Atezolizumab Plus Chemotherapy Improves PFS for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“First-line atezolizumab plus nab-paclitaxel improved PFS compared with placebo among patients with metastatic or unresectable locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer, according to interim results from the IMpassion130 trial released by the manufacturer.

“Researchers observed prolonged PFS in both the intention-to-treat population and the PD-L1-positive population.”

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FDA Grants Priority Review to Keytruda Plus Chemotherapy for Lung Cancer Subtype

Excerpt:

“The FDA granted priority review designation to a supplemental biologics license application that seeks approval of pembrolizumab for use in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment of metastatic squamous non-small cell lung cancer regardless of PD-L1 expression.

“The agency set a target action date of Oct. 30.”

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First Patient Dosed in Phase I/II Trial of Novel Immunotherapy Combination in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“The first patient has been dosed in a phase I/II open-label, multicenter trial investigating a novel immunotherapy combination in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM). Fifty patients have been accrued in the trial, as of May 31, 2018, which will be conducted at 25 sites across the nation.

“This study aims to investigate the efficacy of INO-5401, a T-cell activating immunotherapy agent encoding multiple antigens in GBM, and INO-9012, an immune activator encoding IL-12, in combination with the PD-1 inhibitor cemiplimab (REGN2810).”

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Deadly Subtype Makes Up 17% of Metastatic Prostate Cancers

Excerpt:

“Treatment-emergent small cell neuroendocrine prostate cancer, a particularly deadly subtype of the disease, occurs in nearly one-fifth of all cases of metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer, study data showed.

“Researchers suggested that the subtype should be treated with novel targeted therapies that are currently in the development or testing phase.”

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High Marks for HIFU in Early Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Men with newly diagnosed, nonmetastatic prostate cancer had a 5-year failure-free survival (FFS) of 88% when treated with focal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, results of a multicenter European clinical experience showed.

“The 625-patient cohort had a 5-year overall survival of 99%, and none of the patients died of prostate cancer during a median follow-up of 56 months. In a subgroup of men who submitted questionnaires on patient-reported outcomes, 98% said they did not require absorbent pads for urinary incontinence.”

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Steroids Lower Survival Benefits Associated with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“The use of steroids at baseline was associated with inferior survival outcomes in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who were starting either PD-1 or PD-L1 blockade therapy, according to retrospective data presented at ASCO Annual Meeting.

” ‘Treatment with PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors is now standard therapy for nearly all patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer,’ Kathryn C. Arbour, MD, a fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, said during her presentation. ‘The potential impact of steroids in patients with PD-1 or PD-L1 blockade has been an open question. Steroids are frequently used as a supportive medication in cancer care and can provide rapid relief of numerous cancer-related symptoms, including dyspnea, anorexia, pain, fatigue and symptoms associated with brain metastases. However … [physicians] routinely recognize that there can be substantial toxicities associated with long-term steroid use.’ ”

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FDA Approves Enzalutamide for Nonmetastatic CRPC

Excerpt:

“The FDA has approved enzalutamide (Xtandi) for the treatment of patients with nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), according to Pfizer and Astellas, the codevelopers of the antiandrogen agent.

“The approval is based on the phase III PROSPER trial, in which the combination of enzalutamide (Xtandi) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) reduced the risk of metastases or death by 71% compared with ADT alone for patients with nonmetastatic CRPC. In the double-blind study, the median metastasis-free survival (MFS) was 36.6 months with enzalutamide plus ADT versus 14.7 months with ADT alone (HR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.24-0.35; P <.0001).”

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Immune-Based Therapy May Be Tool Against Melanoma in the Brain

Excerpt:

“A type of therapy that harnesses the immune system is giving new hope to people battling a once hopeless cancer — melanoma that’s spread to the brain.

“New research involving more than 2,700 U.S. patients is confirming what specialists in the field have long known — that “checkpoint blockade” treatment can beat back these devastating tumors.”

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New Treatment Lowers Risk for Death from Aggressive Prostate Cancer by Over 70 Percent, Study Finds

Excerpt:

“Some of the 165,000 U.S. men who are estimated to receive a new diagnosis of prostate cancer this year will develop resistance to hormonal therapies for the disease, but a new study by a doctor now at Northwestern Memorial Hospital points to use of an existing drug to help treat them.

“This kind of aggressive cancer has challenged doctors, as effective treatment to improve outcomes for these men hadn’t existed previously. But a clinical trial led by Dr. Maha Hussain, now an oncologist at Northwestern Memorial, showed that taking a drug, enzalutamide, resulted in a 71 percent lower risk of cancer spread or death, compared to those taking a placebo during the three-year trial. The patients involved all had prostate cancer that hadn’t spread but that also had not responded to hormone treatment.”

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