ESMO 2017 Press Release: Study in Early Stage Breast Cancer Shows That Even Small Tumours Can Be Aggressive

Excerpt:

“Even small tumours can be aggressive, according to a study in patients with early stage breast cancer that will be presented at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid. Researchers found that nearly one in four small tumours were aggressive and patients benefited from chemotherapy. Aggressive tumours could be identified by a 70-gene signature.

” ‘Our results challenge the assumption that all small tumours are less serious and do not need adjuvant chemotherapy,’ said lead author Dr Konstantinos Tryfonidis, a researcher at the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), Brussels, Belgium.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Drug Combination Slows Breast Cancer Spread

“A combination of two drugs delays progression of advanced, aggressive breast cancer by an average of nine months – working in all subsets of the most common type of breast cancer.

“The combination – of a first-in-class targeted drug called palbociclib, and the hormone drug fulvestrant – slowed cancer growth in around two-thirds of women with advanced forms of the most common type of breast cancer.

“The combination allowed many women with metastatic hormone-receptor-positive, HER2-negative cancer to delay the start of chemotherapy, which is the traditional treatment option in these patients once hormone drugs have stopped working.”


Beta Blockers May Lead to New Novel Triple Negative Breast Cancer Treatments

“New research published in the March 2016 issue of The FASEB Journal, shows that a commonly prescribed class of high blood pressure drugs may have the potential to slow the growth of triple negative breast cancer tumors. These drugs, called ‘beta blockers’ work by counteracting the pro-growth effect caused by adrenaline by affecting the the beta2-adrenoceptor.

” ‘Previous studies have linked increased stress with accelerated onset of metastasis in some forms of breast cancer,’ said Michelle L. Halls, Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Drug Discovery Biology Theme at Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Monash University in Parkville, Victoria, Australia. ‘By understanding how stress accelerates invasion in aggressive breast tumor cells, this work will inform future studies into whether beta-blockers could be a useful adjuvant therapy in the treatment of some aggressive breast cancers.’ “