Cancer Drug Starts Clinical Trials in Human Brain-Cancer Patients

Excerpt:

“A drug that spurs cancer cells to self-destruct has been cleared for use in a clinical trial of patients with anaplastic astrocytoma, a rare malignant brain tumor, and glioblastoma multiforme, an aggressive late-stage cancer of the brain. This phase Ib trial will determine if the experimental drug PAC-1 can be used safely in combination with a standard brain-cancer chemotherapy drug, temozolomide.

“The trial is approved for patients who have seen their cancer progress after first-line therapy. This is an extension of an ongoing human phase I clinical trial of PAC-1 alone in patients with various late-stage cancers. Phase I  are designed to test the safety of new drugs in human patients.”

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Super Advocate: Stephen Western Helps Brain Cancer Patients Keep Up with the Latest Research


Stephen Western is a dedicated advocate for people dealing with brain cancer. He started this work in February 2013, when his friend was diagnosed with a type of brain tumor known as an astrocytoma. In order to help her, he began to learn all he could about the science of astrocytoma treatment.

Stephen soon realized that many more patients might benefit from his growing knowledge, so he created the website Astrocytoma Options to share this information and update it as new research emerges. He also helps run another site that focuses on the multi-drug “cocktails” often used in brain tumor treatment.

Although Stephen has no formal scientific training, he is able to help patients better understand their treatment options and stay up-to-date on the latest treatment research. To learn more about his work, I interviewed him via email: Continue reading…


Planned Clinical Phase I Trial to Examine the Safety of Vaccine Against Gliomas Based on Mutant IDH1 in Human Patients

“Astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas are subtypes of a brain cancer called ‘glioma’. These incurable brain tumors arise from glial cells, a type of support cell found in the central nervous system. ‘Low-grade gliomas’, which grow comparatively slowly, spread in a diffuse manner across the brain and are very difficult to completely eliminate through surgery. In many cases, the effectiveness of treatments with chemotherapy and radiotherapy is very limited. Gliomas can develop into extremely aggressive glioblastomas.

“Low-grade gliomas have a particular feature in common: more than 70% of the cases exhibit the same gene mutation in tumor cells. An identical ‘typo’ in the DNA causes the exchange of a single, specific protein building block (amino acid) in an enzyme called isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1). As a result, most cancer cells do not follow the original building plan for the protein; at the 132nd position in the molecule’s sequence, they insert the amino acid histidine instead of arginine…

” ‘…we might be able to use a vaccine to alert the patient’s immune system to mutant IDH1, fighting the tumor without damaging healthy cells,’ [Prof. Dr. Michael Platten at the German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research] explains.

“In collaboration with a team of physicians and scientists from Heidelberg University Hospital, DKFZ and the Universities of Mainz, Tübingen and Hamburg, Platten and his co-workers have now made the first successful step toward a vaccine that specifically targets the mutation in the tumor.

“In a clinical trial scheduled to start early next year, with the support of the German Consortium for Translational Cancer Research (DKTK), they plan to examine the safety of the vaccine against gliomas based on mutant IDH1 in human patients, for the first time.”

Editor’s note: Early next year, oncologists will begin testing a newly developed cancer vaccine in a clinical trial with volunteer patients, in the hopes that it will help treat low-grade gliomas. Cancer vaccines are a type of immunotherapy treatment; they boost a patient’s own immune system to fight cancer. The new vaccine takes advantage of a dysfunctional protein that is found in 70% of low-grade gliomas. The protein is called IDH1, and the vaccine is designed to alert the patient’s immune system to attack cells with mutant IDH1, potentially shrinking the brain tumor. So far, the vaccine has only been tested in mice, but the results were promising.