New Research Takes Aim at Deadliest Form of Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Forget the pink ribbons. Spitting in a tube for science is what unites a growing group of breast cancer patients taking part in a unique project to advance treatment for the deadliest form of the disease.

“For many of the 150,000-plus patients nationwide whose tumors have spread to bones, brains, lungs or other distant organs, the hue heralding breast cancer awareness and survival each October is a little too rosy. They know cancer will likely kill them. And they’ve often felt neglected by mainstream advocacy and medical research.”

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If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Lifeline service.


Public Awareness of Surgical Options for Breast Cancer Improves

“The public’s awareness of reconstructive breast surgery options were boosted following media coverage of Angelina Jolie’s hereditary disposition to breast cancer and preventive double mastectomy in 2013. The results of a prospective, public survey were published earlier this week in Cancer.

“Significantly more women were aware of reconstructive breast surgery options after mastectomies for breast cancer. About 20% of the 205 women polled communicated that their awareness and interest in breast cancer stemmed from the media coverage of Angelina Jolie. The survey results suggest that media coverage can improve the health IQ of the public.

“ ‘The results underscore the importance of a media-related impact for professionals in the health care sector, which can serve as a tipping point for raising awareness and improving knowledge concerning a specific disease among the general public,’ wrote David Benjamin Lumenta, MD, of the department of surgery at the Medical University of Graz in Austria, and colleagues.”


Colon Cancer Decreases but Misconceptions Remain

“Recent reports have shown that colon cancer rates have fallen by 30 percent over the past decade, particularly in people over age 50, because of the effectiveness of colonoscopies and awareness efforts surrounding the condition.

“Martha Ferguson, MD, UC Cancer Institute physician, associate professor at the UC College of Medicine and UC Health Colon and Rectal surgeon, says that these numbers are promising but that there are still misconceptions that are causing people to forgo their colonoscopy.

” ‘Colonoscopies are recommended every 10 years for average-risk people beginning at age 50—earlier if there is a family history of colon cancer,’ Ferguson says. ‘However, some people think that a colonoscopy is going to be a miserable, painful test, and that isn’t the case.’ “


Association Launches Nationwide Lung Cancer Awareness Initiative

“The American Lung Association – in partnership with national presenting sponsor, CVS Caremark – recently unveiled LUNG FORCE, a national initiative to make lung cancer in women a public health priority, drive policy change and expand research funding.

“ ‘Together we have to make lung cancer in women a public health priority and change our thinking about this disease. We hope that with increased awareness and education, women will join the fight against lung cancer and for lung health,’ Harold Wimmer, national president and chief executive officer of the American Lung Association, said in a press release. ‘We are proud to introduce LUNG FORCE and honored to have CVS Caremark as a partner in this new movement that unites women to stand together against lung cancer.’ ”


10 Issues to Consider During National Skin Cancer Awareness Month

“Accounting for approximately half of all cancers in the United States, skin cancer is widely recognized as the most common cause of cancer nationwide. More than 3.5 million cases of skin cancer are diagnosed each year, and according to the Skin Cancer Foundation, incidences of skin cancer outnumber all combined cases of breast, colon, lung and prostate cancers.

“With the month of May designated as National Skin Cancer Awareness Month, HemOnc Today highlights 10 issues for oncologists and dermatologists to consider for their patients, as well as the new guideline revisions and research regarding the identification, treatment and management of patients with melanoma and skin cancer.”


Movember… A Typo?… No, It’s 4 million mustaches and $91,926,571

“In 2003, a couple of mates sat in a pub bemoaning the loss of the mustache…apparently few men in Australia were sporting a crop of hair on their upper lip.  They came up with the idea of spending a month, November, trying to grow a mustache or in Australian parlance a “mo.”  They recruited other mates and decided to raise money for men’s health…Four million mustaches and $91,926,571 have been “raised” this past November.”