ALEX Trial Results Show Alectinib Further Outpacing Crizotinib in ALK+ NSCLC

Excerpt:

Updated results of the global phase III ALEX trial comparing alectinib with crizotinib as first-line treatment against ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer show a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 34.8 months in 152 patients treated with alectinib versus 10.9 months in 151 patients treated with crizotinib.

” ‘Think of it like a horse race, only it’s not about who crosses the finish line first, but how far the horses can run,’ says D. Ross Camidge, MD, Ph.D., the Joyce Zeff Chair in Lung Cancer Research at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, director of Thoracic Oncology at the CU School of Medicine, and the study’s first author. ‘In this trial, it’s as if half of the people “riding” crizotinib had exhausted their horses at about 11 months. For patients on alectinib, when this trial first started reporting data last year, more than half were still on their horses, still running. Now enough time has elapsed to estimate the median performance of these alectinib ‘horses’ more accurately.’ ”

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Alectinib Outpaces Crizotinib In Treatment of ALK+ NSCLC Patients in Phase 3 ALEX Trial

Excerpt:

“At the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, researchers announced updated results from the phase 3 ALEX trial which compared alectinib with crizotinib for the treatment of those with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

“The results reveal that 152 patients treated with alectinib showed a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 34.8 months compared with just 10.9 months in the 151 patients who were treated with crizotinib.”

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FDA Grants Priority Review to Lorlatinib in ALK-Positive NSCLC

Excerpt:

“On February 12, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) accepted and granted Priority Review to Pfizer’s new drug application for lorlatinib. The Prescription Drug User Fee Act goal date for a decision by the FDA is in August 2018.

“Lorlatinib is an investigational, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitor for the treatment of patients with ALK-positive metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) previously treated with one or more ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It has been shown to be highly active in preclinical lung cancer models harboring chromosomal rearrangements of both ALK and ROS1. Lorlatinib was specifically designed to inhibit tumor mutations that drive resistance to other ALK inhibitors and to penetrate the blood-brain barrier.”

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FDA Approves Roche’s Alecensa (Alectinib) as First-Line Treatment for People With Specific Type of Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for Alecensa® (alectinib) for the treatment of people with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as detected by an FDA-approved test. The approval is based on results from the phase III ALEX study, which showed Alecensa significantly reduced the risk of disease worsening or death (progression-free survival, PFS) by 47% (HR=0.53, 95% CI: 0.38, 0.73, p<0.0001) compared to crizotinib as assessed by independent review committee (IRC). Median PFS was 25.7 months (95% CI: 19.9, not estimable) for people who received Alecensa compared with 10.4 months (95% CI: 7.7, 14.6) for people who received crizotinib. The safety profile of Alecensa was consistent with that observed in previous studies. The study also showed that Alecensa significantly reduced the risk of the cancer spreading to or growing in the brain or central nervous system (CNS) compared to crizotinib by 84% (HR=0.16, 95% CI: 0.10, 0.28, p<0.0001). This was based on a time to CNS progression analysis in which there was a lower risk of progression in the CNS as the first site of disease progression for people who received Alecensa (12%) compared to people who received crizotinib (45%).”

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Lorlatinib Highly Effective for Relapsed ALK or ROS1 Rearranged NSCLC

Excerpt:

“While several targeted therapies have emerged in recent years for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) carrying the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusion, development of resistance to ALK inhibitors is an increasing problem. Furthermore, only one tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), crizotinib, is currently approved for patients with ROS proto-oncogene 1 (ROS1) rearrangements. Lorlatinib, a novel, highly selective ALK and ROS1 targeting third-generation TKI has shown preclinical activity against known ALK resistance mutations and can penetrate the central nervous system (CNS), a common site of metastasis in ALK-positive or ROS1-positive NSCLC.”

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Pfizer Presents Full Results From Phase 2 Study of Next-Generation Investigational Alk-Inhibitor Lorlatinib in ALK-Positive and ROS1-Positive Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE) today announced full results from the Phase 2 clinical trial of the investigational, next-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor lorlatinib that exhibited clinically meaningful activity against lung tumors and brain metastases in a range of patients with ALK-positive and ROS1-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including those who were heavily pretreated. Further, side effects were generally manageable and primarily mild to moderate in severity. The results [Abstract #OA 05.06] were presented by Professor Benjamin Solomon, lead investigator and medical oncologist at Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia, today during an oral session at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 18th World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) in Yokohama, Japan. Pfizer will also present data from several other lung cancer clinical programs.”

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Ipilimumab Shows Promise in Mutated NSCLC, but Toxicities May Limit Use

Excerpt:

“The addition of ipilimumab to targeted therapy for the treatment of EGFR- and ALK-mutated non-small cell lung cancer demonstrated improved survival despite dose-dependent toxicities, according to results from a phase 1b trial presented at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.

“Ipilimumab (Yervoy, Bristol-Myers Squibb), a CTLA-4 inhibitor, has demonstrated long-term responses in patients with melanoma; however, the drug is associated with a high rate of grade 3 and grade 4 immune-related adverse events.”

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Roche Presents Data From Global Phase III Study Showing Significant Clinical Benefit of Alecensa (Alectinib) in Later-Line Advanced ALK-Positive Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced results from the global phase III ALUR study showing that Alecensa® significantly reduced the risk of disease worsening or death (progression-free survival, PFS) by 85% compared to chemotherapy in patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who had progressed following treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy and crizotinib (hazard ratio [HR]=0.15, 95% CI: 0.08-0.29, p<0.001). Median PFS reported by the investigators, the primary endpoint of the study, was 9.6 months in patients who received Alecensa (95% CI: 6.9-12.2) compared with 1.4 months (95% CI: 1.3-1.6) in those who received chemotherapy. Median PFS assessed by an independent review committee (IRC), a secondary endpoint, was 7.1 months for patients who received Alecensa versus 1.6 months for patients who received chemotherapy (HR=0.32, 95% CI 0.17–0.59; p<0.001). The safety profile of Alecensa was consistent with that observed in previous studies and compared favourably to chemotherapy.”

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Better Results in NSCLC with Higher Dose of ALK Inhibitor

Excerpt:

“Doubling the dose of the ALK inhibitor brigatinib (Alunbrig) improved outcomes in patients with crizotinib (Xalkori)-refractory non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a dose-comparison study showed.

“Patients who started treatment at 90 mg/day and titrated to 180 mg/day had improved response rate (54% versus 45%) and progression-free survival (PFS) as compared with those who received 90 mg throughout the treatment period. Response in brain metastases improved by 50% with the higher dose.”

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