BRCA Mutations Don’t Hurt Breast Cancer Survival

Excerpt:

“Women who have BRCA mutations do just as well after treatment for breast cancer as other patients, British researchers reported Thursday.

“It’s good news for people with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations that raise their risk of cancer. If they get cancer and have standard treatment, they live as long as breast cancer patients without the mutation.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Talazoparib Superior to Chemotherapy in BRCA-Associated Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Approximately 5% of patients with sporadic breast cancer harbor mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2; genes that are involved in the DNA repair process. Several phase I/II clinical studies have shown activity of single agent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and BRCA1/2 mutations. Recently in the randomized phase III OlympiAD trial, the PARP inhibitor olaparib improved progression-free survival (PFS) by 2.8 months over standard chemotherapy in patients with human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)–negative MBC and germline BRCA mutations.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Age-Specific Overall Risk of Breast, Ovarian Cancer Among Women With BRCA1/2 Genetic Mutations

Excerpt:

“Researchers conducted an analysis that included nearly 10,000 women with the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic mutations to estimate the age-specific risk of breast or ovarian cancer for women with these mutations, according to a study published by JAMA.

“The optimal clinical management of women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations depends on accurate age specific cancer risk estimates. These can be used to estimate the absolute risk reduction from preventive strategies and to inform decisions about the age at which to begin cancer screening. Antonis C. Antoniou, Ph.D., of the University of Cambridge, England, and colleagues included 6,036 BRCA1 and 3,820 BRCA2 female carriers (5,046 unaffected and 4,810 with breast or ovarian cancer or both at study entry) in the analysis.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Evidence Strong for Platinums in Metastatic BRCA-Related TNBC

Excerpt:

“Clinical data on the role of platinum salts in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) — particularly germline (g) BRCA1-related TNBC — are encouraging in the neoadjuvant setting, where the pathologic complete response rate is improved with the addition of a platinum to anthracycline and taxane-based chemotherapy.

“Data have emerged to show the utility of incorporating platinums into the metastatic setting in TNBC as well, with the strongest evidence for use in patients who are BRCA1/2 mutation carriers or who express a BRCA-like genomic instability signature.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Osteoporosis Drug Shows Promise for Breast Cancer Prevention in BRCA1 Carriers

Excerpt:

“TNFSF11, also known as RANKL, shows potential as a genetic pathway in the prevention of breast cancer for women carrying BRCA1 mutations. Early study findings, published in Nature Medicine, show that a drug currently used in the treatment of osteoporosis, denosumab (Xgeva)—an inhibitor of RANKL—could also be used for the prevention and delay of tumor growth for BRCA1-mutation carriers.

“ ‘These findings imply an integral role for the RANK pathway in tumor initiation in BRCA1-mutation carriers and lend support to clinical studies for the “repurposing” of denosumab as a novel preventative therapy strategy in these and possibly other “high-risk” women,’ wrote study authors.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


BRCA Clinics Expand Further Beyond Breast Cancer

“A new clinic in San Francisco is opening with an unusual mission: to provide care for people affected by mutations in two particular genes linked to a high risk of cancer. The move highlights the ways growing knowledge about the genetics of the disease is reshaping care for patients.

“The clinic, at University of California, San Francisco, will treat patients with abnormalities in the genes known as BRCA1 and BRCA2. The mutations are widely recognized as inheritable causes of breast and ovarian cancers.”


Testing for BRCA Mutations Reaches High Levels Among Young Women With Breast Cancer, Study Finds

“The vast majority of young women with breast cancer are being tested for mutations in the cancer-susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, a new study led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators suggests, and many of them are using the results of those tests to guide their treatment.

“The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Oncology, provides encouraging evidence that patients are largely following National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines that women diagnosed with breast cancer at age 50 or younger undergo genetic testing. At the same time, however, the researchers found that many patients who don’t carry BRCA1 or 2 mutations are choosing to have both breasts removed, even though their risk of cancer in the unaffected breast is no higher than average.”


FDA Grants Olaparib Breakthrough Designation in mCRPC

“Olaparib (Lynparza) has received an FDA breakthrough therapy designation as a treatment for patients with BRCA1/2 or ATM-mutated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in those who have received a prior taxane-based chemotherapy and at least either hormonal agent enzalutamide (Xtandi) or abiraterone acetate (Zytiga).

“The designation, which will accelerate the development and review of the first-in-class oral PARP inhibitor, is based on data from the phase II TOPARP-A trial that demonstrated that olaparib monotherapy had an overall response rate (ORR) of nearly 90% in a biomarker-defined subgroup of patients who had DNA-repair defects.


Early First Cancer in BRCA1/2 Ups Risk in Opposite Breast

“BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have increased risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC), with age at first diagnosis a significant predictor of CBC risk, according to a study published online Dec. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“Alexandra J. van den Broek, from the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam, and colleagues examined overall and age-specific estimates of CBC risk for young patients with breast cancer with or without BRCA1/2 mutations. Data were included for 6,294 patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed under 50 years of age and treated between 1970 and 2003; participants were tested for the most prevalent BRCA1/2 mutations.”