3-Year Follow-Up Data for Dabrafenib/Trametinib Confirm Results of Combo in Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Three-year follow-up data from the phase III COMBI-d study was presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting, revealing impressive overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) data for the dabrafenib (Tafinlar) and trametinib (Mekinist) combination therapy for patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma.

“At the February 15, 2016 data cutoff for the 3-year analysis, 58% of patients remained on therapy. The 3-year PFS rate with the combination was 22% versus 12% with single-agent dabrafenib. The 3-year OS rate was 44% with dabrafenib plus trametinib compared with 32% with dabrafenib alone.

” ‘This is the longest OS follow-up among randomized phase III trials evaluating a BRAF plus MEK inhibitor in patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma,’ said lead investigator Keith T. Flaherty, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center and Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. ‘With additional follow-up, and now 3-year maturity, dabrafenib plus trametinib continued to show significant benefit over dabrafenib monotherapy, despite crossover.’ ”

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Combining BRAF Inhibition, Anti-PD-1 No Help in BRAF-Mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma obtained no survival benefit from combined treatment of anti-BRAF therapy and an immune checkpoint inhibitor, a retrospective analysis showed.

“Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.0 to 6.5 months in BRAF-inhibitor naive patients who received a PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitor alone or with a BRAF inhibitor. Patients with prior exposure to a BRAF inhibitor had a median PFS of 8.0 months with anti–PD-1 therapy and 4.5 months with combined treatment. Median overall survival was 10.5 to 12 months with a PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitor alone or in combination with a BRAF inhibitor, regardless of prior BRAF inhibitor exposure status.

“ ‘BRAF inhibitor-refractory patients derived no additional benefit with anti-PD therapy in combination with BRAF inhibition,’ Wen-Jen Hwu, MD, of MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and colleagues concluded in a poster presentation at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago. ‘Clinical findings are similar with either anti-PD alone or in combination with BRAF inhibition in terms of objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and overall survival (OS).’ ”

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Dabrafenib/Trametinib Combo Highly Effective in BRAF-Mutant NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The combination of dabrafenib (Tafinlar) and trametinib (Mekinist) was highly effective as a treatment for patients with BRAF V600E-mutant non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to lead investigator David Planchard MD, PhD, who presented the phase II data at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting.1 Findings from the study were also concurrently published in Lancet Oncology.2

“The investigator assessed objective response rate (ORR) with the combination was 63% (95% CI, 49-75), which lasted for a median duration of 9.0 months (95% CI, 6.9-18.3). When adding those with stable disease for ≥12 weeks, the overall disease control rate was 79% (95% CI, 66-89). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-19.6).

“In addition to the combination cohort, the study also included a single-agent arm that included 78 previously treated patients with metastatic BRAF V600E–mutant NSCLC. In this cohort, the ORR with single-agent dabrafenib was 33% and the median PFS was 5.5 month. Findings from both cohorts of the study have led to breakthrough therapy designations from the FDA for dabrafenib as a single agent and in combination with trametinib.”

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Distinct Features Associated With Benefit for BRAF/MEK Inhibition

Excerpt:

“With the development of novel targeted and immunotherapeutic agents that are more efficacious than traditional chemotherapy, treatment paradigms in melanoma have undergone major changes. Current recommendations for first-line systemic therapy for patients with advanced or metastatic melanoma consider BRAF mutation status, tumor growth rate, and the presence or absence of cancer-related symptoms.

“Immunotherapies with agents that block CTLA-4 or PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoints have been associated with durable responses in a subset of patients, and are often considered for patients with low-volume, asymptomatic metastatic melanoma. Targeted therapies, on the other side, are preferred for patients with BRAF-mutant tumors who have symptomatic disease and benefit from the rapid response associated with these agents.”

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Dabrafenib Active in BRAF-Mutant Metastatic NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Planchard et al found that the BRAF kinase inhibitor dabrafenib (Tafinlar) produced responses in previously treated and untreated patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a phase II trial reported in The Lancet Oncology. Activating BRAF V600E mutations are found in approximately 1% to 2% of lung adenocarcinomas.”

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New RAF-targeted Therapeutic Shows Early Promise Against Tumors With BRAF and RAS Mutations

Excerpt:

“The new investigational anticancer therapeutic BGB-283, which targets the RAF family of proteins, was safe, tolerable, and showed signs of clinical activity in patients who had a range of types of cancer with mutations in BRAF, KRAS, and NRAS, according to results from a phase I clinical trial presented here at the AACR Annual Meeting 2016, April 16-20.

“ ‘BRAF gene mutations fuel cancer cell proliferation and survival in a number of types of cancer, including melanoma, and thyroid and colorectal cancers,’ said Jayesh Desai, FRACP, a medical oncologist at The Royal Melbourne Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. ‘In melanoma, the BRAF V600E mutation predominates, and specific inhibitors of the BRAF V600E mutant protein have been approved for treating patients with melanoma with BRAF V600E gene mutations.’ ”

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Opdivo Plus Yervoy Gets FDA OK for Melanoma

“Indications for the blockbuster cancer drug nivolumab (Opdivo) have expanded again, as the FDA has approved the anti-PD-1 antibody in combination with ipilimumab (Yervoy) for treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma.

“The indication includes both BRAF-wild type and BRAF-mutant melanoma. At the same time, the FDA expanded the indication for single-agent nivolumb to include patients with previously untreated BRAF-wild type melanoma.

“Granted by the FDA’s accelerated approval process, the indication is the seventh for nivolumab, both indications leave the door open for the FDA to request confirmatory data or clinical trials. The approvals increase the number of nivolumab indications to seven, including four in melanoma, all granted since late 2014.”


Experts Grapple With Nuances of Navigating New Frontier in Melanoma

“Emerging data showing improved survival with targeted and immunotherapeutic approaches are rapidly altering the standard of care for patients with melanoma. For BRAF-positive patients with metastatic or unresectable melanoma, the standard of care includes a BRAF inhibitor in combination with a MEK inhibitor. For patients with or without BRAF mutations, there are immunotherapeutic options available in frontline and in resistant disease settings.

“Questions remain, however, in terms of how to optimally sequence and/or combine both targeted agents and immunotherapies. And, for BRAF-mutant disease, when is it appropriate to switch from a targeted approach to an immunotherapeutic one?”


The Growing Arsenal of Immunotherapy Drugs for Melanoma


Large numbers of immune cells (T cells in particular) are frequently found within or adjacent to melanoma tumors, indicating that the tumors attract the attention—if not the action—of the immune system. True to its reputation as one of the most ‘immunogenic‘ cancers, melanoma now has more U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved immunotherapy (immune system-targeting) drugs than any other cancer type. As a consequence, metastatic melanoma is no longer the universally fatal disease it was even just 3 or 4 years ago. Continue reading…