Cancer Research Pioneer Works with Apple on Mobile App to Track Breast Cancer Survivors' Experiences

“UCLA cancer research pioneer Dr. Patricia Ganz and collaborators Apple and Sage Bionetworks today announced the launch of Share the Journey: Mind, Body and Wellness after Breast Cancer, a patient-centered mobile app that empowers women to be partners in the research process by tracking their symptoms and successes.

“Available for download today at the iTunes App Store, Share the Journey was developed by UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Penn Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Sage Bionetworks. The app is an interactive research study that aims to understand why some breast cancer survivors recover faster than others, why their symptoms vary over time and what can be done to improve symptoms.

“Ganz, who is director of cancer prevention and control research at the Jonsson Cancer Center, was a key collaborator with Apple and Sage in developing Share the Journey, which marries science and technology by using surveys and sensor data on the iPhone to collect and track fatigue, mood and cognitive changes, sleep disturbances and reductions in exercise.”


Anxiety, Chronic Pain among Problems That Adult Cancer Survivors Experience Years after Treatment, New Study Finds

“A team of researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Central Florida have determined that years after going into remission, many adult cancer survivors still encounter challenges arising from their disease and its treatment.

“From anxiety about a cancer recurrence to physical problems such as chronic pain, survivors aren’t quite done battling the effects of cancer even 2, 5, and 10 years after treatment for the disease.

“The study, ‘Current unmet needs of cancer survivors: Analysis of open-ended responses to the American Cancer Society Study of Cancer Survivors II,’ is published online and in the February issue of Cancer, a journal of the American Cancer Society.

” ‘So often, the expectation is that a cancer survivor should be grateful for having survived a diagnosis of cancer. And while this may be true, those survivors with debilitating, lingering effects of cancer and its treatment are not always acknowledged within healthcare systems as needing continued care based on their cancer survivor status,’ said Gail Adorno, assistant professor in the UT Arlington School of Social Work and co-principal investigator on the study.”


Study Finds Tai Chi Reduces Inflammation in Breast Cancer Survivors

“UCLA researchers have discovered that the Chinese practice of tai chi can reduce inflammation in people who have had breast cancer, thereby reducing a risk factor for the recurrence of the cancer.

“Current research indicates that women diagnosed with breast cancer in the past 10 years are three times more likely to suffer from lack of sleep. Insomnia can lead to increases in inflammation, which places breast cancer survivors at risk for cancer recurrence as well as cardiovascular disease.

“Led by UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center member Dr. Michael Irwin, researchers conducted a five-year randomized clinical trial from April 2007 to August 2013. His team analyzed blood samples from 90 participants between 30 to 85 years old, before and after they started the tai chi routine.

” ‘When people practice tai chi, there is a decrease in the stress hormones produced by the sympathetic nervous system,’ said Irwin, who is professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at UCLA.

“Irwin and his colleagues also discovered that tai chi relaxes the body to a certain point that it can reduce inflammation, which is commonly seen in most breast cancer survivors after treatment.”


Beating Cancer Can Come with New Health Risks

“Completing that final round of chemotherapy and being declared cancer-free is an unquestionable personal health milestone. But it also can mark the start of an uncertain new chapter in a cancer survivor’s life story.

” ‘The leading cause of death in cancer survivors is actually heart disease,’ says Dr. Bruce Liang, director of UConn Health’s Pat and Jim Calhoun Cardiology Center. ‘Patients who have had chemotherapy or radiation are at increased risked for developing heart disease, including heart failure.’ “


Beating Cancer Can Come with New Health Risks

“Completing that final round of chemotherapy and being declared cancer-free is an unquestionable personal health milestone. But it also can mark the start of an uncertain new chapter in a cancer survivor’s life story.

” ‘The leading cause of death in cancer survivors is actually heart disease,’ says Dr. Bruce Liang, director of UConn Health’s Pat and Jim Calhoun Cardiology Center. ‘Patients who have had chemotherapy or radiation are at increased risked for developing heart disease, including heart failure.’ “


Beating Cancer Can Come with New Health Risks

“Completing that final round of chemotherapy and being declared cancer-free is an unquestionable personal health milestone. But it also can mark the start of an uncertain new chapter in a cancer survivor’s life story.

” ‘The leading cause of death in cancer survivors is actually heart disease,’ says Dr. Bruce Liang, director of UConn Health’s Pat and Jim Calhoun Cardiology Center. ‘Patients who have had chemotherapy or radiation are at increased risked for developing heart disease, including heart failure.’ “


Survivorship-Care Programs Pick Up Where Cancer Treatment Leaves Off

Thanks in part to improvements in cancer treatment, the number of cancer survivors is steadily increasing. Even after overcoming cancer, however, survivors still face numerous challenges. The cancer may return, so regular monitoring is needed. In addition, cancer treatments can damage organs or impair attention and memory. Cancer also takes an emotional toll; many cancer survivors experience depression or anxiety. Increasingly, hospitals and nonprofit groups are offering survivorship-care programs that provide treatment follow-up plans, physical rehabilitation, and psychological assistance. The Commission on Cancer, which accredits cancer centers in the U.S., will require these centers to provide survivorship-care plans starting in 2015. Moreover, a congressional committee is currently considering a bill that would require Medicare to cover care-planning services for cancer survivors.


Survivorship-Care Programs Pick Up Where Cancer Treatment Leaves Off

Thanks in part to improvements in cancer treatment, the number of cancer survivors is steadily increasing. Even after overcoming cancer, however, survivors still face numerous challenges. The cancer may return, so regular monitoring is needed. In addition, cancer treatments can damage organs or impair attention and memory. Cancer also takes an emotional toll; many cancer survivors experience depression or anxiety. Increasingly, hospitals and nonprofit groups are offering survivorship-care programs that provide treatment follow-up plans, physical rehabilitation, and psychological assistance. The Commission on Cancer, which accredits cancer centers in the U.S., will require these centers to provide survivorship-care plans starting in 2015. Moreover, a congressional committee is currently considering a bill that would require Medicare to cover care-planning services for cancer survivors.


Survivorship-Care Programs Pick Up Where Cancer Treatment Leaves Off

Thanks in part to improvements in cancer treatment, the number of cancer survivors is steadily increasing. Even after overcoming cancer, however, survivors still face numerous challenges. The cancer may return, so regular monitoring is needed. In addition, cancer treatments can damage organs or impair attention and memory. Cancer also takes an emotional toll; many cancer survivors experience depression or anxiety. Increasingly, hospitals and nonprofit groups are offering survivorship-care programs that provide treatment follow-up plans, physical rehabilitation, and psychological assistance. The Commission on Cancer, which accredits cancer centers in the U.S., will require these centers to provide survivorship-care plans starting in 2015. Moreover, a congressional committee is currently considering a bill that would require Medicare to cover care-planning services for cancer survivors.