Study Findings Provide Latest Data on Neoadjuvant HER2+ Breast Cancer Treatment

Excerpt:

“Results from the KRISTINE and NSABP B-41 trials provided the latest data on the use of pertuzumab (Perjeta), trastuzumab (Herceptin), ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1; Kadcyla), and lapatinib (Tykerb) for the neoadjuvant treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

“In a lecture at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting, Stephen K. Chia, MD, an assistant professor in the division of Medical Oncology at the University of British Columbia, highlighted the key findings from these trials and their implications for the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer.”

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Hypofractionation May Be Poised to Become New Standard of Care for Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“There has been an ongoing debate about which type of radiation therapy is preferable in the treatment of localized prostate cancer: hypofractionation (larger fractions given over 4–5 weeks) or conventional radiotherapy (given over 8–9 weeks). A new study presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting may help to resolve that debate.

“The large, randomized trial found that hypofractionation was not inferior to conventional radiation therapy in terms of efficacy or safety in men with localized intermediate-risk prostate cancer. This is the third large, randomized, contemporary study to demonstrate that both techniques have equivalent efficacy and safety.”

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Use of Anthracyclines Plus Taxanes Found to be Beneficial in Early, HER2-Negative Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Treatment with anthracyclines was proven to be beneficial for patients with high-risk, HER2-negative, early-stage breast cancer, according to a joint analysis of the “ABC” trials presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting.

“The analysis, which included more than 4000 patients, demonstrated that docetaxel plus cyclophosphamide (TC) was significantly inferior to various taxane-plus-anthracycline-based (TaxAC) chemotherapy regimens.

“ ‘Statistical noninferiority of the non-anthracycline regimen could not be demonstrated,’ said lead investigator Joanne Lorraine Blum, MD, PhD, medical oncologist with Texas Oncology at the Baylor-Sammons Cancer Center in Dallas. ‘In terms of the study’s primary endpoint, invasive disease-free survival, TC x 6 was significantly inferior to TaxAC.’ ”

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Results of Two Practice-Changing Breast Cancer Trials Upheld

Excerpt:

“Results of two pivotal breast cancer trials reported at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting confirmed the practice-changing findings that resulted from earlier findings.

“The phase III PALOMA-2 trial confirmed results from the smaller, open-label phase II PALOMA-1 trial that led to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib (Ibrance). The drug was approved in combination with letrozole for the first-line treatment of metastatic disease.

“ ‘These data represent the longest front-line improvement in median progression-free survival seen to date in women with advanced estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer,’ said Dennis Slamon, MD, Director of Clinical/Translational Research and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, and Director of the Revlon/UCLA Women’s Cancer Research Program.”

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Novel Combination Study Planned for SCLC

Excerpt:

“A phase I/II study will explore the delta-like protein 3 (DLL3)-targeted antibody-drug conjugate rovalpituzumab tesirine (Rova-T) with the PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab (Opdivo) alone or in combination with the CTLA-4 inhibitor ipilimumab (Yervoy) for patients with relapsed extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC).

“AbbVie, the developer of rovalpituzumab tesirine, and Bristol-Myers Squibb, the company marketing nivolumab and ipilimumab announced the phase I/II study in a joint press release. As single-agents, rovalpituzumab tesirine and nivolumab have each demonstrated promising early findings for patients with SCLC. Additionally, nivolumab plus ipilimumab sparked promising response rates and overall survival (OS) findings. Data for the 3 agents were recently presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting.”

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New Research on Triple Negative Breast Cancer Emerges at ASCO 2016


The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting of 2016 is behind us, but oncologists, patients, and journalists are still analyzing the most interesting presentations made there. Below, we describe some of the more prominent results in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), both promising and disappointing.

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CDK4/6 Inhibitor Shows Promise as Single Agent in HR+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“As a single agent, abemaciclib has shown exciting potential in heavily pretreated patients with refractory, hormone-receptor (HR)–positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer, following phase II findings of the MONARCH 1 trial.

“Results of the single-arm study, which were presented during the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting1, show that the CDK4/6 inhibitor induced a response rate of nearly 20% in this patient population. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6 months (95% CI 4.2-7.5) and the median overall survival (OS) was 17.7 months (95% CI, 16 to not reached). Previously, abemaciclib received a breakthrough therapy designation in this setting from the FDA in October 2015.”

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Lead NEMO Author Shares Excitement With Binimetinib in NRAS-Mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“For patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma who progress following treatment with an immunotherapy agent, the MEK inhibitor binimetinib offers a promising option, explains Reinhard Georg Dummer, MD.

“Results of the open-label phase III NEMO trial, which were presented during the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting,1 most recently demonstrated the agent’s potential. In the study, binimetinib was found to reduce the risk of progression or death by 38% when compared with dacarbazine in this subgroup of patients.

“Additionally, median progression-free survival (PFS) with binimetinib was 2.8 months versus 1.5 months with dacarbazine (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.47-0.80; P <.0001). The objective response rate with binimetinib was 15%, including 1 complete response, compared with 7% for dacarbazine.”

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HYPRO: Shorter RT Course No Better, Worse in Localized Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“A randomized phase III trial found that a hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) regimen was not superior to, but generally equivalent to a conventional RT scheme in men with localized prostate cancer. The study joins a growing body of literature on hypofractionation in this malignancy, generally showing that the shorter courses are a reasonable option.

“A low α-β ratio for prostate cancer has generated interest in hypofractionation, as it could increase the tumor dose without increasing toxicities. ‘Moreover, hypofractionated radiotherapy is delivered in fewer fractions, improving patients’ convenience, hospital logistics, and possibly reducing healthcare costs,’ wrote study authors led by Luca Incrocci, MD, PhD, of Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute in Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

“A study was presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago that found a hypofractionated regimen of 60 Gy in 20 fractions was noninferior to conventional RT. Another, presented this past January at the ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, again found a 60 Gy/20 fractions regimen was noninferior to conventional RT and to another hypofractionated regimen of 57 Gy/19 fractions.”

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