Flu Vaccine in Lung Cancer Patients Could Increase Immunotherapy Toxicities

Excerpt:

“Seasonal influenza vaccination resulted in increased risk of immune-related adverse events (AEs) in lung cancer patients treated with PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors in a small study. However, the risks of the flu itself may still outweigh the risks associated with vaccination.

” ‘Use of immune checkpoint inhibitors is now standard clinical practice for many oncology patients, and these same patients—particularly those with lung cancer—also face increased risk for complications from influenza,’ said Sacha Rothschild, MD, PhD, of University Hospital Basel in Switzerland, in a press release. ‘Although routine influenza vaccination has long been recommended for cancer patients, there are concerns that it might trigger an exaggerated immune response in this subgroup receiving checkpoint inhibitors.’ ”

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Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Patients Who Responded to Immunotherapy Had Long-Term Survival Benefit

Excerpt:

“Among patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) who were treated with the anti-PD-L1 cancer immunotherapy atezolizumab (Tecentriq), those who responded to the medicine lived significantly longer (overall survival) compared with those who did not respond, according to data from a phase I clinical trial presented here at the AACR Annual Meeting 2017, April 1-5.

” ‘Triple-negative is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer often affecting younger women and, unfortunately, the current options for metastatic disease remain limited,’ said Peter Schmid, MD, PhD, director of the St. Bartholomew’s Breast Centre at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital and Barts Cancer Institute in London.”

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Metastatic Melanoma: Not Quite Curable…But Getting There


By 2050, the number of deaths due to malignant melanoma in the U.S. could be three times lower than peak levels reached before 1960. Researchers presented the data behind this prediction at the 2017 European Cancer Congress in January.

It is unclear how much of this anticipated decline in deaths can be attributed to the availability of new, effective treatments. However, it is obvious that much-increased awareness of sunlight exposure as the single factor most responsible for the development of skin melanoma has contributed to lower incidence of the disease.

In any case, the armament of treatments available for metastatic melanoma is currently such that this diagnosis has transformed from being almost universally fatal (even just a few years ago) into a being largely treatable. Since 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved eight new drugs for melanoma.

Now, the pressing questions are: Why do these drugs not work for all patients? How can doctors select which patients should be treated with different types of drugs (targeted versus immune checkpoint versus intralesional)? And how can doctors identify patients who may benefit from a combination of different drugs?

BRAF-mutant melanoma: targeted drugs 

Getting a positive test for the BRAF V600 tumor mutation is certainly good news for a newly diagnosed melanoma patient. This is because some targeted drugs work very well against such tumors, which account for about 50% of melanomas.

The drugs vemurafenib or dabrafenib, which attack tumors by inhibiting mutant BRAF proteins, are no longer used on their own because combining them with MEK inhibitors (cobimetinib and trametinib, respectively) works so much better. The percentage of patients who respond to combined BRAF/MEK inhibition is about 70% or higher, and durable complete responses were observed in about 19% patients with stage IV or unresectable stage III melanoma in three large clinical trials that tested these combinations. The results of treatment with dabrafenib and trametinib in patients with resectable stage III melanoma were particularly impressive. One hundred percent of these patients had no relapse within the first six months after treatment, compared to just 28% of those treated with standard chemotherapy. All patients had fewer than three metastatic sites.

That last point brings us to an important question: Which stage IV patients with BRAF-mutant (BRAF+) melanoma may need a combined treatment with targeted and immunotherapy (immune checkpoint) drugs?

It is becoming clear that stage IV patients who have fewer, less bulky metastases (lower tumor burden) do much better on BRAF/MEK-targeting drugs. High blood levels of a protein called LDH has long been recognized as a poor prognostic factor in melanoma, and it has not lost its grim significance in the era of targeted and immunotherapy drugs. Patients with high LDH and many metastatic tumors may need a combined treatment with BRAF/MEK inhibitors and immune checkpoint drugs.

