ABRAXANE® Approved by European Commission for First-Line Treatment of Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

“Celgene International Sàrl, a wholly owned subsidiary of Celgene Corporation CELG, -0.88% today announced that the European Commission (EC) has approved ABRAXANE® (paclitaxel formulated as albumin-bound nanoparticles, or nab-paclitaxel) in combination with carboplatin for the first-line treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in adult patients who are not candidates for potentially curative surgery and/or radiation therapy.

“The ABRAXANE Marketing Authorisation has been updated across 28 member states in the European Union to include this new indication in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adding to the existing indications for the treatment of metastatic pancreatic and breast cancers.

“Lung cancer is the fourth most commonly diagnosed cancer in both men and women, however it is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Europe. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer, accounting for 85 to 90% of all cases. The predominant cause of lung cancer is cigarette smoking, although environmental and occupational factors also can cause the cancer.

“The EC decision follows the positive CHMP opinion received on 23 January and is based on the results of a multicenter, randomized, open-label study including 1,052 chemotherapy-naive patients with Stage IIIb/IV non-small cell lung cancer. The study compared ABRAXANE in combination with carboplatin versus solvent-based paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin as first-line treatment in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The primary efficacy endpoint, overall response rate, was significantly higher for patients in the ABRAXANE/carboplatin arm at 33%, compared with patients in the control arm, at 25%. The most common adverse reactions (greater-than or equal to 20%) of ABRAXANE in combination with carboplatin for NSCLC were anaemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, peripheral neuropathy, nausea, and fatigue.”


Phase III Results Demonstrate Significant Pathological Complete Response for Nab-Paclitaxel in Neoadjuvant Breast Cancer–

The gist: The drug nab-paclitaxel (aka Abraxane) has shown promise for patients with early-stage, high-risk breast cancer. Nab-paclitaxel is an injectable version of the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel. In a clinical trial, tumors disappeared in 38% of the patients who took nab-paclitaxel, compared to 29% of patients who took conventional paclitaxel. Learn more about the treatment, and its side effects, here.

“The German Breast Group (GBG) said nab-paclitaxel (ABRAXANE®) demonstrated significant benefit for patients with early high risk breast cancer when compared to conventional solvent-based paclitaxel. The findings are from the GeparSepto clinical trial sponsored by GBG and conducted together with the German AGO-B study group involving over 1200 patients, which is the largest randomized Phase III study ever completed with nab-paclitaxel and the first one completed in high risk early breast cancer. The results were presented by the coordinating investigator Michael Untch, M.D., Berlin in General Session 2 on December 10th, at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

“The study found a statistically significant and clinically meaningful 9% absolute improvement from 29% to 38% (p=<0.001) in the pCR (pathological complete response) rate, when neoadjuvant (preoperative) chemotherapy was started with nab-paclitaxel instead of conventional solvent-based paclitaxel followed by epirubicin/cyclophosphamide given all before surgery. Pathological complete response after neoadjuvant treatment for breast cancer is a surrogate marker for long-term efficacy.

“ ‘The phase III study provided a head-to-head comparison of weekly nab-paclitaxel with weekly conventional paclitaxel followed by epirubicin/cyclophosphamide in both arms before surgery. Our findings clearly demonstrate nab-paclitaxel is superior to paclitaxel in achieving pCRs in early high risk breast cancer,’ Prof. Dr. Michael Untch.”


NICE 'No' for Celgene's Abraxane in Pancreatic Cancer

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has published new recommendations rejecting the use of Celgene’s Abraxane (nab-paclitaxel) on the National Health Service to treat patients with advanced pancreatic cancer.

“According to the cost regulator, the drug, a novel formulation of the chemotherapy paclitaxel, is not as effective as standard therapy and is more expensive, and thereby fails to hit value-for-money criteria.

“NICE says that data provided by Celgene show that the chemo regimen FOLFIRINOX, a first-line option for patients with the disease, was actually more clinically effective than the Abraxane/gemcitabine combination. And while Abraxane/gemcitabine was more effective than gemcitabine alone, it resulted in more serious side effects.”


Bristol-Myers Teams with Celgene to Explore New Cancer Treatments

Editor’s note: Two large drug companies are teaming up to combine their drugs to fight breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, and lung cancer. The two drugs are nivolumab (Opdivo) and nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane). The companies will enroll volunteer patients in clinical trials to test how effective the combo is.

