Commission on Cancer Identify “Top 5” Tests, Treatments to Question

“It is with an eye toward improved patient care and better outcomes that various medical specialties have willingly undertaken the self-censure of weeding out the potentially unnecessary tests, treatments and procedures in their fields of medicine.

“Through the ABIM foundation’s Choosing Wisely initiative, organizations from several medical specialties have been composing lists of medical tests, procedures and therapies that practitioners and patients may be wise to question.

“Because time is of the essence in cancer diagnosis and treatment, it is particularly important to not waste it with testing and/or treatment that may not be necessary or beneficial. To this end, the Commission on Cancer (CoC) lists the following tests/treatments to question.”


Myc-Driven Tumors Could be Next for Targeted Therapies

Scientists have made a breakthrough in inhibiting the tumor-driving protein myc, which previously had been impossible to target with drugs. Myc drives cells toward uncontrolled growth in tumors, and is involved in many of the most serious forms of cancer, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, brain cancer, prostate cancer, and blood cancer. Scientists have found that one drug that indirectly targets myc slows tumor growth in a mouse model of myc-driven cancer. The key to the breakthrough was recognizing that myc relies partially on MTOR, another protein, for its protein supply. By targeting MTOR, the drug keeps myc from promoting tumor growth. The drug, called MLN0128, is already in clinical trials for a variety of cancers, but this is the first time it has been viewed as a tool to treat myc-driven cancer. The researchers said that other indirect targeted therapy drugs are already being tested in human studies to treat myc-driven tumors.


Myc-Driven Tumors Could be Next for Targeted Therapies

Scientists have made a breakthrough in inhibiting the tumor-driving protein myc, which previously had been impossible to target with drugs. Myc drives cells toward uncontrolled growth in tumors, and is involved in many of the most serious forms of cancer, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, brain cancer, prostate cancer, and blood cancer. Scientists have found that one drug that indirectly targets myc slows tumor growth in a mouse model of myc-driven cancer. The key to the breakthrough was recognizing that myc relies partially on MTOR, another protein, for its protein supply. By targeting MTOR, the drug keeps myc from promoting tumor growth. The drug, called MLN0128, is already in clinical trials for a variety of cancers, but this is the first time it has been viewed as a tool to treat myc-driven cancer. The researchers said that other indirect targeted therapy drugs are already being tested in human studies to treat myc-driven tumors.


Myc-Driven Tumors Could be Next for Targeted Therapies

Scientists have made a breakthrough in inhibiting the tumor-driving protein myc, which previously had been impossible to target with drugs. Myc drives cells toward uncontrolled growth in tumors, and is involved in many of the most serious forms of cancer, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, brain cancer, prostate cancer, and blood cancer. Scientists have found that one drug that indirectly targets myc slows tumor growth in a mouse model of myc-driven cancer. The key to the breakthrough was recognizing that myc relies partially on MTOR, another protein, for its protein supply. By targeting MTOR, the drug keeps myc from promoting tumor growth. The drug, called MLN0128, is already in clinical trials for a variety of cancers, but this is the first time it has been viewed as a tool to treat myc-driven cancer. The researchers said that other indirect targeted therapy drugs are already being tested in human studies to treat myc-driven tumors.


Clinical Trials Slated for Treatment That Shrinks All Tumors Tested

Last year, a PNAS study showed that the surfaces of many tumor cells have a protein called CD47, which protects them from the immune system. But when these tumors are treated with a drug that inhibits CD47, they get attacked by immune system cells. The researchers transplanted seven kinds of human tumors into mice and treated them with the CD47-targeting drug. All of the tumors—bladder, brain, breast, colon, liver, ovary, and prostate—shrank or disappeared, which kept them from spreading. Now, the research will progress to clinical trials, thanks to a $20 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. CD47 was originally found on leukemia and lymphoma cells; the initial trial will target the stem cells that perpetuate acute myeloid leukemia. This cancer of the blood and bone marrow is fatal within months if untreated, and the 5-year survival rate is only 30% to 40%, even with aggressive treatments including chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants.


Clinical Trials Slated for Treatment That Shrinks All Tumors Tested

Last year, a PNAS study showed that the surfaces of many tumor cells have a protein called CD47, which protects them from the immune system. But when these tumors are treated with a drug that inhibits CD47, they get attacked by immune system cells. The researchers transplanted seven kinds of human tumors into mice and treated them with the CD47-targeting drug. All of the tumors—bladder, brain, breast, colon, liver, ovary, and prostate—shrank or disappeared, which kept them from spreading. Now, the research will progress to clinical trials, thanks to a $20 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. CD47 was originally found on leukemia and lymphoma cells; the initial trial will target the stem cells that perpetuate acute myeloid leukemia. This cancer of the blood and bone marrow is fatal within months if untreated, and the 5-year survival rate is only 30% to 40%, even with aggressive treatments including chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants.


Clinical Trials Slated for Treatment That Shrinks All Tumors Tested

Last year, a PNAS study showed that the surfaces of many tumor cells have a protein called CD47, which protects them from the immune system. But when these tumors are treated with a drug that inhibits CD47, they get attacked by immune system cells. The researchers transplanted seven kinds of human tumors into mice and treated them with the CD47-targeting drug. All of the tumors—bladder, brain, breast, colon, liver, ovary, and prostate—shrank or disappeared, which kept them from spreading. Now, the research will progress to clinical trials, thanks to a $20 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. CD47 was originally found on leukemia and lymphoma cells; the initial trial will target the stem cells that perpetuate acute myeloid leukemia. This cancer of the blood and bone marrow is fatal within months if untreated, and the 5-year survival rate is only 30% to 40%, even with aggressive treatments including chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants.