3-Year Follow-Up Data for Dabrafenib/Trametinib Confirm Results of Combo in Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Three-year follow-up data from the phase III COMBI-d study was presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting, revealing impressive overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) data for the dabrafenib (Tafinlar) and trametinib (Mekinist) combination therapy for patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma.

“At the February 15, 2016 data cutoff for the 3-year analysis, 58% of patients remained on therapy. The 3-year PFS rate with the combination was 22% versus 12% with single-agent dabrafenib. The 3-year OS rate was 44% with dabrafenib plus trametinib compared with 32% with dabrafenib alone.

” ‘This is the longest OS follow-up among randomized phase III trials evaluating a BRAF plus MEK inhibitor in patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma,’ said lead investigator Keith T. Flaherty, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. ‘With additional follow-up, and now 3-year maturity, dabrafenib plus trametinib continued to show significant benefit over dabrafenib monotherapy, despite crossover.’ ”

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Combining BRAF Inhibition, Anti-PD-1 No Help in BRAF-Mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma obtained no survival benefit from combined treatment of anti-BRAF therapy and an immune checkpoint inhibitor, a retrospective analysis showed.

“Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.0 to 6.5 months in BRAF-inhibitor naive patients who received a PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitor alone or with a BRAF inhibitor. Patients with prior exposure to a BRAF inhibitor had a median PFS of 8.0 months with anti–PD-1 therapy and 4.5 months with combined treatment. Median overall survival was 10.5 to 12 months with a PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitor alone or in combination with a BRAF inhibitor, regardless of prior BRAF inhibitor exposure status.

“ ‘BRAF inhibitor-refractory patients derived no additional benefit with anti-PD therapy in combination with BRAF inhibition,’ Wen-Jen Hwu, MD, of MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and colleagues concluded in a poster presentation at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago. ‘Clinical findings are similar with either anti-PD alone or in combination with BRAF inhibition in terms of objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and overall survival (OS).’ ”

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Black Women Less Likely to Pursue BRCA Testing and Cancer Risk Reduction Measures

Excerpt:

“Findings from a population-based study reported at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting revealed that young black women with breast cancer are much less likely to undergo testing for the BRCA gene than other women. Or, if they do carry a BRCA mutation, they are less likely to get a prophylactic mastectomy or salpingo-oophorectomy to reduce the risk of developing cancer.

“The research identified disparities in recipients of BRCA testing between non-Hispanic white women, Hispanic, and black women, with the latter being the least likely to undergo testing. Likewise, black women who were BRCA carriers were less likely to undergo risk-management practices compared with their white and Hispanic counterparts.

“ ‘We need to understand the reasons for these findings,’ said lead study author Tuya Pal, MD, a clinical geneticist at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida. Ultimately, it’s the patient who must decide whether to have genetic testing and take prophylactic measures for risk management, Pal said.”

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AbbVie Shares Fall on Low Survival Data for Lung Cancer Drug

Excerpt:

“AbbVie Inc.’s shares fell Monday after an early trial showed patients taking the company’s experimental lung cancer drug survived fewer months than typical of those on chemotherapy, raising questions as to whether the company was right to buy the medicine in a $5.8 billion deal.

“AbbVie’s drug is known as Rova-T. In patients with an aggressive form of lung cancer who expressed more of the protein marker known as DLL3 that’s targeted by the drug, median survival was 5.8 months, according to data presented Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology in Chicago. With the only approved drug for recurrent disease, a form of chemotherapy called topotecan, median overall survival is about seven months, according to Tony Butler, an analyst at Guggenheim Partners.

“Rova-T’s initial survival data could be a disappointment to investors, Barclays analyst Geoff Meacham said in a note to clients. AbbVie’s shares dropped 4 percent to $62.42 at 10:32 a.m. in New York.”

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Tagrisso (Osimertinib) Shows Clinical Activity in Patients with Leptomeningeal Disease from Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“AstraZeneca today announced clinical and safety data for osimertinib in patients with leptomeningeal (LM) disease, a complication of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC),1 where cancer cells spread to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). LM is a devastating disease often associated with advanced lung cancer.

