Anthracyclines Negatively Impact Brain Function

“Cancer survivors treated with anthracycline-based chemotherapies exhibited poorer performance of certain cognitive skills compared with survivors who received no chemotherapy or other classes of chemotherapies, according to the results of a study published in JAMA Oncology.

“While the study of 62 primary breast cancer survivors is retrospective and small, the results suggest that further studies are needed to understand how the neurologic effects of anthracycline-based chemotherapy agents may be minimized.

“Shelli R. Kesler, PhD, of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and Douglas W. Blayney, MD, of the Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, California, analyzed both cognitive function and resting state functional magnetic resonance brain imaging data from breast cancer survivors who were treated, on average, 2.1 years prior to undergoing the assessments. The patients were all assessed at Stanford University.”


Big Changes Coming in Treatment of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

“The treatment paradigm for patients with triple-negative breast cancer is set to undergo a dramatic transformation, as standard chemotherapeutic approaches are perfected and novel antibody-drug conjugates are developed.

“The treatment paradigm for patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is set to undergo a dramatic transformation, as standard chemotherapeutic approaches are perfected and novel antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are developed. Kimberly Blackwell addressed this topic at the 2015 Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium, a meeting of over 1,000 oncologists and oncology professionals in New York City in November.

“ ‘I think we will see significant improvements in triple-negative breast cancer within the next few years,’ said Blackwell, an oncologist at the Duke Cancer Institute. ‘There are two ADCs that I am fairly excited about that are in late stage development.’ “


Super Patient: Lyndsay Sung Catches Her Breast Cancer Just In Time


In 2013, Lyndsay Sung noticed something new on the edge of her right breast. “I felt something weird—an odd thickening along the rib,” she recalls. At the time, her son was only a year old, so she thought it might have been related to breastfeeding. But then she felt it again in September 2014. Lyndsay knew she was at risk for breast cancer because her grandmother had had it, and she also knew her breasts from years of self-exams. So she went to see her family doctor. Continue reading…


ADT Plus Chemo Ideal for Oligometastatic Prostate Cancer

“Oligometastatic prostate cancer is optimally treated with the combination of docetaxel and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), according to a presentation at the 7th European Multidisciplinary Meeting on Urological Cancers (EMUC).

“ ‘Oligometastatic disease is a transit state of prostate cancer and is an imaging technique-dependent definition,’ Bertrand Tombal MD, PhD, Chairman of the Division of Urology, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium, explained at the conference. ‘Nevertheless, it is unlikely that metastases targeted treatment will be enough to control the disease.’ “


Checkpoint Inhibitors Show Promise in SCLC, Mesothelioma

“Immune checkpoint inhibitors have demonstrated encouraging results for patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and mesothelioma, two aggressive thoracic malignancies with few options, according to a presentation by M. Catherine Pietanza, MD, at the 10th Annual New York Lung Cancer Symposium.

“ ‘The antibodies to CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1 can be safely given to these patients. Responses are seen and are durable. There is a benefit in both platinum-sensitive and platinum-refractory SCLC,’ said Pietanza, a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

“Chemotherapy has traditionally been the treatment of choice for most patients with SCLC and mesothelioma beyond the frontline setting. However, outcomes are poor with these therapies, specifically for SCLC, where the median survival following second-line therapy ranges from 6 to 9 months.”


Higher Insulin Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Advanced Breast Cancer

“Patients with breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastasised) and who have higher insulin levels than normal, but are not diabetic, have a significantly worse prognosis compared with those with normal insulin levels, a researcher will tell the Advanced Breast Cancer Third International Consensus Conference tomorrow.

“Although the effect of higher insulin levels is already known in early breast cancer patients, it is the first time that insulin resistance, where the body’s inefficient use of insulin leads to the production of an excess, has been shown to lead to a worse outcome for metastatic breast cancer patients.

“Dr Nicoletta Provinciali, MD, an oncologist from the E.O. Ospedali Galliera, Genoa, Italy, will describe to the conference her team’s study, which involved 125 metastatic breast cancer patients. In addition to not being diabetic, all those involved had HER2 negative tumours and were receiving chemotherapy on its own (first line chemotherapy) as part of a clinical trial. The researchers assessed the relationship between insulin resistance and the length of time the patient lived without the disease getting worse (progression-free survival, or PFS) and overall survival (OS), the length of time that the patient remained alive.”


ASCO Updates Guidelines for Antiemetics During Chemo

“For patients receiving chemotherapy, the use of the oral combination of netupitant (a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist) and palonosetron (a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor antagonist) is beneficial for prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting, according to a focused guideline update published online Nov. 2 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“Paul J. Hesketh, M.D., from the Lahey Hospital and Medical Center in Burlington, Mass., and colleagues conducted a targeted systematic literature review to update guidelines on use of the oral combination of netupitant and palonosetron for prevention of acute and delayed nausea and vomiting among patients receiving chemotherapy.”


New Study Could Save Breast Cancer Patients Time, Money and Side Effects

“Most breast cancer patients with invasive lobular carcinoma could be treated with hormones alone and not with chemotherapy, according to a study by Virginia Piper Cancer Institute at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, part of Allina Health.

“Researchers reviewed all consecutive cases of invasive lobular carcinoma  diagnosed at the Allina Health Laboratory from the past eight years. Included were 158 patients with invasive lobular carcinoma breast cancer who also had molecular testing with the Oncotype DX gene expression test.

“With Allina Health pathologists, researchers defined a model that included characteristics of a tumor most predictive of the recurrence risk identified on the Oncotype DX gene expression test: progesterone receptor expression, Ki-67 (proliferation index), estrogen receptor expression, patient age and tumor size.”


CRT May Be Preferred Strategy for Elderly with Lung Cancer

“Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is associated with survival benefit over chemotherapy (CT) alone for elderly patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“Christopher D. Corso, M.D., Ph.D., from the Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn., and colleagues examined outcomes for elderly patients (≥70 years) treated with CT versus CRT. Data were included for 8,637 patients with limited-stage small-cell lung  in the National Cancer Data Base between 2003 and 2011.

“The researchers found that 43.7 and 56.3 percent of the patients received CT and CRT, respectively. CRT receipt was less likely with increasing age, clinical stage III disease, female sex, and the presence of medical comorbidities (all P < 0.01). Compared with CT, CRT use correlated with increased overall survival on univariate and multivariate analysis (median overall survival, 15.6 versus 9.3 months). Survival benefit associated with CRT was confirmed in a propensity score-matched cohort of 6,856 patients (hazard ratio, 0.52; P < 0.001). In subset analysis, patients who were alive at four months after diagnosis had a  with concurrent versus sequential CRT (median overall survival, 17.0 versus 15.4 months; log-rank P = 0.01).”