New ASTRO Guidelines Recommend Hypofractionated Breast Irradiation

Excerpt:

“An expert panel convened by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) released a set of recommendations regarding fractionation for whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in women with breast cancer. The guideline includes recommendations for standard practice, factors that should influence fractionation decision making, and issues surrounding tumor bed boost, among other issues.

” ‘Breast cancer is the most common malignancy treated with radiation therapy in the United States, and WBI is the most common radiotherapeutic approach for breast cancer,’ wrote authors led by Benjamin D. Smith, MD, of MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. The standard of care for WBI has involved conventional fractionation (CF), with daily doses of 180 to 200 cGy up to approximately 4,500 to 5,000 cGy; research in the 1990s and 2000s looked into whether moderate hypofractionation (HF) with daily doses of 265 to 330 cGy could offer similar outcomes.”

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NCCN Guidelines Recommend Optune in Combination with Temozolomide as a Category 1 Treatment for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“NovoCure (NASDAQ: NVCR) announced today that the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has updated its clinical practice guidelines to recommend Optune® in combination with temozolomide as a category 1 treatment for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) in its globally recognized Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Central Nervous System Cancers.

“NCCN panel members designated alternating electric field therapy, or Optune, as a Category 1 treatment recommendation for patients with newly diagnosed GBM in conjunction with temozolomide after maximal safe resection and completion of radiation therapy in patients with newly diagnosed GBM.”

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Accelerated WBI Should be the Norm for Most Breast Cancers

Excerpt:

“Most women with breast cancer should receive accelerated whole-breast irradiation (WBI) as the standard of care, according to a new guideline from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

“Accelerated, or hypofractionated, WBI is the preferred form of radiotherapy for breast cancer, regardless of a patient’s age, tumor stage, or whether the patient has received chemotherapy. The guideline replaces an ASTRO guideline published in 2011, which recommended hypofractionated WBI for selected patients: primarily older patients and those with less advanced disease.”

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GenomeDx Announces Inclusion of Decipher Genomic Testing in NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“GenomeDx Biosciences, a leader in the field of urologic cancer genomics, today announced that its Decipher® Prostate Biopsy and Decipher Prostate RP molecular assays for prostate cancer are now included in the 2018 National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN) Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology [Version 1.2018].

“The NCCN Guidelines are the recognized clinical standard for cancer care, and are developed and revised by a panel of expert physicians from 27 leading U.S. cancer centers. The panel revises recommended practice guidelines according to current evidence and advances in cancer care.”

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Ramalingam Shares Notable Updates in NCCN Guidelines for EGFR+ NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Among the notable updates in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network’s (NCCN) recently released  treatment guidelines for non–small cell cancer (NSCLC) is the category 2A recommendation to give osimertinib (Tagrisso), a third-generation irreversible EGFR inhibitor designed to inhibit both EGFR-sensitizing and EGFR T790M-resistance mutations, in the first-line setting for patients whose disease is EGFR mutant, explains Suresh A. Ramalingam, MD.

“Osimertinib was also given a category 1 recommendation as a subsequent therapy after patients progressed on treatment with standard EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib (Tarceva), gefitinib (Iressa), and afatinib (Gilotrif). The FDA granted a breakthrough therapy designation to a supplemental biologics license application for osimertinib as a frontline treatment for patients with metastatic EGFR-mutation–positive NSCLC in October 2017. The application was based on findings from the double-blind, phase III FLAURA trial, in which frontline osimertinib was associated with a 54% reduction in the risk of progression or death compared with standard therapy.”

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Guideline on Stage IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Therapy Updated

Excerpt:

“An update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) clinical practice guideline clarifies the role of immunotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The update also provides new recommendations on the use of targeted therapies for patients with changes in tumor EGFRALK, and ROS1 genes.

” ‘Treatment for lung cancer has become increasingly more complex over the last several years. This guideline update provides oncologists the tools to choose therapies that are most likely to benefit their patients,’ said Nasser Hanna, MD, co-chair of the Expert Panel that developed the guideline update.”

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New Guidelines Aim Treat Brain Tumors More Effectively

Excerpt:

“A University of Portsmouth academic has helped to develop European guidelines to treat brain tumours more effectively.

“Geoff Pilkington, Professor of Cellular and Molecular Neuro-oncology and one of the UK’s leading brain tumour specialists, was one of only three UK academics who devised the European Association for Neuro-Oncology (EANO) guidelines on the diagnosis and  of  with astrocytic and oligodendroglial gliomas, including glioblastomas.”

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Updates to NSCLC Guidelines Make Testing at Diagnosis, Resistance Essential

Excerpt:

“Updates to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for the management of advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stress the importance of multiplexed biomarker testing at diagnosis to aid in the selection of appropriate first-line and subsequent lines of therapy, said presenters at the 2017 NCCN Annual Conference.

“The latest version of the guidelines recommends that PD-L1, in addition to molecular analysis, be employed as a biomarker to direct initial therapy, with ≥50% expression established as the threshold for a positive result. The PD-L1 test ‘decides whether a patient has enough of the marker to warrant initial immunotherapy,’ said presenter Gregory J. Riely, MD, PhD.”

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NCCN Publishes Patient Education Resources for Gliomas—Its First in a Series on Brain Cancer

Excerpt:

“January 9, 2017) The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®) has published the NCCN Guidelines for Patients® and NCCN Quick Guide™ sheets for Brain Cancer – Gliomas—the first in a series of patient education resources focused on Brain Cancer. Published by NCCN through support of the NCCN Foundation®, and, in part through funding from NCCN Foundation’s Team Pound the Pavement for Patients, these resources inform patients about their disease and the treatment options available to them.”

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