FDA Clears Cold Cap to Save Hair during Breast Cancer Chemo

“Hair loss is one of the most despised side effects of chemotherapy, and now breast cancer patients are getting a new way to save their locks.

“The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday it would allow marketing of the DigniCap to chill patients’ scalps—using a cap connected to a cooling machine—as they receive chemo. A study found it significantly reduced .

“The near-freezing temperature is supposed to reduce blood flow in the scalp, making it harder for cancer-fighting drugs to reach and harm hair follicles.”


Adding Atezolizumab to Chemotherapy Shows Promise in NSCLC

“The anti–PD-L1 agent atezolizumab (MPDL3280A) was recently investigated for safety and efficacy in combination with platinum-based doublet chemotherapy in treatment-naïve patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results from the phase Ib study were presented at the 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting.

“The multiple-arm study looked at MPDL3280A with a different chemotherapy backbone in each arm: carboplatin plus paclitaxel (Arm C; n = 8) carboplatin plus pemetrexed (Arm D; n = 14) or carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel (Arm E; n = 15).

“Across all arms, the overall response rate (ORR) was 67% (48%-82%), with 60% ORR (19%-92%) in Arm C (3 partial responses [PRs]), 75% (45%-93%) in Arm D (9 PRs), and 62% (33%-83%) in Arm E (6 PRs, 2 complete responses).

“Regarding the safety profile, the researchers concluded that the combination regimens were well tolerated. The most frequent all-grade adverse events included those commonly associated with chemotherapy, such as nausea (Arms C and D, 50%; Arm E, 73%), fatigue (Arm C, 38%; Arm D, 36%; Arm E, 73%) and constipation (Arm C, 25%; Arm D, 71%; Arm E, 27%).

“OncLive spoke with Stephen Liu, MD, lead author on the study and assistant professor, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Georgetown University, to better understand the results and purpose of the uniquely designed trial, and how oncologists may need to rethink trial design when investigating similar novel agents.”


AbbVie Initiates Veliparib Phase III Trial in BRCA-mutated Advanced Breast Cancer Patients

“AbbVie has initiated its Phase III trial investigating the safety and efficacy of the investigational PARP inhibitor veliparib in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel in advanced breast cancer patients.

“In the double-blind study, researchers will randomize nearly 300 patients to receive either veliparib, plus the carboplatin/paclitaxel combination, or just the chemotherapy regimen. Metastatic or locally advanced breast cancer patients enrolled in the trial will have to have tumors that are HER2 negative, but positive for BRCA1/2 mutations. AbbVie is working with Myriad Genetics to use its BRACAnalysis test to gauge BRCA mutations in study subjects.

“Researchers will assess in the study whether adding veliparib significantly increases patients’ progression-free survival compared to treatment with only chemotherapy. Other endpoints in the study are overall survival, clinical benefit rate, objective response rate, and duration of response.”

Editor’s note: Clinical trials are research studies that test new treatments on volunteer patients. In many clinical trials, some patients receive the new drug being tested, and for comparison, some patients receive “standard of care” treatment, meaning a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatment that their oncologists would likely have considered for them. This story discusses a new clinical trial that is testing a drug called veliparib. The trial is enrolling people with advanced breast cancer who are HER2 negative and have BRCA1/2 mutations. Some of the patients will be treated with standard chemotherapy (a combination of the drugs carboplatin and paclitaxel), and some will receive veliparib PLUS standard chemotherapy. The trial is randomized, meaning patients will not get to choose which of the two treatments they receive. The goal of the clinical trial is to figure out whether adding veliparib to the chemo improves outcomes for patients.