Researchers Reveal Biomarker for Guiding Prostate Cancer Treatment

Excerpt:

“Back-to-back discoveries from Cleveland Clinic demonstrate for the first time how a testosterone-related genetic abnormality can help predict individual patient responses to specific prostate cancer therapies.

“The studies, published in the October 12 issue of JAMA Oncology, suggest that men who inherit this  would benefit from a personalized treatment plan that targets specific hormonal pathways.”

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Blood Tumor Markers May Warn When Lung Cancer Patients Are Progressing on Targeted Treatments

Excerpt:

“For many years, oncologists have known that cancers can secrete complex molecules into the blood and that levels of these molecules can be easily measured. These so-called ‘tumor markers’ are traditionally associated with a single dominant cancer type, for example Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) linked to prostate cancer, Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) to colorectal cancer, CA125 to ovarian cancer, CA19.9 to pancreatic cancer and CA27.29 to breast cancer. However, the real challenge has been to determine a practical use for these markers. They don’t appear to be useful as a means of screening otherwise healthy people for evidence of underlying cancers.”

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A New Prognostic Classification May Help Clinical Decision-Making in Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“New research shows that taking molecular variables into account will improve the prognostic classification of the lethal brain cancer called glioblastoma (GBM).

“The study was led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC – James).

“Published in the journal JAMA Oncology, the study found that adding significant molecular biomarkers to the existing GBM classification system improves the prognostic classification of GBM patients who have been treated with radiation and the drug temozolomide.”

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Markers for Prostate Cancer Death Can Identify Men in Need of More Aggressive Treatment

Excerpt:

“Prostate cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of male cancer death in the United States with an estimated 26,000 deaths in 2016. Two-thirds of all PC deaths observed in the US are men with localized disease who developed metastasis. Several markers for dying from prostate cancer exist, but whether these are markers for telling who is likely to die early from any cause, and how their performance compares, is unknown. Identifying such a marker is important because we can then identify which men may benefit from new, more aggressive treatments for prostate cancer.”

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Update on Immunotherapy for Advanced Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Checkpoint blockade has been a revolutionary advance in cancer treatment, supported by extensive pre-clinical and phase II/III clinical data. Recent long-term survival data suggest that immunotherapy may actually be curing some patients with advanced melanoma. In addition, potential biomarkers may help select the best immunotherapy for each patient.”

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Oxnard Explains Role of BRAF in NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Geoffrey R. Oxnard, MD, specializes in researching molecular mutations in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a particular emphasis on prognostic and predictive biomarkers. Oxnard, who is an assistant professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a thoracic oncologist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, spoke with Targeted Oncology about the potential for BRAF-targeting therapies in NSCLC.

“TARGETED ONCOLOGY: What is the potential for utilizing currently available BRAF/MEK-targeted therapies in treating patients with NSCLC?

“Oxnard: Combination BRAF/MEK inhibitor therapy is a very compelling approach because combinations of BRAF and MEK inhibitors have clearly been shown to improve response rates and overall survival in melanomas harboring BRAF V600E mutations when compared with single-agent BRAF inhibition.”

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ASCO Issues New Guideline on Use of Biomarkers to Guide Early Breast Cancer Therapy Decisions

“The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) today issued a new clinical practice guideline for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer and known hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptor status. The guideline includes evidence-based recommendations on the appropriate use of breast tumor biomarker tests to guide decisions on adjuvant systemic therapy.

” ‘In the era of precision medicine, the role of biomarkers in guiding clinical care is greater than in the past. An extensive number of new tests have come out in the last 5-10 years, but not all have sufficient evidence of clinical utility,’ said Lyndsay N. Harris, MD, co-chair of the ASCO expert panel that developed the guideline. ‘These latest recommendations truly inform physicians about which tests need to be performed. But this is not all that goes into patient care—doctors need to continue discussions with patients to develop individualized treatment plans.’ “


Jason Luke on Significance of Biomarker Development for Immunotherapy in Melanoma

“Although nivolumab (Opdivo) and ipilimumab (Yervoy) together demonstrate superior survival in previously untreated patients with advanced melanoma, the combination comes with additional toxicity and an increased price tag, says Jason Luke, MD, assistant professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago Medicine.

“ ‘There have been several studies designed around trying to predict which patients are most likely to benefit from anti–PD-1 or immunotherapy combinations. I really think that is going to be an essential part of the future approach to treatment, says Luke. ‘Not all patients respond to these treatments. There are additional toxicities with the combinations, and there are also cost issues because of how catastrophically expensive these drugs are. We really need to know which patients are most likely to respond and which aren’t.’ “


Urine Biomarkers May Reduce Repeat Biopsies for Prostate Cancer

“Incorporating scores from two urine-based biomarker assays may reduce the number of biopsies men with clinically localized prostate cancer need to undergo without greatly affecting 10-year survival rates, according to the results of a decision analysis.

“ ‘Results from recent studies have demonstrated the potential clinical utility of the urine-based PROGENSA prostate cancer antigen 3 (PCA3) assay (Gen-Probe, Inc.) to predict repeat biopsy outcomes in men with elevated serum PSA levels and previous negative biopsy findings,’ Brian T. Denton, PhD, associate professor of industrial and operations engineering at University of Michigan, and colleagues wrote. ‘A recent literature review reported current evidence suggesting that the PCA3 test is clinically useful for selecting which patients should undergo repeat biopsy. Several studies have determined that urine assessment of [T2:ERG] is also associated with biopsy outcome and may be better at discriminating between low-grade and high-grade cancers.‘ “

“Denton and colleagues performed a decision analysis using a decision tree to evaluate the clinical value of using PCA3 and T2:ERG scores to determine the need for repeat biopsy in men with clinically localized prostate cancer who had at least one prior negative biopsy. Researchers estimated the probability for cancer by using the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial Risk Calculator.”