New Blood Test Is More Accurate in Predicting Prostate Cancer Risk Than PSA

Excerpt:

“A team of researchers from Cleveland Clinic, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, and other clinical sites have demonstrated that a new blood test known as IsoPSA detects prostate cancer more precisely than current tests in two crucial measures — distinguishing cancer from benign conditions, and identifying patients with high-risk disease.

“By identifying molecular changes in the prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein, the findings, published online last month by European Urology, suggest that once validated, use of IsoPSA may substantially reduce the need for biopsy, and may thus lower the likelihood of overdetection and overtreatment of nonlethal prostate cancer.”

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Most Popular HRT 'Nearly Trebles Risk of Breast Cancer'

Excerpt:

“A major new study claims women who take the most commonly used form of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) are nearly three times more likely to develop breast cancer than those who do not.

“The Institute of Cancer Research looked at six years of data for 39,000 menopausal women, of whom 775 had developed the illness. It found those taking combined oestrogen-progestogen HRT – the most popular form – were 2.74 times more likely to develop breast cancer than those not using any HRT at all.

“The risk declined when women stopped taking the treatment, while there was no danger at all connected with taking only oestrogen, which accounts for half of all prescriptions.”

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Long-Term Testosterone Therapy Does Not Increase the Risk of Prostate Cancer

“Testosterone (T) therapy is routinely used in men with hypogonadism, a condition in which diminished function of the gonads occurs. Although there is no evidence that T therapy increases the risk of prostate cancer (PCa), there are still concerns and a paucity of long-term data. In a new study in The Journal of Urology, investigators examined three parallel, prospective, ongoing, cumulative registry studies of over 1,000 men. Their analysis showed that long-term T therapy in hypogonadal men is safe and does not increase the risk of PCa.

“Lead investigator Ahmad Haider, MD, PhD, urologist, Bremerhaven, Germany, states, ‘Although considerable evidence exists indicating no relationship between testosterone and increased risk of developing PCa, decades of physician training with the notion that testosterone is fuel for PCa made it difficult to dispel such fallacy and the myth continued to persist. Nevertheless, in the absence of long-term follow-up data demonstrating reduced risk of PCa in hypogonadal men who are receiving T therapy, considerable skepticism remains throughout the medical community and this is an expected natural and acceptable path of medical and scientific discourse. In view of the current evidence, clinicians are compelled to think this over and cannot justify withholding T therapy in hypogonadal men, also in men who have been successfully treated for PCa.’ “


Noncalcified Nodules Predicted Long-Term Lung Cancer Risk

“Noncalcified nodules conveyed long-term lung cancer risk and acted as cancer precursors, according to study results.

“The findings ‘offer support to the idea of utilizing noncalcified nodules as substitute outcomes for chemoprevention,’ the researchers concluded.”


Eating Organic Food Doesn't Lower Your Overall Risk of Cancer, Study Says

“Women who always or mostly eat organic foods have the same likelihood of developing cancer as women who eat conventionally produced foods, according to an Oxford University study.

“Kathryn Bradbury and colleagues in Oxford’s Cancer Epidemiology Unit found no evidence that regularly eating a diet that was grown free from pesticides reduced a woman’s overall risk of cancer.”


Eating Organic Food Doesn't Lower Your Overall Risk of Cancer, Study Says

“Women who always or mostly eat organic foods have the same likelihood of developing cancer as women who eat conventionally produced foods, according to an Oxford University study.

“Kathryn Bradbury and colleagues in Oxford’s Cancer Epidemiology Unit found no evidence that regularly eating a diet that was grown free from pesticides reduced a woman’s overall risk of cancer.”


Eating Organic Food Doesn't Lower Your Overall Risk of Cancer, Study Says

“Women who always or mostly eat organic foods have the same likelihood of developing cancer as women who eat conventionally produced foods, according to an Oxford University study.

“Kathryn Bradbury and colleagues in Oxford’s Cancer Epidemiology Unit found no evidence that regularly eating a diet that was grown free from pesticides reduced a woman’s overall risk of cancer.”


National Poll Shows Public Divided on Genetic Testing to Predict Cancer Risk

“A national poll from the University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute shows 34% of respondents would not seek genetic testing to predict their likelihood of developing a hereditary cancer—even if the cost of the testing was not an issue.

“Concerns about employment and insurability were cited as the primary reason, even though current laws prohibit such discrimination.

The poll also shows only 35% percent of respondents would be extremely or very likely to seek aggressive prophylactic or preventive treatment, such as a mastectomy, if they had a family history of cancer and genetic testing indicated a genetic predisposition to cancer.”


National Poll Shows Public Divided on Genetic Testing to Predict Cancer Risk

“A national poll from the University of Utah’s Huntsman Cancer Institute shows 34% of respondents would not seek genetic testing to predict their likelihood of developing a hereditary cancer—even if the cost of the testing was not an issue.

“Concerns about employment and insurability were cited as the primary reason, even though current laws prohibit such discrimination.

The poll also shows only 35% percent of respondents would be extremely or very likely to seek aggressive prophylactic or preventive treatment, such as a mastectomy, if they had a family history of cancer and genetic testing indicated a genetic predisposition to cancer.”