AACR: LY2835219 Promising for Metastatic Breast Cancer

“The novel cell cycle inhibitor selective for the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 (CDK4/6), LY2835219, shows promise for metastatic breast cancer, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, held from April 5 to 9 in San Diego.

“Amita Patnaik, M.D., from South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics in San Antonio, and colleagues conducted a phase I study with expansion cohorts to assess the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of LY2835219 in five tumor types. LY2835219 was administered to the expansion cohorts (132 patients) every 12 hours on days one to 28 of a 28-day cycle.”

Editor’s note: LY2835219 is a new drug that shows promise for treating metastatic breast cancer.


U.S. Cancer Experts’ Report Emphasizes Successes, Need for More Funding

The fight against cancer has made “amazing progress,” according to the annual progress report of the American Association for Cancer Research. Thanks to advances in cancer prevention and treatment, death rates from malignant cancers in the U.S. have fallen 24.5% for men and 15.8% for women since 1990, resulting in an estimated 1 million lives saved. However, the aging population will result in a sharp increase in the number of people living with cancer, both in the U.S. and worldwide. The report therefore argues for increased funding for cancer research. A special highlight in the report focuses on cancer immunology, which utilizes the body’s own immune system to fight cancer, and which has made significant advances in recent years.


U.S. Cancer Experts’ Report Emphasizes Successes, Need for More Funding

The fight against cancer has made “amazing progress,” according to the annual progress report of the American Association for Cancer Research. Thanks to advances in cancer prevention and treatment, death rates from malignant cancers in the U.S. have fallen 24.5% for men and 15.8% for women since 1990, resulting in an estimated 1 million lives saved. However, the aging population will result in a sharp increase in the number of people living with cancer, both in the U.S. and worldwide. The report therefore argues for increased funding for cancer research. A special highlight in the report focuses on cancer immunology, which utilizes the body’s own immune system to fight cancer, and which has made significant advances in recent years.


U.S. Cancer Experts’ Report Emphasizes Successes, Need for More Funding

The fight against cancer has made “amazing progress,” according to the annual progress report of the American Association for Cancer Research. Thanks to advances in cancer prevention and treatment, death rates from malignant cancers in the U.S. have fallen 24.5% for men and 15.8% for women since 1990, resulting in an estimated 1 million lives saved. However, the aging population will result in a sharp increase in the number of people living with cancer, both in the U.S. and worldwide. The report therefore argues for increased funding for cancer research. A special highlight in the report focuses on cancer immunology, which utilizes the body’s own immune system to fight cancer, and which has made significant advances in recent years.


The Cancer Biomarker Problem


In 2008, Dr. Charles Sawyers, currently the president of American Association for Cancer Research, wrote an article for the journal Nature entitled: ‘The Cancer Biomarker Problem.’ This excellent paper clearly explains what cancer biomarkers are, outlines the different categories of biomarkers, and emphasizes how important biomarkers are in the field of targeted therapies. Predictive biomarkers are indispensable tools that should direct the rational use of targeted drugs in cancer patients. There are additional types of biomarkers, including some that could help evaluate the course of cancer progression or help determine the effective dose of an investigational drug. But this post focuses on predictive biomarkers. Continue reading…


Genetic Mutations Could Help Identify Aggressive Prostate Tumors Faster


A new study suggests that mutations associated with aggressive prostate tumors can be detected before pathologists recognize the cells as aggressive. John Cheville, MD, pathologist; George Vasmatzis, PhD, assistant professor of laboratory medicine and pathology; and colleagues from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, used next-generation genomic sequencing to compare the genetic alterations of pathologically distinct cells from the same prostate tumor. The study is published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Continue reading…


Combining an Immune Checkpoint Antibody with an Anti-Angiogenesis Inhibitor


A small phase I study combining the immune checkpoint antibody ipilimumab with the angiogenesis inhibitor antibody bevacizumab showed promising results in advanced melanoma patients in 2011. Now, researchers are continuing to study the combination of immunotherapy and anti-angiogenic agents to understand which patients could best benefit from such a combination. Continue reading…


Prostate Cancer ‘Dream Teams’ Lay Out Project Plans to Target Treatment-Resistant Prostate Cancer and to Identify New Prostate Cancer Subgroups


Last week, cancer researchers gathered in Washington, D.C., to attend the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) annual meeting. At the meeting, two large-scale projects to improve the treatment of prostate cancer and prolong patients’ survival were outlined in presentations by two prominent researchers and clinicians: Arul M. Chinnaiyan, MD, PhD, a professor of urology at the University of Michigan and director of the Michigan Center for Translational Pathology in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and Eric J. Small, MD, the deputy director of clinical sciences at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center. Continue reading…


Targeting Non-BRAF Mutations in Melanoma to Address BRAF Inhibitor Therapy Resistance


BRAF-mutated metastatic melanoma can be treated with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug vemurafenib, an oral therapy that targets the V600E mutation in the BRAF protein. Another BRAF inhibitor, dabrafenib, has been filed with the FDA for treatment of the same patient population. BRAF inhibition results in rapid shrinkage of tumors for the majority of BRAF-mutated melanoma patients. But while treatment with a BRAF inhibitor alone results in tumor shrinkage in the short-term, patients’ tumors begin to grow again, typically 6 to 7 months after starting treatment. Continue reading…