Erlotinib Alone or with Bevacizumab as First-Line Therapy in Patients with Advanced Non-Squamous Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Harbouring EGFR Mutations (JO25567): An Open-Label, Randomised, Multicentre, Phase 2 Study

Editor’s note: This article describes the results of a clinical trial—a research study with volunteer patients. The goal of the trial was to compare two different treatment approaches for non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mutations in the EGFR gene. One treatment combined the drugs erlotinib and bevacizumab, and the other treatment was simply erlotinib alone. Based on the results, the researchers say that erlotinib plus bevacizumab could be a new standard treatment for people with NSCLC with EGFR mutations.

“The authors aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of the combination of erlotinib and bevacizumab compared with erlotinib alone in patients with non–squamous NSCLC with activating EGFR mutation–positive disease. Erlotinib plus bevacizumab combination could be a new first–line regimen in EGFR mutation–positive NSCLC. Further investigation of the regimen is warranted.”


Breast Cancer Specialist Reports Advance in Treatment of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

“Because of its rapid growth rate, many women with triple-negative breast cancer receive chemotherapy to try to shrink it before undergoing surgery. With the standard treatment, the cancer is eliminated from the breast and lymph nodes in the armpit before surgery in about one third of women. This is referred to as a pathologic complete response (pCR). In patients who achieve pCR, the cancer is much less likely to come back, spread to other parts of the body, and cause the patient’s death than if the cancer survives the chemotherapy.

“Sikov and his collaborators studied the addition of other drugs – carboplatin and/or bevacizumab – to the standard treatment regimen to see if they could increase response rates. More than 440 women from cancer centers across the country enrolled in this randomized clinical trial.

” ‘Adding either of these medications significantly increased the percentage of women who achieved a pCR with the preoperative treatment. We hope that this means fewer women will relapse and die of their cancer, though the study is not large enough to prove this conclusively. Of the two agents we studied, we are more encouraged by the results from the addition of carboplatin, since it was associated with fewer and less concerning additional side effects than bevacizumab,’ Sikov explains.”

Editor’s note: This article describes the results of a clinical trial—a research study with volunteer patients.


Erbitux Edges Avastin for First-Line Colorectal Cancer Therapy

Editor’s note: This article discusses the results of a clinical trial—a research study with volunteer patients. The goal of the trial was to compare two drugs—bevacizumab and cetuximab—when they were added to the standard chemotherapy combo FOLFIRI. All patients who participated in the trial had metastatic colorectal cancer. The researchers found that patients treated with FOLFIRI plus cetuximab had longer overall survival times that patients treated with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab. The results differ from those from another recent study, which found no significant difference between the two treatments.

“Adding cetuximab (Erbitux) to the standard first-line FOLFIRI chemotherapy regimen resulted in longer overall survival compared with FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab (Avastin) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, according to results of the phase III FIRE-3 trial published this month in the Lancet.

“This result was seen in patients with a wild-type exon 2 KRAS gene. The longer overall survival was observed despite there being no significant difference in objective response between the two study groups.

“The study analyzed data from 592 patients with KRAS exon 2 wild-type colorectal cancer treated with FOLFORI and either cetuximab (an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor) or bevacizumab (an angiogenesis inhibitor). Patients were recruited at 116 Austrian and German cancer centers.”


New Blood Test Could Offer More Tailored Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

“A new blood test allowing doctors to predict which ovarian cancer patients will respond to particular types of treatment is a step closer following a new study by Manchester scientists.

“Researchers from The University of Manchester and The Christie NHS Foundation Trust – both part of Manchester Cancer Research Centre – say the test could be developed and used in hospitals within the next few years.

“It would mean medics could see which patients could benefit from blood vessel-targeting drugs – such as bevacizumab – in addition to conventional therapy. Meanwhilehile others who are not going to benefit would be spared the time and side effects associated with having the drug. The test would also help to reduce the cost to the NHS.”

 


Pemetrexed Plus Cisplatin Active in Advanced, Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma

Editor’s note: This article describes the results of a clinical trial—a research study with volunteer patients. The goal of the trial was to test a new treatment for women with advanced, recurrent cervical cancer. The treatment combines the drugs pemetrexed and cisplatin. The results were promising: the new treatment appeared to be safe and effective. More research needs to be done to determine just how effective it is. Also, scientists are interested in testing whether it is even more effective when combined with the targeted drug bevacizumab (Avastin).

“The combination of pemetrexed and cisplatin appeared safe and effective in women with advanced, persistent or recurrent carcinoma of the cervix, according to results of a phase 2 trial.

“ ‘This combination should be further developed in the treatment of cervical cancer,’ David Scott Miller, MD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at UT Southwestern Medical Center, and colleagues wrote. ‘Given that it may be less toxic than and as active as cisplatin plus paclitaxel, and that it can be combined with bevacizumab (Avastin, Genentech), comparison of cisplatin–pemetrexed plus bevacizumab with cisplatin–paclitaxel plus bevacizumab would be appropriate.’ ”


Higher Bar Set for Trials in Advanced Colorectal Cancer

Editor’s note: This article describes the results of a clinical trial—a research study with volunteer patients. The goal of the trial was to compare four different treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). All patients took a combination of chemotherapy drugs; either FOLFIRI [which combines folinic acid, fluorouracil and irinotecan] or FOLFOX [folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin]. Patients also took a targeted drug alongside the chemo; either bevacizumab (aka Avastin) or cetuximab (Erbitux). All four treatment combinations resulted in similar survival times—a median of 29 months. Compared to other clinical trials, this is a relatively long survival time. Based on these results, oncologists will now have more options for treating their patients according to patients’ preferences and side effects.

“Patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) receiving first-line treatment with a chemotherapy backbone plus bevacizumab or cetuximab survived for a median of 29 months, the longest median survival time reported in a major trial of these severely ill patients.

“Importantly, survival times were the same, whether patients received the anti–vascular endothelial growth factor bevacizumab (Avastin, Genentech) or the anti–epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cetuximab (Erbitux, Bristol-Myers Squibb), or whether they received FOLFOX or FOLFIRI, results from the long-awaited Phase III CALGB/SWOG 80405 trial showed.

“ ‘What this tells us is that either FOLFIRI [folinic acid, fluorouracil and irinotecan] or FOLFOX [folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin] with either bevacizumab or cetuximab are perfectly reasonable options,’ said Alan P. Venook, MD, the Madden Family Distinguished Professor of Medical Oncology and Translational Research at the University of California, San Francisco.”


FDA Approves Avastin to Treat Patients with Aggressive and Late-Stage Cervical Cancer

“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved a new use for Avastin (bevacizumab) to treat patients with persistent, recurrent or late-stage (metastatic) cervical cancer.

“Cervical cancer grows in the tissues of the lower part of the uterus known as the cervix. It commonly occurs when human papillomaviruses (HPV), a virus that spreads through sexual contact, cause cells to become cancerous. Although there are two licensed vaccines available to prevent many types of HPV that can cause cervical cancer, the National Cancer Institute estimates that 12,360 American women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer and 4,020 will die from the disease in 2014.

“Avastin works by interfering with the blood vessels that fuel the development of cancerous cells. The new indication for cervical cancer is approved for use in combination with chemotherapy drugs paclitaxel and cisplatin or in combination with paclitaxel and topotecan.”


No Difference in Response Rate but Overall Survival Benefit With First-Line FOLFIRI/Cetuximab vs FOLFIRI/Bevacizumab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Editor’s note: Researchers organized a clinical trial with volunteer patients to compare two treatments for people with metastatic colorectal cancer. All patients in the trial took a chemotherapy treatment called FOLFIRI. (FOLFIRI combines the drugs fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan.) Some of the patients were also given the drug cetuximab, and the rest took the drug bevacizumab along with FOLFIRI. The patients who took FOLFIRI plus cetuximab survived significantly longer than the patients who took FOLFIRI plus bevacizumab.

“In a European phase III FIRE-3 trial reported in The Lancet Oncology, Heinemann et al found no difference in response rate, the primary endpoint, between FOLFIRI (fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan) plus the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab (Erbitux) vs FOLFIRI plus the anti-VEGF-A antibody bevacizumab (Avastin) in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. The cetuximab-containing regimen was associated with a significant overall survival advantage…

“In this open-label trial, 592 patients with KRAS exon 2 codon 12/13 wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer aged 18 to 75 years from centers in Germany and Austria were randomly assigned between January 2007 and September 2012 to receive FOLFIRI plus either cetuximab (n = 297) or bevacizumab (n = 295). The primary endpoint was objective response in the intention-to-treat population. The study has completed recruitment, but patient follow-up is ongoing.”


Dutch Phase II Study Supports Phase III Evaluation of Bevacizumab Plus Lomustine, but Not Bevacizumab Alone, in Recurrent Glioblastoma

The gist: Researchers conducted a clinical trial with volunteer patients to test two drugs, alone and in combination, for recurrent glioblastoma. The two drugs tested were bevacizumab (aka Avastin) and lomustine (aka CeeNU). The researchers found promising results for patients who took both bevacizumab and lomustine, and recommend that further clinical trials be conducted to continue to study the new combination treatment. The patients who participated in the study all had glioblastoma that was treated with temozolomide chemoradiotherapy, but recurred.

“Bevacizumab (Avastin) is frequently used in patients with recurrent glioblastoma, although it is unclear whether responses observed with such treatment result in improved overall survival. In the phase II Dutch BELOB study reported in The Lancet Oncology, Taal et al found that overall survival results supported phase III evaluation of the combination of bevacizumab and lomustine (CeeNU) but not bevacizumab monotherapy…

“In this open-label trial, 153 adult patients from 14 Dutch hospitals with a first recurrence of glioblastoma after temozolomide chemoradiotherapy were randomly assigned between December 2009 and November 2011 to receive oral lomustine at 110 mg/m2 once every 6 weeks, intravenous bevacizumab at 10 mg/kg once every 2 weeks, or combination treatment at the same doses. The primary endpoint outcome was overall survival at 9 months in the intent-to-treat population.

“A preplanned safety analysis after eight patients had received the combination regimen showed that three had grade 3 and two had grade 4 thrombocytopenia, with these toxicities requiring a reduction in bevacizumab dose intensity. The lomustine dose in the combination group was subsequently reduced to 90 mg/m2. In addition to the eight combination recipients getting the higher lomustine dose, 51 received bevacizumab alone, 47 received lomustine alone, and 47 received bevacizumab plus lomustine at 90 mg/m2.

“The investigators concluded, ‘The combination of bevacizumab and lomustine met prespecified criteria for assessment of this treatment in further phase 3 studies. However, the results in the bevacizumab alone group do not justify further studies of this treatment.’ ”