To Predict Responses to Checkpoint Blockade, an Understanding of Immune Responses Is Needed

“Spreading the success of cancer immunotherapy beyond those patients currently enjoying powerful, long-term responses to treatment requires greater understanding of the immune response to tumors, two leaders in the field note in a review in the April 3 Science.

” ‘Identifying in advance who will benefit from treatment and developing combination therapies to improve and expand on current results will require us to decipher the dynamics of human immune response to tumors and their surrounding microenvironment,’ said co-author Padmanee Sharma, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Genitourinary Medical Oncology and Immunology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

“Immune checkpoint blockade, the unleashing of immune response against cancer by blocking molecules on T cells that shut down those attacking cells, produces durable results and long-term survival in a substantial fraction of patients with some cancers. For example, 22 percent of advanced melanoma patients treated with ipilimumab (Yervoy®), the first checkpoint inhibitor, live for four years or longer. Right now there’s no way to identify those most likely to benefit.