Thematic Session 10: Update on treatment options for patients with CRPC

“There are new treatment options for castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) but finding the optimal strategy and selecting the right patient is still fraught with challenges and difficulties, according to uro-oncology experts during a thematic session at the 29th Annual EAU Congress in Stockholm, Sweden.

“ ‘With many prostate cancer patients hoping for a better life without symptoms of the disease, the aim is to identify which new drugs, or a combination of these drugs, can offer prolong survival or effectively palliate bone disease,’ said Prof. Maria De Santis who chaired Thematic Session 10.

“The session focussed on castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which is often considered one of the toughest challenges in uro-oncology since despite repeated treatments the disease accelerates or progresses with severe impact on quality of life (QoL).”

Editor’s note: This article is about an event at a urology conference in Sweden. During the event, participants discussed the latest in prostate cancer treatment, with a focus on castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).


Dendreon Says Prelim. Data from LT Phase II STAND Study Will Be Presented at EAU Congress, Will Show Immune Responses with PROVENGE Enhanced, Sustained

“Dendreon Corporation (NASDAQ: DNDN) today announced the presentation of preliminary data from a long-term analysis of the Phase II STAND study demonstrating that tumor-specific T-cell responses appear to be enhanced and sustained when PROVENGE^® (sipuleucel-T) is given after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with biochemically-recurrent prostate cancer (BRPC) at high risk for metastases. These data will be presented at the 29^th Annual European Association of Urology (EAU) Congress taking place from April 11-15, 2014 in Stockholm, Sweden.”

Editor’s note: This story is about a study that demonstrated positive patient responses when the cancer vaccine Provenge was given as a prostate cancer treatment after patients were first treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The study focused on patients with biochemically-recurrent prostate cancer (BRPC) at high risk for metastasis.


Using a Person's Own Immune System to Fight Cancer: Phase I Clinical Trial of New Immunotherapy Beginning

“Moffitt Cancer Center has initiated a phase I clinical trial for a new immunotherapy drug, ID-G305, made by Immune Design. Immunotherapy is a treatment option that uses a person’s own immune system to fight cancer. It has several advantages over standard cancer therapies, including fewer side effects and an overall better tolerability. It tends to be most effective in patients who have smaller, localized tumors that have not spread to distant sites.”

Editor’s note: This treatment looks for and targets cells that have the protein NY-ESO-1. Only 10-15% of tumors have NY-ESO-1, and patients’ tumors must test positive for NY-ESO-1 in order for the patients to enroll in the trial. Learn more about immunotherapy and clinical trials here.


Using a Person's Own Immune System to Fight Cancer: Phase I Clinical Trial of New Immunotherapy Beginning

“Moffitt Cancer Center has initiated a phase I clinical trial for a new immunotherapy drug, ID-G305, made by Immune Design. Immunotherapy is a treatment option that uses a person’s own immune system to fight cancer. It has several advantages over standard cancer therapies, including fewer side effects and an overall better tolerability. It tends to be most effective in patients who have smaller, localized tumors that have not spread to distant sites.”

Editor’s note: This treatment looks for and targets cells that have the protein NY-ESO-1. Only 10-15% of tumors have NY-ESO-1, and patients’ tumors must test positive for NY-ESO-1 in order for the patients to enroll in the trial. Learn more about immunotherapy and clinical trials here.


Using a Person's Own Immune System to Fight Cancer: Phase I Clinical Trial of New Immunotherapy Beginning

“Moffitt Cancer Center has initiated a phase I clinical trial for a new immunotherapy drug, ID-G305, made by Immune Design. Immunotherapy is a treatment option that uses a person’s own immune system to fight cancer. It has several advantages over standard cancer therapies, including fewer side effects and an overall better tolerability. It tends to be most effective in patients who have smaller, localized tumors that have not spread to distant sites.”

Editor’s note: This treatment looks for and targets cells that have the protein NY-ESO-1. Only 10-15% of tumors have NY-ESO-1, and patients’ tumors must test positive for NY-ESO-1 in order for the patients to enroll in the trial. Learn more about immunotherapy and clinical trials here.


Deploying the Body's Army

“More than a century ago, American bone surgeon William Coley came across the case of Fred Stein, whose aggressive cheek sarcoma had disappeared after he suffered a Streptococcus pyogenesinfection following surgery to remove part of the large tumor. Seven years later, Coley tracked Stein down and found him alive, with no evidence of cancer. Amazed, Coley speculated that the immune response to the bacterial infection had played an integral role in fighting the disease, and the doctor went on to inoculate more than 10 other patients suffering from inoperable tumors with Streptococcus bacteria. Sure enough, several of those who survived the infection—and one who did not—experienced tumor reduction.”

Editor’s note: This article is a great overview of immunotherapy for treating cancer. Immunotherapy drugs boost a patient’s own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more.


Deploying the Body's Army

“More than a century ago, American bone surgeon William Coley came across the case of Fred Stein, whose aggressive cheek sarcoma had disappeared after he suffered a Streptococcus pyogenesinfection following surgery to remove part of the large tumor. Seven years later, Coley tracked Stein down and found him alive, with no evidence of cancer. Amazed, Coley speculated that the immune response to the bacterial infection had played an integral role in fighting the disease, and the doctor went on to inoculate more than 10 other patients suffering from inoperable tumors with Streptococcus bacteria. Sure enough, several of those who survived the infection—and one who did not—experienced tumor reduction.”

Editor’s note: This article is a great overview of immunotherapy for treating cancer. Immunotherapy drugs boost a patient’s own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more.


Deploying the Body's Army

“More than a century ago, American bone surgeon William Coley came across the case of Fred Stein, whose aggressive cheek sarcoma had disappeared after he suffered a Streptococcus pyogenesinfection following surgery to remove part of the large tumor. Seven years later, Coley tracked Stein down and found him alive, with no evidence of cancer. Amazed, Coley speculated that the immune response to the bacterial infection had played an integral role in fighting the disease, and the doctor went on to inoculate more than 10 other patients suffering from inoperable tumors with Streptococcus bacteria. Sure enough, several of those who survived the infection—and one who did not—experienced tumor reduction.”

Editor’s note: This article is a great overview of immunotherapy for treating cancer. Immunotherapy drugs boost a patient’s own immune system to fight cancer. Learn more.


Potential Lung Cancer Vaccine Shows Renewed Promise

“Researchers at UC Davis have found that the investigational cancer vaccine tecemotide, when administered with the chemotherapeutic cisplatin, boosted immune response and reduced the number of tumors in mice with lung cancer. The study also found that radiation treatments did not significantly impair the immune response. The paper was published on March 10 in the journal Cancer Immunology Research, an American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) publication.

“Though tecemotide, also known as Stimuvax, has shown great potential at times, the recent Phase III trial found no overall survival benefit for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, further analysis showed one group of patients, who received concurrent chemotherapy and radiation followed by tecemotide, did benefit from the vaccine. As a result, tecemotide’s manufacturer, Merck KGaA, is sponsoring additional post-clinical animal and human studies, so far with good results.”

Editor’s note: Cancer vaccines are meant to stimulate the immune system to fight cancer. Stimuvax is a cancer vaccine that was found to have no overall survival benefit for patients in a recent clinical trial. But closer analysis of the trial data and the mouse study mentioned above have raised hopes that the vaccine might work with some combination of chemo and radiation treatment.