Thousands of Men with Prostate Cancer Get Risky Treatment They Don’t Need. New Approaches Could Curb That

Excerpt:

“They look like glowing jade necklaces of such unearthly brilliance they could be a Ming emperor’s. But if Dr. Gerardo Fernandez is right, the green fluorescent images of prostate cells could be even more valuable, at least to the thousands of men every year who unnecessarily undergo aggressive treatment for prostate cancer.

“That’s because the glimmering images promise to show which prostate cancers are destined to remain harmless for the rest of a man’s life, and thus might spare many patients treatment that can cause impotence and incontinence.”

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Markers for Prostate Cancer Death Can Identify Men in Need of More Aggressive Treatment

Excerpt:

“Prostate cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of male cancer death in the United States with an estimated 26,000 deaths in 2016. Two-thirds of all PC deaths observed in the US are men with localized disease who developed metastasis. Several markers for dying from prostate cancer exist, but whether these are markers for telling who is likely to die early from any cause, and how their performance compares, is unknown. Identifying such a marker is important because we can then identify which men may benefit from new, more aggressive treatments for prostate cancer.”

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Study: For Men with Prostate Cancer, Emotional Distress May Lead to More Aggressive Treatment

Excerpt:

“The anxiety many men experience after being diagnosed with prostate cancer may lead them to choose potentially unnecessary treatment options, researchers from the University at Buffalo and Roswell Park Cancer Institute report in a new study.

” ‘Emotional distress may motivate men with low-risk prostate cancer to choose more aggressive treatment, such as choosing surgery over active surveillance,’ said UB’s Heather Orom, the lead author on the study, published in the February issue of the Journal of Urology.”

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Men Who Forgo Aggressive Treatment for Prostate Cancer Don't Receive Appropriate Monitoring

“An increasing number of men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer are opting for active surveillance – closely monitoring their cancer – rather than aggressive treatment to avoid the debilitating potential side effects of surgery and radiation, such as erectile and urinary dysfunction.

“However, a new study by UCLA researchers has found that less than 5 percent of men who chose to forgo aggressive treatment are being monitored as closely as they should be, putting them in danger of their cancer progressing or metastasizing without their knowledge.

“The study, published today in the peer-reviewed journal Cancer, examined the records of 37,687 men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 2004 to 2007 who were followed through 2009. They found that of the 3,656 men diagnosed with prostate cancer who did not undergo aggressive treatment, only 166 men, or 4.5 percent, were being monitored appropriately, said Dr. Karim Chamie, the study’s first author and an assistant professor of urology at UCLA.”


MRI Tied to More Aggressive Breast Cancer Treatment

“The use of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer has increased by eightfold during the past 10 years in Canada’s most populous province and is associated with significant increases in adverse downstream consequences, including more mastectomies, a population-based study indicates.

“The research was published online September 24 in JAMA Oncology.

“Angel Arnaout, MD, University of Ottawa, in Ontario, and colleagues found that 14.8% of a cohort of 53,015 women treated with newly diagnosed breast cancer between 2003 and 2012 had undergone pMRI in the province of Ontario.

“A total of 65% of the cohort underwent breast-conserving surgery.”


Study Finds Misperceptions About Impact of Double Mastectomy

“A survey of women with breast cancer found that nearly half considered having a double mastectomy. But of those who considered it, only 37 percent knew that the more aggressive procedure does not improve survival for women with breast cancer.

“Among women who received a double mastectomy, 36 percent believed it would improve their survival. Studies have shown that for women at average risk of a second cancer, removing the unaffected breast does not meaningfully improve survival.

“The study, which was presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, looked at 1,949 women who had been treated for . About 20 percent of the women surveyed had both breasts removed, a procedure called contralateral prophylactic mastectomy. Even among patients without a genetic mutation or family history that might put them at risk of developing cancer in the other breast, 19 percent had double mastectomy.”


Surgery Doesn't Help Women With Early-Stage Breast Carcinoma

“What to do about the non-invasive breast lesions called ductal carcinoma in situ, or ‘stage zero’ cancer, is one of the hottest debates in breast cancer care.

“Because of more widespread screening, more and more women are being diagnosed with DCIS. The condition now makes up 20 percent of new breast cancer cases, according to the American Cancer Society.

“DCIS doesn’t always progress to invasive breast cancer, which is the life-threatening kind. In fact, some physicians and researchers, including a working group convened by the National Cancer Institute, say it’s not accurate to call DCIS a form of cancer at all, and that the terminology is contributing to overly aggressive treatment.”


New Screening Method for Prostate Cancer Recurrence

“The American Cancer Society estimated that 220,800 new cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2015. Approximately 27,540 men will die of the disease, accounting for 5 percent of all cancer deaths.

“A common treatment for prostate cancer is a , in which all or part of the is removed. Recent studies have shown that this procedure is often over-prescribed. As early as 2010, the New England Journal of Medicine reported that such a procedure extended the lives of just 1 patient in 48. Side effects from the surgery, including urinary incontinence and impotence, can affect the quality of life of the patient.

” ‘For every 20 surgery procedures to take out the prostate, it is estimated that only one life is saved,’ said Gabriel Popescu, director of the Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory (QLI) and senior author on the study. ‘For the other 19 people, they would be better left alone, because with removing the prostate, the quality of life goes down dramatically. So if you had a tool that could tell which patient will actually be more likely to have a bad outcome, then you could more aggressively treat that case.’ ”


New Research Points to Potential for Measuring Aggressiveness of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

The gist: New research shows that it may soon be possible to measure how aggressive a patient’s triple-negative breast cancer might be. Patients with aggressive cancer might benefit from different treatment approaches from those prescribed for patients with less aggressive cancer. The new technique looks at patterns of “DNA methylation” in a tumor. In DNA methylation, molecules called methyl groups become attached to DNA molecules in distinctive patterns. The new research shows that certain DNA methylation patterns can indicate whether a tumor is likely to be aggressive.

“Australian researchers have identified epigenetic ‘signatures’ that could help clinicians tell the difference between highly aggressive and more benign forms of triple-negative breast cancer.

“The new study, published in Nature Communications, compares the breast cancer DNA ‘methylome’ with that of healthy individuals. The methylome provides a new picture of the genome and shows how it is epigenetically ‘decorated’ with methyl groups, a process known as DNA ‘methylation’.

“The study reveals ‘distinct methylation patterns’ in the primary biopsy breast cancer cells indicating better or worse prognosis.

“Triple-negative breast cancers, which make up 15-20% of all breast cancers, lack any of the three receptors (oestrogen, progesterone or HER2) that would make them responsive to targeted drugs. Overall, patients have a higher risk of disease recurrence and shorter survival than those with other breast cancers.

“Triple-negative breast cancer patients tend to fall into two categories: those that succumb to their disease within 3-5 years, regardless of treatment; and those that remain disease free for longer than the average non-triple-negative breast cancer patient (at least 8 years post-diagnosis).”