EBCC-10 NEWS: Chemotherapy Every Two Weeks for Premenopausal Breast Cancer Patients Improves Survival and Does Not Increase Risk of Early Menopause

“Amsterdam, The Netherlands: Premenopausal women with breast cancer have a better chance of survival if they are given cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy closer together, every two weeks rather than every three weeks. Furthermore, this regimen, known as “dose-dense” adjuvant chemotherapy, does not seem to be associated with an increased risk of treatment induced early menopause.

“The findings will be presented today (Thursday) at the 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-10) and the researchers say they are important for helping younger breast cancer patients and their doctors to make better-informed decisions about the choice of chemotherapy regimens that are given in addition to other treatments such as surgery, hormone therapy and radiotherapy.

“Dr Matteo Lambertini, MD, a medical oncologist at IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, National Institute for Cancer Research, Genoa, Italy [1], and at the Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels, Belgium, will tell the conference: ‘Our results confirm the superiority of dose-dense chemotherapy as compared to standard interval regimens in premenopausal patients at higher risk of relapse, and its use should be implemented in Europe, as it is in the United States.’ ”


ASCO Recommends Ovarian Suppression for ER-Positive Breast Cancer

“An American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) expert panel issued an updated guideline recommending that higher-risk premenopausal women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer receive ovarian suppression in addition to adjuvant endocrine therapy. Lower-risk patients, however, should not receive ovarian suppression.

“ ‘In the past year, randomized trials with robust methodological designs have analyzed the effect of ovarian suppression among premenopausal women with ER-positive breast cancers treated with tamoxifen,’ wrote the panel, led by ASCO expert Harold J. Burstein, MD, PhD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. In the past, studies of this therapy have suffered from problems such as selection criteria confounding.

“The guideline update is based on four randomized controlled trials. These include the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 3193 (E-3193) trial, the Suppression of Ovarian Function Trial (SOFT), the Tamoxifen and Exemestane Trial (TEXT), and the Austrian Breast Cancer Study Group (ABCSG)-12 trial. Overall, the studies did not find a significant difference with regard to overall survival between tamoxifen alone, tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression, or aromatase inhibitors (AIs) plus ovarian suppression. The guideline update was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.”


The Growing Arsenal of Immunotherapy Drugs for Melanoma


Large numbers of immune cells (T cells in particular) are frequently found within or adjacent to melanoma tumors, indicating that the tumors attract the attention—if not the action—of the immune system. True to its reputation as one of the most ‘immunogenic‘ cancers, melanoma now has more U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved immunotherapy (immune system-targeting) drugs than any other cancer type. As a consequence, metastatic melanoma is no longer the universally fatal disease it was even just 3 or 4 years ago. Continue reading…


Breast Cancer Drugs Battle Disease's Return

“A pair of drugs already on the market appear to reduce the recurrence of breast cancer in women who’ve already undergone treatment, two new clinical trials show.

“The chemotherapy drug capecitabine (Xeloda) seems to reduce by nearly a third the risk of breast cancer recurrence if women receive the drug following surgery to remove their cancer, researchers were to report Wednesday at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

“In addition, an osteoporosis medication called denosumab appears to reduce recurrence risk by 18 percent in women who have HR-positive breast cancer, a second study reports.”


Women with Luminal A Subtype of Breast Cancer Did Not Benefit from Adjuvant Chemotherapy

“Premenopausal women whose invasive breast cancers were of the luminal A subtype had comparable 10-year disease-free survival rates regardless of whether or not they received adjuvant chemotherapy, according to data from the phase III DBCG77B clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12.

” ‘Luminal A is a relatively common subtype of breast cancer, and is defined by high expression of hormone receptors [estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR)], and low expression of the cell-growth marker Ki67 and the oncoprotein HER2. It is the form of breast cancer with the best prognosis,’ said Torsten Nielsen, MD, PhD, professor of pathology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada.

” ‘We wanted to address the clinical question of whether or not women with molecularly low-risk luminal A breast cancer actually benefit from chemotherapy,’ added Nielsen. ‘Instead of starting a new trial and waiting for 10 years to find answers, we used an older, completed trial that had saved tissue samples for future studies.’ “


To Type or to Print? Oncotype DX and Mamma/BluePrint Tests for Breast Cancer


Women diagnosed with localized breast cancer face difficult decisions with their doctors. What kind of neoadjuvant (before surgery) treatment to choose? Should chemotherapy follow surgery? Based on the subtype of breast cancer, should specific chemotherapy drugs be used? Continue reading…


Bristol-Myers Squibb Receives Approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Yervoy (ipilimumab) as Adjuvant Treatment for Fully Resected Stage III Melanoma

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company BMY, -0.27% today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Yervoy (ipilimumab) 10 mg/kg for the adjuvant treatment of patients with cutaneous melanoma with pathologic involvement of regional lymph nodes of more than 1 mm who have undergone complete resection including total lymphadenectomy. This approval is based on clinical data from a pivotal Phase 3 trial, CA184-029 (EORTC 18071), which demonstrated Yervoy 10 mg/kg significantly improved recurrence-free survival (RFS) vs. placebo in this setting, with a 25 percent reduction in the risk of recurrence or death. The median RFS was 26 months (95% ci:19)(95% ci:39) for Yervoy vs. 17 months (95% ci:13)(95% ci:22) for placebo (hazard ratio [HR]=0.75; 95% CI: 0.64, 0.90; p<0.002). Yervoy is the first and only FDA-approved immune checkpoint inhibitor in the adjuvant treatment for fully resected Stage III melanoma (lymph node >1 mm).”


Sequential Anthracycline-Cyclophosphamide, Taxane Regimen 'Most Effective' Adjuvant Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

“Sequential anthracycline-cyclophosphamide and taxane may serve as the best available adjuvant therapy regimen for early-stage breast cancer regardless of hormone receptor status, according to the results of a systemic review and network meta-analysis.

“Many different adjuvant chemotherapy regimens exist for early-stage breast cancer; however, a conventional meta-analysis would not allow for comparison of all of these regimens, according to researchers.

“ ‘It is well established that adjuvant chemotherapy plays an important role in reducing the risk for recurrence and improving the survival of patients with breast cancer,’ Naoto T. Ueno, MD, PhD, chief of the section of translational breast cancer research at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and colleagues wrote. ‘The National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines for the treatment of breast cancer describe numerous recommended adjuvant chemotherapy regimens … of them, sequential anthracycline-cyclophosphamide and taxane (AC-T) is the most commonly accepted standard regimen. However, two types of regimens without anthracyclines may have efficacy similar to or greater than that of sequential AC-T.’ “


Postprostatectomy Radiation Therapy Yields Low Toxicity and Favorable Patient-Reported Quality of Life

“A prospective study of guideline-based, postoperative, image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with prostate cancer found low toxicity profiles and favorable patient-reported quality of life following treatment, with researchers concluding that toxicity and health-related quality of life should not impact the recommendation of radiation therapy following prostatectomy. The research was published by Berlin et al in Practical Radiation Oncology.

“Postprostatectomy radiation therapy has been reported as underutilized, with randomized trials showing the benefit of adjuvant radiation therapy, but only about 10% of patients receiving the treatment. One potential reason for underutilization could be concern over side effects or a negative impact on health-related quality of life.”