Lung Cancer Highlights from ASCO 2016


This year, the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) did not produce any truly groundbreaking revelations about new treatments for lung cancer. However, researchers did report quite a few positive findings, and some disappointing ones. I have summarized some of the more prominent presentations below. Continue reading…


Research Achieves Significant Progress in the Fight Against Cancer

A report released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) emphasizes the noteworthy progress made in the understanding and treatment of cancer in recent years. Cancer death rates have declined 21% among men and 12% among women since the 1990s. A better understanding of the genetic makeup of different cancers helps guide individualized treatment. Research has also yielded first-ever therapies for several treatment-resistant cancers. Targeted immunotherapy lets patients harness their own immune system to fight their cancer. However, due to a growing and aging population, new cancer cases in the U.S. are predicted to increase 40% by 2030. The report’s authors warn that stagnant funding in the wake of federal budget cuts could stall further advances in cancer research.


Research Achieves Significant Progress in the Fight Against Cancer

A report released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) emphasizes the noteworthy progress made in the understanding and treatment of cancer in recent years. Cancer death rates have declined 21% among men and 12% among women since the 1990s. A better understanding of the genetic makeup of different cancers helps guide individualized treatment. Research has also yielded first-ever therapies for several treatment-resistant cancers. Targeted immunotherapy lets patients harness their own immune system to fight their cancer. However, due to a growing and aging population, new cancer cases in the U.S. are predicted to increase 40% by 2030. The report’s authors warn that stagnant funding in the wake of federal budget cuts could stall further advances in cancer research.


Research Achieves Significant Progress in the Fight Against Cancer

A report released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) emphasizes the noteworthy progress made in the understanding and treatment of cancer in recent years. Cancer death rates have declined 21% among men and 12% among women since the 1990s. A better understanding of the genetic makeup of different cancers helps guide individualized treatment. Research has also yielded first-ever therapies for several treatment-resistant cancers. Targeted immunotherapy lets patients harness their own immune system to fight their cancer. However, due to a growing and aging population, new cancer cases in the U.S. are predicted to increase 40% by 2030. The report’s authors warn that stagnant funding in the wake of federal budget cuts could stall further advances in cancer research.


Cancer Experts Organization Decries Cuts in Biomedical Research Funding

Over 200 medical research advocacy organizations urged the U.S. Congress to invest in biomedical research during the Rally for Medical Research Hill Day. In a statement supporting the event, the president of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) criticized cuts in federal funding for biomedical research. He referenced a recent survey showing that three-quarters of cancer researchers report that the current federal funding situation is negatively impacting their ability to conduct research, more than one-third have had to lay off skilled staff, and many young researchers are choosing to leave the field. These difficulties undermine the promise of recent scientific advances that would otherwise offer the prospect of significant progress against cancer.