Talimogene Laherparepvec, Pembrolizumab Combination Safely Treats Advanced Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Patients with advanced unresectable melanoma can safely receive combination therapy with full doses of talimogene laherparepvec and pembrolizumab, according to study results presented at HemOnc TodayMelanoma and Cutaneous Malignancies.

“In previous studies, talimogene laherparepvec (Imlygic, Amgen) — a herpes simplex virus-1-based oncolytic immunotherapy — significantly improved durable response rate in patients with advanced melanoma. Also, pembrolizumab (Keytruda, Merck) — an anti–PD-1 antibody — showed superiority over ipilimumab (Yervoy, Bristol Meyers Squibb) in patients with stage III or IV melanoma.

“Both drugs appeared tolerable and demonstrated nonoverlapping adverse event profiles…”

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Melanoma Therapy Tied to Cutaneous Adverse Events

“Anti-programmed cell death (PD)-1 therapy for metastatic melanoma is associated with the development of immune-related cutaneous events, according to research published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

“Shelley Ji Eun Hwang, M.B.B.S., from the University of Sydney, and colleagues reviewed the clinical and histologic information of 82 patients treated with single-agent anti-PD-1 therapy for  at one institution from May 2012 to February 2015.”


FDA Accepts Supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab), Merck’s Anti-PD-1 Therapy, in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Grants Priority Review

“Merck MRK, -0.23% known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted for review the supplemental Biologics License Application (sBLA) for Merck’s anti-PD-1 therapy, KEYTRUDA® (pembrolizumab), for the treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose disease has progressed on or after platinum-containing chemotherapy and an FDA-approved therapy for EGFR or ALK genomic tumor aberrations, if present. The FDA granted Priority Review with a PDUFA, or target action, date of October 2, 2015; the sBLA will be reviewed under the FDA’s Accelerated Approval program.

“ ‘Today’s announcement reflects our commitment to accelerate the development of immunotherapeutic approaches to treat lung cancer, one of the most deadly malignancies,’ said Dr. Roger M. Perlmutter, president, Merck Research Laboratories. ‘We believe that data submitted to the FDA illustrate the significant potential of KEYTRUDA to treat advanced non-small cell lung cancer – and we look forward to working with the FDA to bring our anti-PD-1 therapy to patients afflicted with this devastating cancer.’ “


Relevancy of PD-L1 as a Biomarker for Immunotherapies in NSCLC

“Despite its initial running start, the continuing development of immunotherapies in the field of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) won’t be slowing down anytime soon, according to Naiyer Rizvi, MD.

“ ‘The field is changing so fast,’ said Rizvi, director of Thoracic Oncology and Immunotherapeutics, Columbia University Medical Center, in an exclusive interview with Targeted Oncology. ‘Soon, we will have a better understanding of the first-line use of PD-1 agents, Then, maybe a year later, the data on the combination of PD-1/PD-L1 and CTLA-4 will come out. It is going to be a busy year. The NCCN [National Comprehensive Cancer Network] is going to be busy rewriting their guidelines every 6 months at this rate.’

“One immunotherapy currently being investigated is the anti–PD-1 agent pembrolizumab (Keytruda), in the KEYNOTE-024 study. The study is looking at pembrolizumab in the first-line setting for patients with stage IV metastatic NSCLC whose tumors express PD-L1.”


Putting Immune Checkpoint Blockade to the Test in Breast Cancer


About 10 months ago, we asked: Is There a Future for Immunotherapy in Breast Cancer? Now, we can answer this question with a qualified “yes.” The data show why:

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC)

TNBC has long been considered to be more amenable to immune system-based treatments than other types of breast cancer because it is more immunogenic; that is, relatively high levels of immune cells accumulate within or adjacent to TNBC tumors. These immune cells could be triggered to attack tumors if properly activated. TNBC tumors are also likely to have a higher mutational burden (number of genetic mutations). This is one of the predictors of sensitivity to a type of treatment called immune checkpoint blockade.  Drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors block the proteins PD-1 or PD-L1. In cancer, PD-L1 proteins on tumor cells bind to PD-1 proteins on immune T cells and inhibit their tumor-killing activity. Immune checkpoint drugs disable this interaction and enable activation of T cells. These drugs are actively being explored in TNBC in clinical trials.

Continue reading…


Nivolumab Combined with Radiation Therapy May Be New Treatment Option for Patients with Melanoma Brain Metastases, Say Moffitt Cancer Center Researchers

“President Jimmy Carter’s battle with metastatic melanoma to the brain has placed increased attention on management of this disease. President Carter was treated with focused stereotactic radiation to the brain and anti-PD-1 therapy. Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center recently reported the first series of patients treated with this combined modality approach. They found that radiation therapy combined with the immune-targeting drug nivolumab in melanoma patients with brain metastases is safe and improves their survival compared to historical data.

“Nivolumab is a therapeutic agent that targets a protein on immune cells called PD-1. Binding of PD-1 to its ligand PD-L1, which is found on tumor cells, causes immune cells to decrease their activity and allows cancer cells to escape immune detection and cell death.  Nivolumab blocks the PD-1/PD-L1 interaction and restimulates the body’s own immune system to target tumor cells. Nivolumab has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced non-small cell lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and melanoma; however, the impact of nivolumab on brain metastases is unclear.”


Jason Luke on Significance of Biomarker Development for Immunotherapy in Melanoma

“Although nivolumab (Opdivo) and ipilimumab (Yervoy) together demonstrate superior survival in previously untreated patients with advanced melanoma, the combination comes with additional toxicity and an increased price tag, says Jason Luke, MD, assistant professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago Medicine.

“ ‘There have been several studies designed around trying to predict which patients are most likely to benefit from anti–PD-1 or immunotherapy combinations. I really think that is going to be an essential part of the future approach to treatment, says Luke. ‘Not all patients respond to these treatments. There are additional toxicities with the combinations, and there are also cost issues because of how catastrophically expensive these drugs are. We really need to know which patients are most likely to respond and which aren’t.’ “


The Growing Arsenal of Immunotherapy Drugs for Melanoma


Large numbers of immune cells (T cells in particular) are frequently found within or adjacent to melanoma tumors, indicating that the tumors attract the attention—if not the action—of the immune system. True to its reputation as one of the most ‘immunogenic‘ cancers, melanoma now has more U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved immunotherapy (immune system-targeting) drugs than any other cancer type. As a consequence, metastatic melanoma is no longer the universally fatal disease it was even just 3 or 4 years ago. Continue reading…


FDA Approves Two New Indications for Pembrolizumab in Advanced Melanoma

“The FDA has expanded the approval for single-agent pembrolizumab (Keytruda) to include the frontline treatment of patients with advanced melanoma regardless of BRAF status, based on a substantial improvement in progression-free and overall survival compared with ipilimumab (Yervoy) in the phase III KEYNOTE-006 trial.

“In the study, which compared 2 pembrolizumab regimens with ipilimumab, the PD-1 inhibitor reduced the risk of disease progression by >40% and the risk of death by >30%.

“ ‘As recently as five years ago, there were few treatment options for patients suffering from advanced melanoma,’ Roger M. Perlmutter, MD, PhD, president, Merck Research Laboratories, the developer of the PD-1 inhibitor, said in a statement. ‘Today’s news is another exciting milestone for Keytruda and for patients with this disease.’ “