“The updated BLOOM Phase I trial results, presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting, showed that irrespective of T790M mutation status of patients, osimertinib demonstrated activity through assessments with MRI imaging intracranial response.”

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Pfizer Presents Promising Data from Next Generation ALK/ROS1 Inhibitor in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Pfizer Inc. (NYSE:PFE) today announced encouraging new data from a Phase 1/2 study of lorlatinib, the proposed generic name for PF-06463922, Pfizer’s investigational, next-generation ALK/ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The study showed clinical response in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including patients with brain metastases. These data were presented today in an oral presentation at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago.

“The results presented are from the dose escalation component of an ongoing Phase 1 study of patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive NSCLC, with or without brain metastases, who were treatment-naïve or had disease progression after at least one prior tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Among patients with ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC, the overall response rate (ORR) with lorlatinib was 46 percent, with three patients achieving complete responses and 16 patients achieving a partial response (95% CI: 31-63). The median progression free survival (PFS) was 11.4 months (95% CI: 3.4 – 16.6). The majority of patients had received two or more prior ALK TKIs. Additionally, lorlatinib showed the ability to decrease the size of brain metastases in patients with ALK-positive or ROS1-positive metastatic NSCLC.”

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Pfizer Presents Data from Phase 1b Trial Investigating Utomilumab (a 4-1BB agonist) in Combination with a Checkpoint Inhibitor

Excerpt:

“Pfizer Inc. PFE -0.26% today announced results from a Phase 1b trial of Pfizer’s investigational immunotherapy agent utomilumab (the proposed non-proprietary name for PF-05082566), a 4-1BB (also called CD137) agonist, in combination with pembrolizumab, a PD-1 inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors. This is the first reported study of a 4-1BB agonist combined with a checkpoint inhibitor. Encouraging safety data from the study were shared today as an oral presentation at the 52 [nd] Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago.

“ ‘While these are early data, the combination of utomilumab with pembrolizumab demonstrates an encouraging safety profile and an early indication of potential anti-tumor activity across solid tumors,’ said Anthony W. Tolcher, M.D., director of clinical research at South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics (START) San Antonio. ‘We believe these results warrant further investigation to confirm whether combining utomilumab with a checkpoint inhibitor may amplify anti-tumor responses.’ ”

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Despite ASCO Mishap, Data Still Intriguing for Sacituzumab Govitecan in TNBC

Excerpt:

“Sacituzumab govitecan (IMMU-132) had an objective response rate (ORR) of 33% in pretreated patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), according to updated findings from a phase II study reported by Immunomedics, the manufacturer of the antibody-drug conjugate.

“The results were originally scheduled to be presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting; however, the study was excluded from the conference when ASCO became aware that its meeting embargo had been violated when the chairman of Immunomedics reported the results at a conference in April. The ASCO exclusion did not question the quality of the research findings, according to a statement from Immunomedics.”

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Lilly Announces Results from MONARCH 1 Trial of Abemaciclib Monotherapy

Excerpt:

“Eli Lilly and Company (LLY) today announced results from the MONARCH 1 Phase 2 study of abemaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and CDK 6 inhibitor, in patients with hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) metastatic breast cancer. The data, which were presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting by Maura Dickler, M.D., of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, showed that single-agent activity was observed in metastatic breast cancer patients, for whom endocrine therapy was no longer a suitable treatment option. The MONARCH 1 results (abstract #510) confirmed objective response (ORR), durability of response (DoR), clinical benefit rate (CBR) and progression-free survival (PFS).

“The single-arm study, designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of abemaciclib monotherapy, enrolled 132 patients who were given 200 mg of abemaciclib orally every 12 hours until disease progression. Patients enrolled in the study were heavily pretreated, having experienced progressive disease on or after prior endocrine therapy, and had received prior chemotherapy with one or two chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease. The primary objective of the trial was investigator-assessed ORR, with secondary endpoints of DoR, CBR and PFS.”

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