So far, combination treatments have proven to be efficacious in patients with high tumor burden. The problem is that combining BRAF/MEK inhibitors with immune checkpoint drugs of the type known as anti-PD-1 increases side effects (toxicity) in quite a dramatic way. The Keynote 022 clinical trial—which combined the anti-PD-1 drug pembrolizumab with dabrafenib and trametinib in a small group of patients—reported that 40% experienced serious side effects (grade 3–4), and close to 30% discontinued treatment. A response rate of 60% was observed but remains to be confirmed.

A very similar rate of side effects was observed in a trial that combined atezolizumab (another immune checkpoint drug of the type known as anti-PD-L1) with vemurafenib and cobimetinib. On a highly positive note, 83% of the patients in this trial responded to the treatment, with 10% going into complete remission. An earlier study of durvalumab (also anti-PD-L1) with dabrafenib and trametinib saw responses in 69% of patients.

Several trials have also addressed the possibility of sequential treatment with two different types of drugs in order to address the problem of toxicity.

Immune checkpoint drugs across the molecular subtypes

Immune checkpoint drugs may also be effective in tumors with mutations other than BRAF, including a mutation in the NRAS gene (NRAS+). Data are being accumulated for patients receiving the FDA-approved immunotherapy drugs nivolumab or pembrolizumab (both anti-PD-1 drugs). It appears that 47% of patients receiving nivolumab survive for three years, and 48–49% of those receiving pembrolizumab survive for 2 years (pembrolizumab data have not yet reached the 3-year point). Combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab (a type of immune checkpoint drug known as an anti-CTLA4 antibody) could eventually produce better results, but at the cost of a much higher toxicity. It is a bit difficult to say if these data are similar for BRAF+ and BRAF-/NRAS+ melanoma patients receiving immune checkpoint drugs, because most patients with BRAF+ cancers receive targeted drugs.

NRAS-mutant melanoma

Patients whose tumors test positive for an NRAS mutation (NRAS+) but not for a BRAF mutation (BRAF-) certainly have fewer treatment options than those whose tumors are BRAF-positive. NRAS mutations are encountered in about 20% of melanomas, and there are no effective targeted drugs for this subgroup. The only targeted drug that has shown promise in NRAS+ melanoma is binimetinib, a MEK inhibitor. In a trial for patients who were either untreated or had not responded to immune checkpoint drugs, binimetinib produced responses in 45% of patients; of those receiving only dacarbazine, a standard chemotherapy, just 9% responded. However, binimetinib prolonged overall survival by just 1.3 months compared to dacarbazine—not exactly an impressive improvement, which is apparently why the manufacturer of binimetinib withdrew its application for FDA approval of the drug.

Other trials are testing immune checkpoint drugs combined with MEK inhibitors for patients whose melanomas have no BRAF mutations (of which a substantial proportion have mutated NRAS). No results of these trials have yet been reported. Meanwhile, a very small study reported a response rate of 45% to combination of atezolizumab (anti-PD-L1) and cobimetinib in BRAF- melanoma patients. Additional trials testing durvalumab or pembrolizumab with trametinib have not posted results yet.

Regardless of specific tumor mutations, much hope lies in the clinical exploration of combinations of drugs that activate the immune system in different ways. Numerous immune checkpoint drugs work by activating the immune system. However, unlike the anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 drugs discussed above, which remove inhibitory signals from the immune system’s T cells so they can attack cancer cells, newer drugs actually activate T cells by binding to positive regulatory proteins on these cells. Other new drugs aim to eliminate inhibitory signals created in the tumor microenvironment, such as those produced by different types of inflammatory cells or regulatory T cells. I would refer the interested reader to this excellent overview of these new drugs, which are now being tested against metastatic melanoma in numerous phase I trials.


Nab-Paclitaxel Paired With Anti-PD-L1 Immunotherapies in TNBC Studies

Excerpt:

“Combination regimens that pair nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane) with PD-L1 checkpoint blockade immunotherapy agents are emerging as a robust area of investigation in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), bolstered by clinical trial results that establish the chemotherapeutic agent as an effective partner for other therapies.