“Bristol-Myers Squibb’s determination to get its Opdivo immunotherapy into the U.S. market as a cancer medication took a new turn Wednesday. The firm said it is teaming with biotechnology giant Celgene Corp. to develop a treatment to fight certain types of  tumors using the drug.

“The plan is for Bristol-Myers BMY  to try and combine its immunotherapy treatment with Celgene’s CELG  chemotherapy drug Abraxane in clinical trials with patients suffering from certain types of cancer of the breast, pancreas and lungs.

“Bristol-Myers and Celgene are examining to see whether the combination of the two drugs will produce a stronger tumor combatant than either drug acting alone.”


Novel Immune-Based Cancer Drug Imprime PGG Appears Effective in Certain Lung Cancer Patients

Adding the drug Imprime PGG to chemotherapy and antibody therapy may be effective for certain patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Imprime PGG contains a molecule called beta glucan, which can stimulate the body’s immune cells to destroy cancer cells. This process may be especially effective in patients with high levels of immune system proteins that bind to beta glucan, so-called antibeta glucan antibodies. In a recent clinical trial, patients with advanced NSCLC received the antibody drug cetuximab (Erbitux) and the chemotherapy agents carboplatin (Paraplatin) and paclitaxel (Taxol/Abraxane), and some were also given Imprime PGG. While survival across all patients was not affected by Imprime PGG treatment, it was increased in Imprime PGG-treated patients with high levels of antibeta glucan antibodies. Seventeen percent of these patients survived 3 years or more, while none of the other patient groups did.


Four-Drug Combination Shown to Be Safe and Effective for NSCLC

A combination of the drugs carboplatin (Paraplatin), paclitaxel (Taxol/Abraxane), cetuximab (Erbitux), and bevacizumab (Avastin) has demonstrated effectiveness against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a phase II clinical trial. One hundred two patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC received the four-drug combo as a first-line treatment. Tumors shrank in 56% of patients and stopped growing in an additional 21%. Patients went an average of 7 months without their cancer progressing; the average survival time was 15 months. Four treatment-related deaths occurred, including two due to hemorrhage (heavy bleeding), which can be a rare but serious effect of Avastin treatment. This side effect profile was within the predefined safety margin. A phase III trial further investigating this drug combination for NSCLC is currently enrolling participants.


Erbitux-Avastin Combination Plus Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer Is Safe and Effective

Combining cetuximab (Erbitux), bevacizumab (Avastin), and traditional chemotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) appeared to be safe and effective in a phase II clinical trial. Patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC received Erbitux and Avastin in addition to carboplatin (Paraplatin) and paclitaxel (Taxol/Abraxane) as first-line treatment, followed by maintenance treatment with Erbitux and Avastin. Tumors shrank in 56% of patients and stopped growing in an additional 21%. Serious side effects were relatively rare; the rate was comparable to that of either Erbitux or Avastin alone. Both Erbitux and Avastin have shown efficacy in NSCLC by themselves, but may be more effective when given together. An ongoing phase III clinical trial will further investigate this drug combination.


Alimta Offers Only Limited Advantage in Lung Cancer Study

The recent PointBreak clinical trial compared two treatment regimens for non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Previously untreated patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC received initial treatment with carboplatin (Paraplatin), bevacizumab (Avastin), and either pemetrexed (Alimta) or paclitaxel (Taxol/Abraxane). The Alimta-treated group was then given maintenance treatment with Alimta and Avastin, while the other patients received Avastin only. Alimta treatment was associated with slightly longer times until the cancer progressed again (average 6.0 months, compared to 5.6 in the Alimta-free regimen). However, overall survival did not differ between the groups. The two regimens differed in what specific side effect were most common, but had similar overall toxicities and were generally tolerable.


New Cancer Drug Reolysin Shrinks Lung Tumors

Interim results from a phase II clinical trial of the new cancer drug Reolysin in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the lung, a type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), show that tumors shrank in 23 of 25 patients. The patients had SCC that had spread from its original site, or recurred after treatment, and were treated with the chemotherapy drugs Paraplatin (carboplatin) and Taxol/Abraxane (paclitaxel) in addition to Reolysin. Ten patients experienced tumor shrinkage and 13 experienced stable disease, while the cancer progressed in 2 patients. On average, tumors shrank by a third of their original size. Reolysin consists of a modified form of a virus that selectively attacks cancer cells, while producing no symptoms in most healthy people.