Expert Examines Immunotherapy Potential in Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Several ongoing clinical trials are examining the efficacy and safety of immunotherapy agents in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), explains David P. Carbone, MD, PhD.

“Two early phase studies have already shown encouraging results. In the phase I/II CheckMate-032 trial, pretreated patients with SCLC received monotherapy with the PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab (Opdivo) or the combination of nivolumab plus the CTLA-4 inhibitor ipilimumab (Yervoy). Data showed that the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 3.35 months with the combination and 1.38 months with nivolumab alone. Median OS was 7.75 months with the combination and 3.55 months with single-agent therapy. The objective response rate (ORR) with the combination was 31.1%.

“In the phase Ib KEYNOTE-028 trial, the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda) had an ORR of 29.2% (95% CI, 12.6-51.1) in patients with SCLC who had prior chemotherapy.”

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Clinical Trial Versus Standard Protocol: Why and How to Enroll in a Trial


My job at Cancer Commons is to help cancer patients better understand and make decisions about their treatment. Through our Ask Cancer Commons service, I also strive to inform patients about new drugs in trials that they can discuss with their oncologists. Sometimes, I explain the rationale behind a patient’s current or upcoming treatment, and sometimes I try to convince patients to actually get treated, rather than hope that a vegetarian diet and herbal supplements will cure their metastatic disease. Continue reading…


Pembrolizumab Promising in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Results from a phase Ib trial suggest that the programmed death 1 (PD-1) inhibitor pembrolizumab has activity and an acceptable toxicity profile as single-agent therapy in heavily pretreated, advanced triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC).

“ ‘TNBC tumors are frequently of high histological grade, present at an advanced stage, are typically more aggressive and difficult to treat than hormone receptor–positive tumors, and are associated with a higher risk of early relapse,’ wrote study authors led by Rita Nanda, MD, of the University of Chicago. ‘Given the suboptimal outcomes with chemotherapy, new targeted therapies for TNBC are urgently needed.’ ”

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EU Expands Nivolumab Approval for Lung and Kidney Cancer

Excerpt:

“The European Commission has approved new indications for the immunotherapy nivolumab (Opdivo, Bristol-Myers Squibb), expanding its use in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and adding the indication of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

“The drug is already approved in Europe for use in previously treated patients with metastatic squamous NSCLC. Now the indication has been expanded to include non-squamous NSCLC, which represents 85% of the cases of lung cancer, and monotherapy in locally advanced or metastatic disease.

“Nivolumab is the only PD-1 inhibitor that has been approved for a broad range of patients with previously treated metastatic NSCLC, regardless of PD-L1 expression, and nivolumab is the only approved PD-1 inhibitor to demonstrate a better overall survival rate than docetaxel in previously treated metastatic NSCLC, the manufacturer pointed out in a press release.”

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Advaxis Combination Trial with Merck Completes First Two Dose-Escalation Cohorts

Excerpt:

Advaxis, Inc. (ADXS), a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing cancer immunotherapies, and Merck & Co., Inc. (MRK), today announced that they have completed the first two dose-escalation cohorts and launched the third dose-escalation cohort in their KEYNOTE-046 clinical trial. The Phase 1/2 study is evaluating the combination of ADXS-PSA (ADXS31-142) and KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab), the first anti-PD-1 (programmed death receptor-1) therapy approved in the United States, in patients with previously treated, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

“The KEYNOTE-046 trial is the first-in-human study of Advaxis’ Lm immunotherapy candidate for prostate cancer. It is the second study initiated to evaluate the use of KEYTRUDA in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.”

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Talimogene Laherparepvec, Pembrolizumab Combination Safely Treats Advanced Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Patients with advanced unresectable melanoma can safely receive combination therapy with full doses of talimogene laherparepvec and pembrolizumab, according to study results presented at HemOnc TodayMelanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies.

“In previous studies, talimogene laherparepvec (Imlygic, Amgen) — a herpes simplex virus-1-based oncolytic immunotherapy — significantly improved durable response rate in patients with advanced melanoma. Also, pembrolizumab (Keytruda, Merck) — an anti–PD-1 antibody — showed superiority over ipilimumab (Yervoy, Bristol Meyers Squibb) in patients with stage III or IV melanoma.

“Both drugs appeared tolerable and demonstrated nonoverlapping adverse event profiles…”

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Melanoma Therapy Tied to Cutaneous Adverse Events

“Anti-programmed cell death (PD)-1 therapy for metastatic melanoma is associated with the development of immune-related cutaneous events, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

“Shelley Ji Eun Hwang, M.B.B.S., from the University of Sydney, and colleagues reviewed the clinical and histologic information of 82 patients treated with single-agent anti-PD-1 therapy for  at one institution from May 2012 to February 2015.”


FDA Accepts Supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab), Merck’s Anti-PD-1 Therapy, in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Grants Priority Review

“Merck MRK, -0.23% known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted for review the supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for Merck’s anti-PD-1 therapy, KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab), for the treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose disease has progressed on or after platinum-containing chemotherapy and an FDA-approved therapy for EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations, if present. The FDA granted Priority Review with a PDUFA, or target action, date of October 2, 2015; the sBLA will be reviewed under the FDA’s Accelerated Approval program.

“ ‘Today’s announcement reflects our commitment to accelerate the development of immunotherapeutic approaches to treat lung cancer, one of the most deadly malignancies,’ said Dr. Roger M. Perlmutter, president, Merck Research Laboratories. ‘We believe that data submitted to the FDA illustrate the significant potential of KEYTRUDA to treat advanced non-small cell lung cancer – and we look forward to working with the FDA to bring our anti-PD-1 therapy to patients afflicted with this devastating cancer.’ “


Relevancy of PD-L1 as a Biomarker for Immunotherapies in NSCLC

“Despite its initial running start, the continuing development of immunotherapies in the field of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) won’t be slowing down anytime soon, according to Naiyer Rizvi, MD.

“ ‘The field is changing so fast,’ said Rizvi, director of Thoracic Oncology and Immunotherapeutics, Columbia University Medical Center, in an exclusive interview with Targeted Oncology. ‘Soon, we will have a better understanding of the first-line use of PD-1 agents, Then, maybe a year later, the data on the combination of PD-1/PD-L1 and CTLA-4 will come out. It is going to be a busy year. The NCCN [National Comprehensive Cancer Network] is going to be busy rewriting their guidelines every 6 months at this rate.’

“One immunotherapy currently being investigated is the anti–PD-1 agent pembrolizumab (Keytruda), in the KEYNOTE-024 study. The study is looking at pembrolizumab in the first-line setting for patients with stage IV metastatic NSCLC whose tumors express PD-L1.”