Anti-CDK4/6 Boosts PFS in Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“The addition of a targeted agent to endocrine therapy for metastatic breast cancer led to unprecedented improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) that will have a ‘paradigm changing’ effect on clinical management, an investigator said here.

“Patients who received the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4/6 inhibitor ribociclib in addition to letrozole (Femara) had a 44% reduction in the PFS hazard compared with patients treated with letrozole alone. The median PFS (primary endpoint) was 14.7 months with letrozole but had yet to be reached with letrozole plus ribociclib, ‘but it is expected to far exceed what the control arm did,’ Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, MD, reported at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) conference.”

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Results of Two Practice-Changing Breast Cancer Trials Upheld

Excerpt:

“Results of two pivotal breast cancer trials reported at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting confirmed the practice-changing findings that resulted from earlier findings.

“The phase III PALOMA-2 trial confirmed results from the smaller, open-label phase II PALOMA-1 trial that led to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib (Ibrance). The drug was approved in combination with letrozole for the first-line treatment of metastatic disease.

“ ‘These data represent the longest front-line improvement in median progression-free survival seen to date in women with advanced estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer,’ said Dennis Slamon, MD, Director of Clinical/Translational Research and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, and Director of the Revlon/UCLA Women’s Cancer Research Program.”

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CDK4/6 Inhibitor Shows Promise as Single Agent in HR+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“As a single agent, abemaciclib has shown exciting potential in heavily pretreated patients with refractory, hormone-receptor (HR)–positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer, following phase II findings of the MONARCH 1 trial.

“Results of the single-arm study, which were presented during the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting1, show that the CDK4/6 inhibitor induced a response rate of nearly 20% in this patient population. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6 months (95% CI 4.2-7.5) and the median overall survival (OS) was 17.7 months (95% CI, 16 to not reached). Previously, abemaciclib received a breakthrough therapy designation in this setting from the FDA in October 2015.”

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Palbociclib Addition to Letrozole Improved PFS in ER+/HER2- Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Palbociclib (Ibrance), when added to letrozole, increased the median progression-free survival (PFS) rate in patients with ER-positive, HER2-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer by >10 months, according to results from the phase III PALOMA-2 trial presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting. 

“The risk of disease progressed was reduced by 42 with the addition of palbociclib, a CDK4/6 inhibitor, when compared with letrozole alone. The combination of palbociclib and letrozole was granted an accelerated approval in February 2015, based on the phase II PALOMA-1 study. These results from PALOMA-2 provide confirmation of the combination’s benefits in the frontline setting.

“ ‘These data represent the longest frontline improvement in median PFS seen to date in women with advanced ER+ breast cancer,’ senior study author Dennis J. Slamon, MD, PhD, chief of the Division of Hematology/Oncology in the UCLA Department of Medicine, said when presenting the findings at ASCO.”

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Lilly Announces Results from MONARCH 1 Trial of Abemaciclib Monotherapy

Excerpt:

“Eli Lilly and Company (LLY) today announced results from the MONARCH 1 Phase 2 study of abemaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and CDK 6 inhibitor, in patients with hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) metastatic breast cancer. The data, which were presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting by Maura Dickler, M.D., of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, showed that single-agent activity was observed in metastatic breast cancer patients, for whom endocrine therapy was no longer a suitable treatment option. The MONARCH 1 results (abstract #510) confirmed objective response (ORR), durability of response (DoR), clinical benefit rate (CBR) and progression-free survival (PFS).

“The single-arm study, designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of abemaciclib monotherapy, enrolled 132 patients who were given 200 mg of abemaciclib orally every 12 hours until disease progression. Patients enrolled in the study were heavily pretreated, having experienced progressive disease on or after prior endocrine therapy, and had received prior chemotherapy with one or two chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease. The primary objective of the trial was investigator-assessed ORR, with secondary endpoints of DoR, CBR and PFS.”

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Investigational CDK4/6 Inhibitor Abemaciclib is Active Against a Range of Cancer Types

Excerpt:

“The investigational anticancer therapeutic abemaciclib, which targets CDK4 and CDK6, showed durable clinical activity when given as continuous single-agent therapy to patients with a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer, non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), glioblastoma, and melanoma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

“The results of the trial supported the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decision to grant breakthrough therapy designation to abemaciclib (previously known as LY2835219) for patients with refractory hormone receptor–positive advanced or metastatic breast cancer, according to one of the senior authors of the study, Amita Patnaik, MD, associate director of clinical research at South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics in San Antonio, Texas.”

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FDA Expands Palbociclib Approval for Breast Cancer

“The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted an expanded indication for the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib (Ibrance). The drug is now approved for use in combination with fulvestrant in women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, HER2-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer whose disease progressed following endocrine therapy.

“Palbociclib was initially approved in February 2015 for the treatment of estrogen receptor–positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer, in women who had not yet received endocrine therapy. The new approval was granted under the FDA’s breakthrough therapy designation.

“The additional indication for palbociclib is based on results from the PALOMA-3 trial, which was stopped early in April 2015 after an interim analysis showed benefit in combination with fulvestrant when compared to fulvestrant and placebo.”


Targeted Therapy Combinations Still Key in Metastatic Melanoma

“Combinations of targeted therapies continue to advance toward full regulatory approval for patients with metastatic or unresected melanoma, given the substantial benefits seen with these agents. At this time, the FDA is considering two applications for separate combinations of BRAF and MEK inhibiting agents for patients with unresectable or metastatic BRAFV600 mutation-positive melanoma.

“ ‘The future of the treatment of melanoma is clearly going to be in combinations, both for targeted therapy and for immunotherapy,’ said Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD, who recently joined the NYU Langone Medical Center. ‘Already, there is an FDA-approved combination therapy that is targeted; that is dabrafenib and trametinib. There are new combinations coming up, mainly concerning CDK 4/6 and MEK inhibitors in NRAS-mutated but BRAF wild-type melanoma, which is an unmet medical need.’ “


Lilly Receives FDA Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Abemaciclib – a CDK 4 and 6 Inhibitor – in Advanced Breast Cancer

“Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted Breakthrough Therapy Designation to abemaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 inhibitor, for patients with refractory hormone-receptor-positive (HR+) advanced or metastatic breast cancer. This designation is based on data from the breast cancer cohort expansion of the company’s Phase I trial, JPBA, which studied the efficacy and safety of abemaciclib in women with advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Patients in this cohort had received a median of seven prior systemic treatments. These data were presented at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in 2014.”