Study Splits Incurable Childhood Brain Tumors Into 10 New Diseases

Excerpt:

“Scientists have found that deadly childhood brain tumours are actually 10 different diseases that should each be diagnosed and treated based on their specific genetic faults.

“The major new study has important implications for treatment, since personalising care for each type of   is likely to be much more effective than grouping them all together as one.

“A team at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, found stark differences among ‘s ‘high grade’ , or gliomas, and that they could be split into at least 10 different cancers.”

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Combination of Optune® with Temozolomide Demonstrates Unprecedented Five-Year Survival for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Patients

Excerpt:

“Novocure (NVCR) announced today results from its phase 3 pivotal EF-14 trial adding Optune to temozolomide for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM), including results from health-related quality of life analyses, were presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s (ASTRO) 2017 Annual Meeting in San Diego. This marks the first presentation of EF-14 five-year survival and quality of life data at a radiation oncology conference.

“A late-breaking oral presentation focused on Novocure’s EF-14 phase 3 pivotal trial, which demonstrated unprecedented five-year survival results in newly diagnosed GBM. Patients treated with Optune in combination with temozolomide experienced a significant extension of overall survival without added toxicity compared to patients treated with temozolomide alone. The data also showed that Optune-treated patients were able to maintain quality of life for longer compared to patients treated with temozolomide alone.”

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A Cancer Doctor Weighs In On CAR-T, Precision Medicine And Pricing Debates

Excerpt:

“Yesterday’s historic FDA approval of the first engineered T-cell treatment for cancer, Novartis’ Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel), was accompanied by inevitable questions about how the product would be priced. In the end, Novartis set the price at $475,000, which was lower than many analysts had predicted, considering the treatment is designed to cure some forms of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)—and in clinical trials it did just that for most patients.”

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ACT IV: Rindopepimut Not Effective for Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“The phase 3 study ACT IV showed that rindopepimut, an investigational vaccine against EGFRvIII, did not improve outcomes when added onto temozolomide (Temodar, Merck), the current standard of care. The combination of rindopepimut plus temozolomide provided a median survival of 20.0 months compared with 20.1 months for temozolomide alone in patients with newly diagnosed EGFRvIII glioblastoma and minimal residual disease (MRD) after surgical resection and adjuvant chemoradiation.

“The announcement that the trial results were negative was made some time ago, but full details of those results were published online August 22 in Lancet Oncology.”

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Adjuvant Temozolomide in 1p/19q Non-Codeleted Anaplastic Glioma

Excerpt:

“Interim results of the phase III CATNON trial (EORTC study 26053-22054) indicate a survival benefit of adjuvant temozolomide in 1p/19q non-codeleted anaplastic glioma. These findings were reported in The Lancet by van den Bent et al.

“In the open-label 2 x 2 factorial trial, 745 adult patients with newly diagnosed disease were randomized 1:1:1:1 between December 2007 and September 2015 to receive radiotherapy (59.4 Gy in 33 fractions of 1.8 Gy) alone (n = 187) or with (n = 185) adjuvant temozolomide (12 4-week cycles of 150–200 mg/m² given on days 1–5) or to receive radiotherapy with concurrent temozolomide at 75 mg/m²/d with (n = 188) or without (n = 185) adjuvant temozolomide.”

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Potential Treatment for Brain Cancer as Drug Shrinks Tumours

Excerpt:

“An international team of researchers has found a drug previously approved to treat breast cancer could also be used to shrink medulloblastoma, a common form of childhood brain tumour.

“The discovery, made by The University of Queensland’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, has led to a clinical trial using the drug palbociclib to treat children with medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumour found in children.”

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A Cancer Conundrum: Too Many Drug Trials, Too Few Patients

Excerpt:

“With the arrival of two revolutionary treatment strategies, immunotherapy and personalized medicine, cancer researchers have found new hope — and a problem that is perhaps unprecedented in medical research.

“There are too many experimental cancer drugs in too many clinical trials, and not enough patients to test them on.

“The logjam is caused partly by companies hoping to rush profitable new cancer drugs to market, and partly by the nature of these therapies, which can be spectacularly effective but only in select patients.”

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New Guidelines Aim Treat Brain Tumors More Effectively

Excerpt:

“A University of Portsmouth academic has helped to develop European guidelines to treat brain tumours more effectively.

“Geoff Pilkington, Professor of Cellular and Molecular Neuro-oncology and one of the UK’s leading brain tumour specialists, was one of only three UK academics who devised the European Association for Neuro-Oncology (EANO) guidelines on the diagnosis and  of  with astrocytic and oligodendroglial gliomas, including glioblastomas.”

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Using Alternative Medicine Only for Cancer Linked to Lower Survival Rate

Excerpt:

“Patients who choose to receive alternative therapy as treatment for curable cancers instead of conventional cancer treatment have a higher risk of death, according to researchers from the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research (COPPER) Center at Yale School of Medicine and Yale Cancer Center. The findings were reported online by the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

“There is increasing interest by  and families in pursuing alternative medicine as opposed to conventional  treatment. This trend has created a difficult situation for patients and providers. Although it is widely believed that conventional cancer treatment will provide the greatest chance at cure, there is limited research evaluating the effectiveness of alternative medicine for cancer.”

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