Breast Cancer Patients Forego Post-Surgery Treatment Due to Mistrust, Study Suggests

Excerpt:

“Nearly one-third of women with breast cancer went against their doctor’s advice and chose not to begin or complete the recommended adjuvant anti-cancer therapy to kill residual tumor cells following surgery, according to a study led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researcher.

“A survey that included 2,754 breast cancer patients in Florida and Pennsylvania during a two-year period found that this ‘treatment discordance’ – not following a doctor’s recommended treatment plan in its entirety – was more likely among patients who reported a general distrust of medical institutions and insurers. The patients’ trust or distrust of their own doctors did not seem to be a factor.”

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Adjuvant Ipilimumab in Melanoma: Future in Doubt

Excerpt:

“The future of adjuvant ipilimumab (Yervoy, Bristol-Myers Squibb) for the treatment of resected stage III melanoma could be in doubt, as a combination of ‘astronomically high’ costs and better outcome data with another treatment threaten its position as the standard of care, argues an expert.

“Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that blocks CTLA-4, was shown to significantly improve recurrence-free and overall survival vs placebo when used after surgery. These data, from the EORTC 18071 trial, led to its approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an adjuvant therapy for patients with stage III melanoma in October 2015. This extended its original approval in 2011 to treat late-stage melanoma in patients who are not candidates for surgery.”

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Adjuvant Temozolomide in 1p/19q Non-Codeleted Anaplastic Glioma

Excerpt:

“Interim results of the phase III CATNON trial (EORTC study 26053-22054) indicate a survival benefit of adjuvant temozolomide in 1p/19q non-codeleted anaplastic glioma. These findings were reported in The Lancet by van den Bent et al.

“In the open-label 2 x 2 factorial trial, 745 adult patients with newly diagnosed disease were randomized 1:1:1:1 between December 2007 and September 2015 to receive radiotherapy (59.4 Gy in 33 fractions of 1.8 Gy) alone (n = 187) or with (n = 185) adjuvant temozolomide (12 4-week cycles of 150–200 mg/m² given on days 1–5) or to receive radiotherapy with concurrent temozolomide at 75 mg/m²/d with (n = 188) or without (n = 185) adjuvant temozolomide.”

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Panel Backs Bone Drugs for Postmenopausal Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Appropriately selected postmenopausal women with breast cancer warrant consideration for adjuvant bisphosphonate therapy, according to an updated clinical guideline.

“Either zoledronic acid (Zometa) or clodronate may be considered for adjuvant therapy, as data supporting use of other bisphosphonates remain limited. The RANK ligand-targeted monoclonal antibody denosumab (Xgeva) did not make the cut as recommended therapy because of a lack of long-term survival data to support its use.

” ‘Data for adjuvant denosumab look promising but are currently insufficient to make any recommendation,’ concluded a panel of experts representing the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and Cancer Care Ontario.”

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The Case for Bone-Directed Adjuvant Therapy in Postmenopausal Early Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“A duration of endocrine therapy beyond 5 years has gained traction in the treatment of endocrine receptor (ER)-positive early-stage breast cancer. Long-term use of aromatase inhibitors (AIs), however, may increase the risk of bone loss and bone fracture. Data suggest that the use of bone-targeted agents can substantially reduce the risk of osteoporotic complications associated with AI use, and even reduce the risk of bone recurrence in postmenopausal women with early-stage breast cancer.”

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Targeted Therapy Can Delay Recurrence of Intermediate-Stage Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“The targeted therapy gefitinib appears more effective in preventing recurrence after lung cancer surgery than the standard of care, chemotherapy. In a phase III clinical trial, patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive, stage II-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received gefitinib went about 10 months longer without recurrence than patients who received chemotherapy. The study will be presented at the upcoming 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago.

” ‘Adjuvant gefitinib may ultimately be considered as an important option for stage II-IIIA lung cancer patients with an active EGFR mutation, and we may consider routine EGFR testing in this earlier stage of lung cancer,’ said lead study author Yi-Long Wu, MD, a director of the Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, China. ‘We intend to follow these patients until we can fully measure overall survival as opposed to disease-free survival, which just measures disease recurrence.’ ”

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Tailored, Dense-Dose Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer Does Not Result in Significant Improvement

Excerpt:

“Among women with high-risk early breast cancer, the use of tailored dose-dense chemotherapy compared with standard adjuvant chemotherapy did not result in a statistically significant improvement in breast cancer recurrence-free survival, and nonhematologic toxic effects were more frequent in the tailored dose-dense group, according to a study appearing in the November 8 issue of JAMA.

“Dose-dense therapy, defined as delivery of chemotherapy at shorter intervals without increasing the cumulative dose, has been suggested as a means to improve efficacy of chemotherapy for early . Dosing of most is calculated based on body surface area, which leads to large interpatient variability in toxic effects and efficacy. Whether tailored dosing can improve outcomes is unknown, as is the role of dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy.”

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Adjuvant Ipilimumab Improves Survival in High-Risk Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Patients with stage III melanoma who were considered to be at high risk for recurrence derived an overall survival benefit from adjuvant treatment with ipilimumab (Yervoy), although it came at the price of considerable toxicity, according to updated survival results from the phase III European Organisation for Research and Treatment (EORTC) 18071 trial. The results were presented at the 2016 European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress by Alexander Eggermont, MD, Director General of the Institut Gustave Roussy in Villejuif, France, and simultaneously published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

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Prolonged Survival With Adjuvant Ipilimumab in Stage 3 Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Patients with completely resected stage 3 melanoma who received adjuvant treatment with ipilimumab (Yervoy, Bristol-Myers Squibb) lived longer than those who received placebo, show the latest results from the CA184-029 (EORTC 18071) study.

“This is the first time such a clear survival benefit has been seen with adjuvant therapy in the patient population, commented lead researcher Alexander M.M. Eggermont, MD, PhD, director general, Cancer Institute Gustave Roussy in Villejuif, France, noting that previous trials with adjuvant interferon have suggested a survival benefit, but only in some subgroups of patients.”

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