War of the Checkpoint Inhibitors: Anti-PD-1 Drugs Move into First-Line Treatment in NSCLC


Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved two anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors, a type of immunotherapy, for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients whose cancer has progressed after first-line treatment with chemotherapy. Now, the manufacturers of both drugs, pembrolizumab (made by Merck) and nivolumab (made by Bristol-Myers Squibb; BMS) are intent on expanding the indications for use of their drugs. To this end, they have conducted clinical trials testing each as a first-line treatment (i.e., in previously untreated patients), comparing them to standard chemotherapy. Continue reading…


Nivolumab/Ipilimumab Frontline Response Nears 60% in PD-L1+ NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Upfront treatment with the combination of nivolumab (Opdivo) and ipilimumab (Yervoy) demonstrated an objective response rate (ORR) of 57% in patients with PD-L1-positive advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to updated pooled findings from the phase Ib CheckMate-012 study presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting.

“In the 3-arm study, patients received nivolumab alone or in combination with ipilimumab every 6 weeks (Q6W) or every 12 weeks (Q12W). Across the full population, which was not selected based on PD-L1 expression, single-agent nivolumab had an ORR of 23%. In the combination arms, the ORRs were 47% and 39%, in the Q12W and Q6W arms, respectively.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


New Cohorts from CheckMate -012 Assess Optimal Dosing of Opdivo+Yervoy in the First-Line Treatment of Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

“Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) today announced updated results from the Opdivo (nivolumab)+Yervoy (ipilimumab) arms in CheckMate -012, a multi-arm Phase 1b trial evaluating Opdivo in patients with chemotherapy-naïve advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, Opdivo was administered as monotherapy or as part of a combination with other agents, including Yervoy, at different doses and schedules. Results from other cohorts in CheckMate -012 have been previously-unreported. These updated results include findings from the administration of four new dosing schedules of Opdivo+Yervoy (n=148), which resulted in confirmed objective response rates (ORR) ranging from 13% to 39% depending on the administered regimen. Median duration of response was not reached in any of these arms with a median follow-up of 6.2 months to 16.6 months, and median progression-free survival (PFS) ranged from 4.9 months to 10.6 months.”