New Targeted Alpha Therapy Protocol for Advanced Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Therapy options are limited for men with advanced-stage, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), but a new treatment protocol offers hope. In the featured article of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine‘s October issue, German researchers report on their recent clinical experience, which establishes a dosing regimen for actinium-225 (225Ac)-labeled targeted alpha therapy of patients with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-positive tumors. The protocol balances treatment response with toxicity concerns to provide the most effective therapy with the least side effects.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Pfizer’s Xtandi fails in progression trial vs. J&J’s Zytiga

Excerpt:

A late-stage trial found that continuing treatment with Pfizer Inc’s cancer drug Xtandi in addition to a regimen of Zytiga and a steroid worked no better than the two other drugs alone in patients with advanced prostate cancer whose disease had worsened, the company said on Wednesday.

“Zytiga, or abiraterone acetate, is sold by Johnson & Johnson.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Flawed Study of Advanced Prostate Cancer Spreads False Alarm

Excerpt:

“Bad news for men popped up in news media all over the country this week, based on a study from Northwestern University reporting that cases of advanced, aggressive prostate cancer had risen sharply from 2004 to 2013.

“Newsweek, NBC, CBS, Fox News and United Press International were among the organizations that covered the study. The reports suggested that recent medical advice against routine screening might be to blame for the apparent increase in advanced cases, by leading to delays in diagnosis until the cancer reached a late stage. Another factor cited was the possibility that prostate cancer had somehow become more aggressive.

“But the frightening news appears to be a false alarm — the product of a study questioned by other researchers but promoted with an incendiary news release and initially reported by some news media with little or no analysis from outside experts.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


Prostate Cancer: Unexpected Results from International Phase III Study

Excerpt:

“A recently published international clinical Phase III trial of a promising drug for treating advanced prostate cancer ended with surprising results: the new therapeutic agent failed to achieve any significant improvement in the overall survival of patients compared with the established standard treatment. This and other data from the study have now been published in the leading magazine Journal of Clinical Oncology. Researchers from MedUni Vienna played a significant part in the study. The study was coordinated by the recently nominated ‘best hospital’ in the USA, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) of Harvard Medical School.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


Study Suggests Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Should Be Tested for Inherited Mutations

Excerpt:

“Inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes, such as the BRCA genes, can increase cancer risk. A new study shows that DNA-repair mutations are significantly more common in men with metastatic prostate cancer compared with men whose prostate cancer hasn’t spread. This suggests all men with advanced prostate cancer should be tested for inherited DNA-repair mutations to help select the most effective therapies and provide information on family risk.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


Presence of AR-V7 in Circulating Tumor Cells Validated as Predictive Biomarker for Advanced Prostate Cancer Treatment by Memorial Sloan Kettering and Epic Sciences

Excerpt:

“Detecting AR-V7 positive tumor cells circulating in the blood of an advanced prostate cancer patient predicts that he will not only fail the commonly-prescribed androgen receptor signaling inhibitors (ARSI), abiraterone and enzalutamide, but that he will survive significantly longer if treated with a taxane based chemotherapy regimen.

“This discovery, published today in JAMA Oncology, emerged from a study of 161 progressing metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients about to start an FDA approved ARSIs or taxane as a first, second or third line treatment at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK). Blood samples taken along with those routinely collected from the patients were analyzed on the Epic Sciences’ liquid biopsy platform for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) with the AR-V7 biomarker. Overall, almost 20% of patients had AR-V7 positive CTCs.

” ‘The percentage of men that responds to ARSIs is highest in the first line setting, decreasing steadily as more treatments are given. We found that a novel liquid biopsy for AR-V7 was able to identify, with specificity, patients who will not benefit from these therapies and should instead start chemotherapy independent of the line of therapy being administered,’ said Howard Scher, M.D., chief of the genitourinary oncology services at MSK and corresponding author for the study.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


Steroid Use With Abiraterone Offers Multidimensional Benefits to Patients With mCRPC

Excerpt:

“For decades, the standard of care for men with advanced prostate cancer has been the depletion or inhibition of androgens. While androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) often results in temporary tumor regression or symptom relief in some patients, disease progression ultimately occurs over time. For patients with metastatic disease, the median overall survival (OS), until very recently, had been less than 2 years after chemotherapy.

“While tumor progression with ADT was previously believed to be hormone-refractory or androgen-independent, a large body of evidence supports that metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is commonly driven by elevated steroid synthesis, increased expression or splice variants of the androgen receptor (AR), or AR ligand promiscuity, indicating the ongoing need for targeted androgen therapies.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


Promising Drug Combination for Advanced Prostate Cancer

“A new drug combination may be effective in treating men with metastatic prostate cancer. Preliminary results of this new approach are encouraging and have led to an ongoing international study being conducted in 196 hospitals worldwide.

” ‘We hope to find a well-tolerated and effective treatment to slow the progression of prostate cancer in men with advanced prostate cancer. The approach combines several drugs and attacks the cancer on several fronts,’ said Dr. Fred Saad, researcher at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) and principal investigator of the study.

“Antonio Paris, 59, is one of the patients participating in the CRCHUM. “Since I started the new treatment 14 months ago, my cancer first remitted and now is stable,” he said.”


Landmark Clinical Trial Shows Gene-Targeted Drug Can Treat Prostate Cancer

“A pioneering drug developed to treat women with inherited cancers can also benefit men with advanced prostate cancer, a major new clinical trial concludes.

“The trial is a milestone in cancer treatment as the first to show the benefits of ‘precision medicine’ in prostate cancer – with treatment matched to the particular genetic characteristics of a man’s tumour.

“Olaparib, the world’s first drug to reach the market targeted against inherited cancer mutations, was found to benefit as many as a third of patients with prostate cancer, including many who did not inherit cancer genes but whose tumours had acquired defects in DNA repair.”