Lanreotide Improves Survival with Enteropancreatic Tumors

The gist: A clinical trial with volunteer patients tested the effectiveness of a drug called lanreotide for people with grade 1 or 2 metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The researchers found that, compared to taking a “fake” placebo drug, lanreotide increased the amount of time patients lived without their disease worsening. However, lanreotide did not improve overall survival or quality of life.

“Lanreotide significantly improves survival among patients with metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (grade 1 or 2), according to a study published in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

“Martyn E. Caplin, D.M., from Royal Free Hospital in London, and colleagues conducted a multinational study of patients with advanced, well-differentiated or moderately-differentiated, nonfunctioning, somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors (grade 1 or 2 that originated in the pancreas, midgut, or hindgut, or were of unknown origin) and documented disease-progression status. Participants were randomly assigned to receive an extended-release aqueous-gel formulation of lanreotide at a dose of 120 mg (101 patients) or placebo (103 patients) once every 28 days for 96 weeks.

“The researchers found that, compared to placebo, lanreotide was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival (P placebo group. In predefined subgroups, the therapeutic effect was generally consistent with that found in the overall population. Groups were similar in quality of life and overall survival. Diarrhea was the most common treatment-related adverse event (26 percent of the lanreotide group versus 9 percent of the placebo group).”