Many Women With Breast Cancer May Not Need Chemo, but Beware Misleading Headlines

Excerpt:

Findings from a major international clinical trial suggest a significant number of women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer do not need chemotherapy after surgery.

“The results of the so-called TAILORx trial were presented yesterday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology and concurrently published in the New England Journal of Medicine.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Breast Cancer Therapy: All Clear for the Heart

Excerpt:

“Many breast cancer therapies cause damage to the heart. However, in the largest study of its kind so far, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg have now shown that the risk of death from heart disease in breast cancer patients following radiotherapy or chemotherapy is no higher than it is among the average population. Good risk management in the hospitals as well as control screenings at short intervals seem to make up for elevated risks.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Trilaciclib Reduces Chemotherapy-Induced Myelosuppression in Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Trilaciclib appeared associated with reduced chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression and was well tolerated among patients undergoing first-line therapy for extensive-stage small cell lung cancer, according to results from a double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 2 trial.

“Trilaciclib (G1 Therapeutics) is a short-acting CDK4/6 inhibitor that preserves hematopoietic stem cells and enhances immune system function — myelopreservation — during chemotherapy.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Talazoparib Superior to Chemotherapy in BRCA-Associated Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Approximately 5% of patients with sporadic breast cancer harbor mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2; genes that are involved in the DNA repair process. Several phase I/II clinical studies have shown activity of single agent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) and BRCA1/2 mutations. Recently in the randomized phase III OlympiAD trial, the PARP inhibitor olaparib improved progression-free survival (PFS) by 2.8 months over standard chemotherapy in patients with human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)–negative MBC and germline BRCA mutations.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Traditional vs Targeted Chemotherapy in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Traditional neoadjuvant chemotherapy along with dual HER2-targeted blockade yielded significantly better response rates than a novel approach using HER2-targeted chemotherapy plus HER2-targeted blockade, according to a randomized phase III trial.

” ‘Despite the improvements in outcomes associated with HER2-directed therapy, approximately a quarter of patients who receive treatment for their early breast cancer remain at risk of relapse after 8–10 years, and around 15% will die within a decade,’ wrote study authors led by Sara A. Hurvitz, MD, of the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. A need for new strategies in this setting led the investigators to test a neoadjuvant regimen of the antibody–drug conjugate trastuzumab emtansine along with pertuzumab in comparison with traditional systemic chemotherapy along with trastuzumab plus pertuzumab.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Atezolizumab plus Bevacizumab and Chemotherapy Extends PFS in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“The addition of atezolizumab to first-line treatment with bevacizumab and chemotherapy significantly prolonged PFS among individuals with advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer, according to the agent’s manufacturer.

Atezolizumab (Tecentriq, Genentech) is a monoclonal antibody designed to bind with PD-L1.

“The randomized, multicenter, open-label phase 3 IMpower150 study assessed the efficacy and safety of atezolizumab in combination of chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab (Avastin, Genentech) for patients with stage IV nonsquamous NSCLC who had not undergone chemotherapy for their advanced disease.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Bevacizumab Does Not Improve Outcomes With Chemotherapy in Early NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The addition of bevacizumab to adjuvant chemotherapy failed to improve survival outcomes in patients with surgically resected early-stage non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a new randomized trial. The agent “does not have a role” in this setting, the investigators concluded.

” ‘In the setting of advanced-stage NSCLC, the first agent to improve survival when added to a platinum doublet was bevacizumab,’ wrote authors led by Heather A. Wakelee, MD, of the Stanford Cancer Institute at Stanford University in California. The researchers tested whether the VEGF-targeted agent would be similarly effective in the early-stage NSCLC adjuvant setting, where patients remain at high risk of relapse despite chemotherapy.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Chemotherapy Drug Maintains Quality of Life Despite Side Effects

Excerpt:

“Patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) reported similar health-related quality of life (HRQOL) during treatment with a recently approved chemotherapy drug as compared to patients receiving a placebo treatment, according to a clinical trial published in Lancet Oncology.

“These findings, in conjunction with previous research showing delayed disease progression, suggest the drug, called everolimus, may be able to preserve quality of life even in light of chemotherapy’s often-toxic side effects. The findings support the usefulness of HRQOL as an endpoint in clinical trials studying NETs, in a secondary analysis of their findings, according to the study.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Brain Cancer Survival Improves with Novel Electrical Device, Data Suggest

Excerpt:

“A wearable medical device that delivers electrical fields through the scalp helped to extend the survival of patients with lethal brain tumors, according to data presented Sunday.

“In a study involving major medical centers in the United States and abroad, the novel treatment was used to administer alternating, low-intensity ‘tumor-treating fields’ to newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients who also were getting chemotherapy. Such electrical fields may block the division of cancer cells and cause their demise, according to Roger Stupp, the study’s lead investigator and a neuro-oncologist at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.