Cabozantinib Active in Carcinoid Tumors and Pancreatic NETs

Excerpt:

“Cabozantinib (Cabometyx) demonstrated promising clinical activity in patients with carcinoid tumors and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) in a phase II trial.

“Patients with advanced carcinoid tumors (n = 41) or pancreatic NETs (n = 20) were enrolled in parallel cohorts. Both groups received 60 mg of oral cabozantinib daily and were restaged every 2 months for the first 6 months, and then every 3 months.”

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Good Outcomes with Cabozantinib in Carcinoid, PNET Tumors

Excerpt:

“Treatment with cabozantinib was tied to objective tumor responses and promising progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with advanced carcinoid and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), researchers reported here.

“With a daily cabozantinib (Cabometyx, Cometriq) treatment, 15% of 20 patients with pNET achieved partial response (95% CI 5-36%) and 75% achieved stable disease (95% CI 53-89%), which was the the trial’s primary endpoint, according to Jennifer Chan, MD, MPH, of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues.”

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Study Finds Cabozantinib Alone or With Erlotinib Improves Outcome in EGFR Wild-Type NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Treatment with the multikinase inhibitor cabozantinib (Cabometyx) alone or with erlotinib (Tarceva) improved progression-free survival vs erlotinib alone in second- or third-line treatment of advanced nonsquamous epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) wild-type non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to the phase II ECOG-ACRIN 1512 trial reported by Neal et al in The Lancet Oncology.”

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