improve outcomes?’ ”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Salvage Immunotherapy Viable for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Immunotherapy remains a viable option for pretreated patients with non-small cell lung cancer, but the data are rapidly evolving, according to a presenter at HemOnc Today New York.

” ‘We have come a long way with the development of checkpoint inhibitors, and we have to remember that they became famous and exerted their effect in the chemotherapy-refractory setting first,’ Benjamin Levy, MD, assistant professor of oncology at Johns Hopkins University and clinical director of Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, said during his presentation.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Earlier Indicator of Palbociclib Response Found for Patients with Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“According to findings published in Nature Communications, a blood test detecting early changes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may provide earlier indication of whether patients with hormone receptor–positive, HER2-negative breast cancer are responding to the CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib (Ibrance).

“The test could detect a response within 2 to 3 seeks, said investigators with The Institute of Cancer Research, London, and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust. Women currently wait 2 to 3 months to find out if palbociclib treatment is working for them.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Adjuvant Vemurafenib in Resected BRAF V600–Mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“In the international phase III BRIM8 trial reported in The Lancet Oncology, Maio et al found inconclusive evidence of benefit of adjuvant vemurafenib treatment in patients with BRAF V600–mutant melanoma.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


FDA Authorizes Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Test for Three BRCA Mutations

Excerpt:

“The FDA authorized marketing the direct-to-consumer Personal Genome Service Genetic Health Risk Report for three mutations of BRCA1 and BRCA2 most common among people of Eastern European Ashkenazi Jewish descent, according to a press release.

“The test — marketed by 23andMe — analyzes DNA using self-collected saliva samples to determine whether a woman is at increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer and whether a man is at increased risk for breast or prostate cancer.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


One-Off PSA Screening for Prostate Cancer Does Not Save Lives

Excerpt:

“Inviting men with no symptoms to a one-off PSA test for prostate cancer does not save lives according to results from the largest ever prostate cancer trial conducted over 10 years by Cancer Research UK-funded scientists and published today (Tuesday) in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

“Researchers at the Universities of Bristol and Oxford found that testing asymptomatic men with PSA detects some disease that would be unlikely to cause any harm but also misses some aggressive and lethal prostate cancers.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Novel Combo Explored for Rare Brain Tumor

Excerpt:

“Investigators are seeking to determine whether the combination of eflornithine (alphadifluoromethylornithine) with lomustine can improve survival for patients with recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma (AA). A rare form of brain tumor, AA occurs more often in adults aged 30 to 50 years and accounts for 17% of primary malignant brain tumors. This tumor type is even more rare when it recurs, according to Victor A. Levin, MD, emeritus professor of neurooncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and a clinical professor at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Trilaciclib Reduces Chemotherapy-Induced Myelosuppression in Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Trilaciclib appeared associated with reduced chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression and was well tolerated among patients undergoing first-line therapy for extensive-stage small cell lung cancer, according to results from a double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial.

“Trilaciclib (G1 Therapeutics) is a short-acting CDK4/6 inhibitor that preserves hematopoietic stem cells and enhances immune system function — myelopreservation — during chemotherapy.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Interest Builds in Targeting MET Mutations in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Although checkpoint blockade immunotherapies have advanced rapidly in the treatment paradigm for patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), interest in developing targeted therapies for this malignancy has remained high. Building on the success of molecularly targeted drugs aimed at relatively small subsets of patients, researchers are increasingly aiming at the MET oncogene.

“During the past several years, interest in MET activity has grown as investigators have considered it both as a biomarker and target for treatment, particularly since the focus on MET exon 14 skipping mutations has led to the development of several second-generation MET inhibitors, according to Balazs Halmos, MD, MS.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.