Case Report in the Journal of Neurosurgery Highlights Potential of ONC201 in H3 K27M-mutant DIPG

Last fall, we announced our collaboration with Musella FoundationxCuresThe Cure Starts Now FoundationMichael Mosier Defeat DIPG Foundationand Oncoceutics to help patients access ONC201, a new, experimental treatment for a type of brain tumor known as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), as well as other gliomas with a genetic mutation known as H3 K27M. Oncoceutics now reports the publication of a case study of a 10-year-old patient for whom ONC201 provided noteworthy results:

Philadelphia, PA (April 9, 2019) – Oncoceutics announced today the publication of an article entitled “First clinical experience with DRD2/3 antagonist ONC201 in H3 K27M–mutant pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma: a case report” in the Journal of Neurosurgery (authored by Matthew D. Hall, M.D., MBA). The article summarizes the medical history of a 10-year-old girl with a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) brain tumor. Following radiation therapy and treatment with ONC201 on a compassionate use basis, she developed near complete resolution of her presenting neurological symptoms for almost one year, enabling her return to school and participation in many normal activities. Continue reading…


NCCN 2019 Annual Conference Includes Focus on Patient Experience with Innovative Therapies, Plus Updates on Biomarkers, Biosimilars, and the Latest Research on Cancer Care

Excerpt:

“More than 1,500 cancer care professionals are meeting in Orlando, Florida, March 21-23, for the NCCN 2019 Annual Conference, presented by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)—an alliance of 28 leading cancer centers. The conference offers more than 25 sessions presenting the latest treatment recommendations for lung, breast, prostate, colon, and other cancers, including new and emerging therapies. Other key topics include coordination of care, pain management during an opioid crisis, biosimilars, cancer-associated distress, biomarkers, genetic testing, and appropriate transition to end-of-life care. The keynote session highlights the benefits and challenges of treatment with new and innovative therapies (e.g. CAR T-cell) from the perspective of the patient and the clinicians caring for them.”

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Structural and Clinical Barriers Keep 3 of 4 Cancer Patients from Participating in Trials

Excerpt:

“A new meta-analysis led by Dr. Joseph Unger of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has revealed that structural and clinical barriers prevent more than 3 out of 4 cancer patients from participating in clinical trials.

“The study is part of an ongoing effort to understand why patient participation is so low in cancer clinical trials. Unger, a health services researcher and biostatistician who focuses on disparities in cancer research, published his findings today in JNCI, the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.”

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Researchers Tap Genomic Technology to Develop Personalized Treatments for Pediatric Glioma

Excerpt:

“Researchers at UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospitals are using next-generation genomic technology to develop targeted therapies for high-grade pediatric glioma.

“Sabine Mueller, MD, PhD, adjunct associate professor of neurology, pediatrics and neurosurgery at University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues aim to treat as many as 44 children and young adults with this disease.”

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Promising Developments for Brain Tumor Drug ONC201

In September, we announced our collaboration with Musella FoundationxCures, and Oncoceutics to help patients access ONC201, a potential new treatment for a type of brain tumor known as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), as well as other gliomas with a genetic mutation known as H3 K27M.

Since then, several news stories have reported promising developments for ONC201. Check out the coverage:

  • The Philadelphia Inquirer: “Cancer therapy shows promise for some brain tumors”
  • Atrium Health: “Finding hope in the face of brain cancer: After being diagnosed with a brain tumor, Amanda’s future was uncertain. But participating in a Phase 2 clinical trial has given her more time, more hope and a new mission.” (Also covered on WSOC-TV)
  • Michigan Medicine: “Brain cancer patient finds hope with emerging new therapy”
  • Omaha World-Herald: “Experimental drug ‘nothing short of miraculous’ for father of 4 with super-rare brain tumor”

To learn more about our ONC201 project, click here.


Immune Cells Track Hard-To-Target Brain Tumours

Excerpt:

“Instructing the immune system to recognize and kill tumours, an approach termed cancer immunotherapy, has transformed the clinical treatment of certain types of malignancy. Prominent among these therapies are immune-checkpoint inhibitors, which block the action of proteins that dampen immune-cell responses against tumours. For example, antibodies can be used to interfere with the inhibitory protein PD-1, which is present on T cells, a type of immune cell that attacks tumours. Immune-checkpoint inhibitors have been most successfully used to treat cancers, such as melanomas, that are well infiltrated by T cells and have a large number of genetic mutationsA subset of these mutations might generate neoantigens — altered protein sequences that are uniquely produced in cancer cells and are recognized as foreign by the immune system.”

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Yale Cancer Center Scientists Advise Caution in Immunotherapy Research

Excerpt:

“In a new study by Yale Cancer Center, scientists suggest that as the number of clinical trials in cancer immunotherapy grows exponentially, some caution should be exercised as we continue to better understand the biology of these new therapeutic targets.  The findings are published today in the journal Cell.

“Researchers around the world have been racing to create therapies that unleash the power of our immune systems against cancer. The most successful of these immunotherapies, which target a molecular pathway known as PD-1/PD-L1, have brightened the landscape for many people suffering with lung cancer and other types of tumors.”

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ASCO and Friends of Cancer Research Applaud NCI’s Expansion of Clinical Trial Eligibility Criteria

Excerpt:

“ASCO and Friends of Cancer Research (Friends) applaud the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) recent revision of its clinical trial protocol template to broaden eligibility criteria for cancer clinical trials. The protocol template was expanded to help increase the opportunity for participation in NCI-funded clinical trials for patients with certain health-care conditions, as well as to provide an opportunity for patients younger than age 18 to participate in adult clinical trials in certain circumstances.”

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How Can We Unleash the Immune System?

Excerpt:

“Cancer has an insidious talent for evading the natural defenses that should destroy it. What if we could find ways to help the immune system fight back?

“It has begun to happen. The growing field of immunotherapy is profoundly changing cancer treatment and has rescued many people with advanced malignancies that not long ago would have been a death sentence.”

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If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.