PV-10 Well-Tolerated in Treatment of Refractory Cutaneous Melanoma

The gist: A new treatment has shown early promise for treating people with cutaneous melanoma that worsened after previous treatment. The new treatment involves injecting a substance called rose bengal disodium into melanoma lesions. It was tested in volunteer patients in a recent clinical trial. The treatment proved safe, and 51% of the patients experienced a good response.

“Intralesional injection of rose bengal disodium was well-tolerated in patients with refractory cutaneous melanoma, with just over half of patients meeting the primary study endpoint, according to a poster presented at the European Society of Medical Oncology Annual Congress.

“Researchers included 80 patients with 6.3-cm median sum lesion diameter in biopsy-confirmed melanoma that was refractory to a median of six previous interventions in the study. The patients received intralesional injections of rose bengal disodium (PV-10) in up to 20 cutaneous and subcutaneous lesions up to four times during a 16-week period. Follow-up was 52 weeks.

“The researchers assessed best overall response rate (BORR) in up to 10 injected target lesions, and secondary endpoints included the assessment of response duration, BORR of untreated bystander lesions, overall survival and adverse events.

“PV-10 was found to be well-tolerated, and 41 patients achieved the study’s primary endpoint of an objective response for an overall response rate of 51%.”