“Although nab-paclitaxel has been combined in some studies with other chemotherapies, the focus is shifting to regimens that include immunotherapies as the efficacy of that approach continues to grow. Nab-paclitaxel, an albumin-bound form of paclitaxel, is indicated for patients with metastatic breast cancer after prior chemotherapy.”

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Super Patient: Peter Fortenbaugh Faces the Uncertainty of Pioneering Melanoma Treatment


In spring of 2014, Peter Fortenbaugh noticed what appeared to be a tick that had bitten his lower calf. “It turned out not to be a tick, but it didn’t really go away,” he says.

The spot began to grow and bulge, and in October, Peter showed it to his primary care doctor, who referred him to a dermatologist to remove it. At the time, Peter recalls, it did not occur to him that the growth could be serious.

“I was actually very concerned about skin cancer because I spent a lot of time out in the sun sailing,” Peter says. “I put on a tremendous amount of sunscreen and protection, but never on my legs…I never connected the dots.”

However, a biopsy of the growth came back positive for melanoma. Peter, who lives in Palo Alto, California, with his wife and three children, immediately reached out to several doctors in the San Francisco Bay Area, and all had the same advice: “Take it out, take a biopsy.” Continue reading…


Immunotherapy Drug Gives Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Extra Four Months of Life

Excerpt:

“Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer survive four months longer with fewer side effects on an immunotherapy drug called atezolizumab compared to chemotherapy, according to a phase 3 clinical trial published in The Lancet.

“The trial enrolled 1225 advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients who have no more treatment options, but this study used an early analysis of the first 850 patients from the trial. Half of the group were given atezolizumab and the other half were given docetaxel chemotherapy, which is the standard treatment for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

“Patients given atezolizumab – a drug that blocks the programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) protein – survived for an average of 13.8 months, compared with 9.6 months for those on chemotherapy.”

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Early Results Positive for First-Line Avelumab in NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Treatment with first-line avelumab yielded promising clinical benefit and durable antitumor activity in patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a presentation at the IASLC 17th World Conference on Lung Cancer.

“After a median follow-up of 13 weeks, the objective response rate with the anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy agent was 22.4% (95% CI, 16.2-29.8) and the median progression-free survival (PFS) was 17.6 weeks (95% CI, 11.6-23.6) among 156 patients who participated in one of the NSCLC cohorts of the wide-ranging JAVELIN Solid Tumor trial, Claire Verschraegen, MD, director, The University of Vermont Cancer Center, said in describing early analysis data at the conference in Vienna.”

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G1 Therapeutics to Evaluate Trilaciclib (G1T28) in Combination with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor in Small-Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“G1 Therapeutics, Inc., a clinical-stage oncology company, announced today a clinical trial collaboration with Genentech, a member of the Roche Group. A Phase 2 clinical trial is expected to begin in the first half of 2017 and will evaluate the combination of Genentech’s immune checkpoint, anti-PD-L1 antibody Tecentriq® (atezolizumab) with G1’s CDK4/6 inhibitor trilaciclib (G1T28) as a first-line treatment for patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) receiving chemotherapy.”

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Study Characterizes Pneumonitis Risk With Immunotherapeutic Agents

Excerpt:

“Pneumonitis occurs in approximately 5% of cancer patients treated with anti–programmed death 1 (PD-1)/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) immunotherapy agents, according to a new analysis. The complication tends to be low grade and easily resolved, though it can worsen and result in death in rare cases.

“ ‘One of the remarkable characteristics of anti–PD-1/PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies is their relatively mild toxicity profile,’ wrote study authors led by Matthew D. Hellmann, MD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. ‘However, immune-related adverse events can occur and may be severe.’ Pneumonitis is one such immune-related adverse event, and it accounted for several deaths in early trials of these agents.”

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