Three-Drug Regimen Active in BRAF-Mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Triplet therapy for advanced, BRAF V600-mutant melanoma led to objective responses in 73% of a small group of patients enrolled in a phase I trial, according to updated results reported at the 2017 ESMO Annual Congress in Madrid.

“Ongoing follow-up in the trial showed that 11 of 15 patients responded to the combination of pembrolizumab (Keytruda), dabrafenib (Tafinlar), and trametinib (Mekinist). Seven of the 11 responding patients had not progressed after a median follow-up of 20 months. ‘Updated results of the phase I portion of the KEYNOTE-022 trial confirmed previously reported efficacy of this triplet combination,’ said Antoni Ribas, MD, PhD, a professor of medicine, surgery, and molecular and medical pharmacology at the University of California at Los Angeles. ‘The results demonstrated durability of responses. No late or unexpected toxicities occurred with longer follow-up. The randomized phase II portion of KEYNOTE-022 is ongoing.’ ”

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Array BioPharma Announces FDA Acceptance For Review Of Binimetinib And Encorafenib New Drug Applications For Patients With Advanced BRAF-mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Array BioPharma (ARRY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted for review its New Drug Applications (NDAs) to support use of the combination of binimetinib 45 mg twice daily and encorafenib 450 mg once daily (COMBO450) for the treatment of patients with BRAF-mutant advanced, unresectable or metastatic melanoma. The FDA set a target action date under the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) of June 30, 2018 for both applications. In addition, the FDA informed Array that based on their preliminary review of the applications they have not identified any potential review issues, and that they are not currently planning to hold an advisory committee meeting to discuss these NDAs.  Array completed its NDA submissions at the end of June 2017based on findings from the pivotal Phase 3 COLUMBUS trial.”

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Novartis Posts a Win, Roche a Flop in Skin Cancer Trials

Excerpt:

“Swiss drugmaker Novartis notched a trial win for its drug cocktail against skin cancer on Monday, while a rival treatment from Roche with slipping sales failed in a separate study with a similar patient group.

“All the medicines were tested in melanoma patients who had undergone surgery to cut out tumors and had a genetic mutation called BRAF, making them likely to respond to the targeted cancer pills. Patients with BRAF mutations constitute around half of the melanoma population.”

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Targeted BRAF/MEK Inhibitor Combination Achieves Long-Term Survival in Melanoma

Excerpt:

“More than one-fourth of patients with advanced BRAF V600-mutant melanoma remained alive at 5 years after treatment with the combination of dabrafenib (Tafinlar) and trametinib (Mekinist), long-term follow-up from a randomized trial showed.

“In the subgroup of patients with normal baseline lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and fewer than 3 organ sites with metastases, half remained at alive at 5 years. No new safety signals emerged during long-term follow-up, as reported at the 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago.”

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FDA Approves Tafinlar Plus Mekinist for BRAF V600E–Mutant Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“The FDA approved use of dabrafenib in combination with trametinib for treatment of patients with metastatic non–small cell lung cancer whose tumors harbor BRAF V600E mutations, according to the agents’ manufacturer.

“The combination of dabrafenib (Tafinlar, Novartis) — a BRAF inhibitor — and trametinib (Mekinist, Novartis), a MEK1/2 inhibitor — is the first targeted treatment approved in the United States specifically for patients with BRAF V600E–positive metastatic NSCLC.”

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Metastatic Melanoma: Not Quite Curable…But Getting There


By 2050, the number of deaths due to malignant melanoma in the U.S. could be three times lower than peak levels reached before 1960. Researchers presented the data behind this prediction at the 2017 European Cancer Congress in January.

It is unclear how much of this anticipated decline in deaths can be attributed to the availability of new, effective treatments. However, it is obvious that much-increased awareness of sunlight exposure as the single factor most responsible for the development of skin melanoma has contributed to lower incidence of the disease.

In any case, the armament of treatments available for metastatic melanoma is currently such that this diagnosis has transformed from being almost universally fatal (even just a few years ago) into a being largely treatable. Since 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved eight new drugs for melanoma. Continue reading…


Array BioPharma and Pierre Fabre Announce COLUMBUS Phase 3 Study of Encorafenib plus Binimetinib For BRAF-Mutant Melanoma Met Primary Endpoint

Excerpt:

“Array BioPharma (Nasdaq: ARRY) and Pierre Fabre today jointly announced top-line results from Part 1 of the Phase 3 COLUMBUS (Combined LGX818 Used with MEK162 in BRAF Mutant UnresectableSkin Cancer) study evaluating LGX818 (encorafenib), a BRAF inhibitor, and MEK162 (binimetinib), a MEK inhibitor, in patients with BRAF-mutant advanced, unresectable or metastatic melanoma. The study met its primary endpoint, significantly improving progression free survival (PFS) compared with vemurafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, alone.”

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Melanoma: New Drugs and New Challenges (Part 2 of 2)


Editor’s note: This is part 2 of a 2-part post on the latest research in melanoma. To learn about research into drug combinations for melanoma that may work better than single drugs, check out Melanoma: New Drugs and New Challenges (Part 1 of 2).

As always, the more new treatments become available in melanoma, the more new challenges arise. With eight new drugs approved for melanoma in the last five years, oncologists may sometimes face the difficult choice of what drugs to choose for a patient’s first-line treatment. Immune checkpoint drugs sometimes cause serious side effects, but progress is being made on how to treat these and also how to treat patients with pre-existing autoimmune conditions. New approaches are needed in efforts to prevent recurrence of melanomas diagnosed at earlier stages of disease progression. These and other challenges are discussed below. Continue reading…


Final OS Analysis Confirms Cobimetinib/Vemurafenib Benefit in Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Combination therapy with cobimetinib (Cotellic) and vemurafenib (Zelboraf) reduced the risk of death by 30% compared with vemurafenib alone in patients with BRAF-positive advanced melanoma, according to the final survival analysis of the phase III coBRIM study that has now been published in The Lancet Oncology.

“The targeted combination improved median overall survival (OS) by 4.9 months versus single-agent vemurafenib (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.55-0.90; P = .005). The OS rates for the combination at 1 and 2 years were 74.5% and 48.3%, respectively.

“ ‘Melanoma is one of the few cancers that has increased in incidence over the past 30 years, and until recently, people with advanced forms of the disease have had few treatment options. Five years ago, the survival of people with advanced melanoma was measured in months, and now we have medicines that are helping people live years,’ Josina Reddy, MD, PhD, senior group medical director at Genentech, the company that manufactures the combination, said in an interview with OncLive.”

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