Chemo Benefit Unclear in Breast Cancer Patients With Higher Recurrence Scores

Excerpt:

“In patients with hormone receptor–positive, HER2-negative, lymph node–negative breast cancer with a recurrence score (RS) based on a 21-gene expression assay of 11 to 25, outcomes were similar whether chemotherapy was used or not used, according to a retrospective analysis. However, the study’s limited follow-up means a benefit from chemotherapy in these patients cannot be ruled out.

“The Oncotype DX 21-gene expression assay is the most commonly used test of this kind in breast cancer in the United States. It offers an RS, and previous research has shown that patients with an RS below 11 fare very well when treated with endocrine therapy alone. ‘To our knowledge, it is unknown whether chemotherapy provides any additional benefit in outcomes in patients with hormone receptor–positive, HER2-negative, lymph node–negative, early-stage breast cancer with an RS of 11 to 25 who are treated with endocrine therapy,’ wrote study authors led by Carlos H. Barcenas, MD, MSc, of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.”

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Pembrolizumab Long-Term Survival Rate Could Reach 25% in NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Treatment with pembrolizumab (Keytruda) could elicit long-term survival (LTS) rates of 21% to 25% for previously-treated patients with PD-L1–positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with 3% to 4% for docetaxel, according to a statistical analysis of findings from the KEYNOTE-010 and -001 trials presented at the 2017 ASCO-SITC Symposium.

“Findings from the analysis shed light on the number of patients with advanced NSCLC expected to benefit for up to 70 months from pembrolizumab. According to survival statistics from the SEER database for 2006 to 2012, the 5-year survival rate was 4.3% for those with lung or bronchus cancer with distant metastases.”

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CancerConnect Launches Online Community for Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“OMNI Health Media (OMNI) announces the launch of a new online community on CancerConnect for individuals with neuroendocrine tumors (NET). This community will provide patients and their loved ones with information and support. Join the conversation in the NET community here.

“Although neuroendocrine tumors have historically been considered rare, the incidence of neuroendocrine tumors has been increasing.  Recent statistics suggest that the current number of people with neuroendocrine tumors exceeds 100,000 in the United States—more than the number of people with other, better known cancers like pancreatic or stomach cancer. The increase in NET diagnoses parallels improved diagnosis and treatments around the world.”

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FDA Grants Ceritinib Priority Review in Frontline ALK+ NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The FDA has granted a priority review to ceritinib (Zykadia) as a first-line treatment for patients with ALK-positive, metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to Novartis, the manufacturer of the second-generation ALK inhibitor.

“The priority review is based on findings from the phase III ASCEND-4 trial, in which ceritinib reduced the risk of disease progression or death by 45% compared with standard chemotherapy. The median progression-free survival (PFS) benefit favoring ceritinib was 8.5 months (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.42-0.73; P <.001).”

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Expert Calls for Shorter Radiation Use in Prostate Cancer Treatment

Excerpt:

“Men with prostate cancer can receive shorter courses of radiation therapy than what is currently considered standard, according to Justin Bekelman, MD, an associate professor of Radiation Oncology, Medical Ethics, and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine and Abramson Cancer Center. In his call for practice change, Bekelman cites research showing the shorter radiation treatment — known as moderate hypofractionation — is just as effective at treating cancer, while costing less and easing the burden on patients. The commentary was published online by the International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology and Physics and was co-authored by W. Robert Lee, MD, MEd, MS, a professor of Radiation Oncology at the Duke University School of Medicine.”

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Lynparza Meets Primary Endpoint in Phase III Trial in BRCA-Mutated Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“AstraZeneca today announced positive results from its Phase III OLYMPIAD trial comparing Lynparza (olaparib) tablets (300mg twice daily) to physician’s choice of a standard of care chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer harbouring germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Patients treated with Lynparza showed a statistically-significant and clinically-meaningful improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) compared with those who received chemotherapy (capecitabine, vinorelbine or eribulin).”

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Phase III Results Support Novel Focal Therapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Padeliporfin vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy, a novel tissue-preserving treatment, may offer men with low-risk prostate cancer a safe and effective alternative to either active surveillance or radical therapy, according to the results of a phase III trial published in The Lancet Oncology.

“Among treatment-naïve patients with low-risk, localized prostate cancer, disease progression at 24 months was 28% among patients receiving padeliporfin vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy versus 58% in those receiving active surveillance (HR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.24-0.46; P <.0001). The median time to progression was 28.3 months (95% CI, 26.0-30.6) versus 14.1 months (95% CI, 12.9-23.8; P <.0001), respectively.”

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Four New Studies of Oncotype DX® Genomic Prostate Score™ (GPS) Reconfirm Value of Test in Guiding Early-stage Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment and Treatment Selection

Excerpt:

“Genomic Health, Inc. (GHDX) announced today the presentation of results from four studies evaluating the clinical value and utility of its Oncotype DX® Genomic Prostate Score (GPS) in the management of early-stage prostate cancer. Collectively, these new data highlight the test’s ability to predict disease aggressiveness and refine risk stratification across National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) clinical risk groups.

” ‘We now have 22 clinical studies, involving more than 4,200 prostate cancer patients, that distinguish Oncotype DX as the only test developed specifically for men who are deciding between active surveillance or definitive treatment. The test is validated to provide individualized information about both the current state and future risk of patients’ prostate cancer,’ said Phil Febbo, M.D., chief medical officer, Genomic Health. ‘Together with the recently published economic analysis demonstrating substantial cost savings of more than $2,200 per patient tested, the data presented will support increased adoption and reimbursement of Oncotype DX as physicians aim to bring precision medicine to their prostate cancer patients.’ “

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More Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer May Be Able to Avoid Chemotherapy in the Future

Excerpt:

“Women with early-stage breast cancer who had an intermediate risk recurrence score (RS) from a 21-gene expression assay had similar outcomes, regardless of whether they received chemotherapy, a new study from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer finds.

“The encouraging research, published in the journal CANCER, still needs to be validated in an ongoing international trial. If verified, women with intermediate scores may one day be able to avoid chemotherapy as standard of care.”

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