Genome Analysis Helps Keep Deadly Brain Cancer at Bay for Five Years

Excerpt:

“An analysis of a patient’s deadly brain tumor helped doctors at Smilow Cancer Hospital identify new emerging mutations and keep a 55-year old woman alive for more than five years, researchers report in the journal Genome Medicine.

“The median survival rate for patients with glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is only 15 months, but three separate genomic analyses of the tumor identified new mutations that allowed doctors to adjust treatment and keep the patient alive for over five years, through two recurrences of the cancer.”

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Strosberg Discusses Latest Lutathera Data in Midgut Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“In December 2016, the FDA informed Advanced Accelerator Applications that its new drug application for Lutathera (177Lutetium DOTA-octreotate) as a treatment for patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) would need to be resubmitted.

“The application was based on the phase III NETTER-1 trial, which randomized patients with advanced, progressive, somatostatin receptor-positive midgut NETS to receive either Lutathera (116 patients) plus best supportive care, including octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR), or octreotide LAR alone (113 patients).”

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Immunotherapy Needs a New Math

Excerpt:

“A group of doctors and other healthcare industry professionals have set out to develop a more efficient tool for assessing the true value of immuno-oncology (I/O) drugs. They note that these drugs often come with high prices that may distract from their advantages over other types of therapy. For example, Kroger Pharmacy is selling the checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab (Yervoy) for $140 per mg. At the recommended dose of 3 mg/kg for melanoma patients, the total expense can be high. However, ipilimumab is one of the class of I/O drugs that have improved expectations on supportive care costs and survival benefit. The old measures of value may not apply. Therefore, how does one determine whether $140/mg is a fair price for the drug?”

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Blood Test Instead of Biopsy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“There has been a lot of buzz recently about the use of ‘liquid biopsies’ and how these blood tests that show cancer may be able to replace the need for tissue biopsies.

“The latest study shows that such a test could be useful in metastatic prostate cancer, where the biopsy sample would need to be taken from bone, which is painful, risky, and expensive, says an expert.

“This study used the Guardant360 test and found that cell-free, circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) was detected in most patients (94%) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).”

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Rovalpituzumab Tesirine Active and Safe in Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Rovalpituzumab tesirine (Rova-T), a DLL3-targeted antibody-drug conjugate, demonstrated encouraging single-agent antitumor activity with a manageable safety profile in the treatment of patients with recurrent small cell lung cancer (SCLC), according to the results of a phase I study published in The Lancet Oncology.

“Eleven of 60 assessable patients (18%) who received an active dose of Rova-T (0.2 mg/kg or 0.4 mg/kg every 3 weeks or 0.3 mg/kg or 0.4 mg/kg every 6 weeks) achieved a confirmed objective response, and 30 patients (50%) had stable disease. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 2.8 months (95% CI, 2.5-4.0).”

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Nab-Paclitaxel Paired With Anti-PD-L1 Immunotherapies in TNBC Studies

Excerpt:

“Combination regimens that pair nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane) with PD-L1 checkpoint blockade immunotherapy agents are emerging as a robust area of investigation in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), bolstered by clinical trial results that establish the chemotherapeutic agent as an effective partner for other therapies.

“Although nab-paclitaxel has been combined in some studies with other chemotherapies, the focus is shifting to regimens that include immunotherapies as the efficacy of that approach continues to grow. Nab-paclitaxel, an albumin-bound form of paclitaxel, is indicated for patients with metastatic breast cancer after prior chemotherapy.”

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Novel HER2 Inhibitor Offers Manageable Toxicity, Anti-Tumor Activity in Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“A phase I trial found that the HER2 inhibitor ONT-380 had a lower incidence of certain adverse events associated with this class of agent and notable anti-tumor activity in heavily pretreated patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC).

” ‘Though existing targeted therapies are improving outcomes in patients with HER2-positive MBC, disease resistance does eventually develop in most patients,’ wrote study authors led by Stacy Moulder, MD, of the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Also, some agents preclude combination with other regimens due to off-target effects such as skin rash and diarrhea.”

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Breast Cancer Patients with Dense Breast Tissue More Likely to Develop Contralateral Disease

Excerpt:

“Breast cancer patients with dense breast tissue have almost a two-fold increased risk of developing disease in the contralateral breast, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer.

“The study, published in the journal Cancer, is among the first to find the association between breast density (BD) and contralateral breast cancer (CBC).

“According to study author Isabelle Bedrosian, M.D., a big challenge in the management of this patient population, especially as they are making surgical decisions, is trying to counsel women appropriately on their risk of developing breast cancer in the other breast.”

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The Next Few Years Will Bring Stunning Progress for TNBC, Expert Says

Excerpt:

“The treatment landscape for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is transforming, experts say, with the potential additions of immunotherapy and PARP inhibitors. These agents are being explored both as monotherapy and in combination regimens with standard chemotherapy options.

“At the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, treatment with pembrolizumab (Keytruda) continued to show a consistent durable benefit with an additional year of follow-up for heavily pretreated patients with recurrent PD-L1–positive TNBC, according to findings from the phase Ib KEYNOTE-012 trial.”

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