Scientists Discover Why Combo Treatment Works for People with High-Risk Prostate Cancer


The vast majority of high-risk prostate cancer cases are caused by abnormally high activity of a protein called the androgen receptor. Present in many prostate cells, androgen receptors detect androgen hormones (including testosterone), and in response, turn on or off genes. Genes that are regulated by androgen hormones are critical for the development of the prostate and maintenance of its function. But when the androgen receptor is overly active, which can occur via several different processes in the aging prostate, it can activate genes that can lead to uncontrolled proliferation of prostate cells. This contributes to the development of aggressive prostate cancer. Continue reading…


Differential Androgen Deprivation Therapies with Anti-Androgens of Casodex or MDV3100 vs Anti-Androgen Receptor of ASC-J9 Lead to Promote vs Suppress Prostate Cancer Metastasis

“Despite the fact that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) can effectively reduce prostate tumor size, its effect on prostate cancer (PCa) metastasis remains unclear. We examined the existing data of the ADT treated PCa patients to analyze therapy effects on primary tumors size, prostate specific antigen (PSA) values, and metastatic incidence. We found the current ADT might lead to primary tumors reduction with PSA decreases, yet metastases increase in some PCa patients.”


How Much Hormonal Therapy Is Sufficient?


A recent trial suggests that the standard duration of hormonal therapy is longer than necessary for many patients. In the study, men with localized, but high-risk prostate cancer who were treated with hormonal therapy for 18 months lived just as long as those treated for 36 months. The phase III trial was conducted at multiple hospitals in Quebec, Canada. Dr. Abdenour Nabid of Sherbrooke University Hospital Center in Sherbrooke, Quebec, is lead author of the study. He presented these results last month at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary (ASCO GU) Symposium in Orlando, Florida. Continue reading…