TLR9 Agonist CMP-001-Pembrolizumab Combination Shows Early Efficacy for Metastatic Melanoma Resistant to Anti-PD-1

Excerpt:

A combination of CMP-001, an intratumoral Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist, and pembrolizumab (Keytruda), tested in patients with metastatic melanoma resistant to PD-1 checkpoint inhibition, was well tolerated and had clinical activity according to preliminary data presented from the ongoing phase Ib clinical trial at the AACR Annual Meeting 2018, April 14-18, in Chicago.

” ‘Checkpoint inhibition is quickly becoming a key tool for oncologists to treat cancer,’ said Mohammed Milhem, MBBS, clinical professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa, Iowa City. ‘However, there are many  that either initially respond to checkpoint inhibition and then progress, or never respond to this therapy to begin with. Finding safe and effective therapies for these patients is critical.’ ”

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Pembrolizumab Reduced the Risk for Recurrence of Stage 3 Melanoma

Excerpt:

“A one-year course of 18 doses of pembrolizumab (Keytruda) significantly reduced the risk of recurrence for patients with stage 3 melanoma who were at high risk of recurrence after surgery, according to data from the KEYNOTE-054/EORTC 1325-MG phase III clinical trial, presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2018, April 14–18.

“This study is being published simultaneously in The New England Journal of Medicine.”

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Frontline Atezolizumab Benefit in NSCLC Sustained Across Biomarker-Driven Subgroups

Excerpt:

“Adding atezolizumab (Tecentriq) to chemotherapy and an angiogenesis inhibitor led to significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with untreated advanced nonsquamous non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to results from an ongoing trial presented at the 2018 AACR Annual Meeting.

“In the IMpower150 trial, patients who received the PD-L1 inhibitor along with bevacizumab (Avastin) and chemotherapy had a median PFS of 8.3 months compared with 6.8 months with bevacizumab and chemotherapy. The difference translated into a 38% reduction in the hazard for progression or death (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.52-0.74; P <.0001).”

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Neoadjuvant Nivolumab was Safe, Yielded Pathologic Responses in Patients With Resectable Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“The anti-PD1 immunotherapy nivolumab (Opdivo) given prior to surgical resection of stage 1-3 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was safe and resulted in major pathological responses in 45 percent of the patients, according to data from a clinical trial presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2018, April 14-18.

“A major pathologic response is defined as 10 percent or fewer viable cancer cells detectable in the resected tumor following neoadjuvant treatment.”

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AACR 2018: Acquired HER2 Mutations Confer Resistance to Hormone Therapy in ER-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Mutations in HER2 were found to confer resistance to hormone therapy in some estrogen receptor (ER)-positive metastatic breast cancer cases, and resistance could be reversed by dual treatment with the hormone therapy fulvestrant (Faslodex) and the HER2 kinase inhibitor neratinib (Nerlynx), according to data presented during a media preview for the 2018 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting, to be held April 14–18 in Chicago.”

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