Novartis Revolutionizes Clinical Trials for Targeted Cancer Drugs


Someone had to do it; now it looks like Novartis may be the first. The pharma company’s new series of clinical trials, SIGNATURE (also known as, ‘bring the protocol to the patient,’ or  ‘P2P’), is recruiting patients with different cancers to receive investigational targeted drugs selected to match the distinct genetic changes found in each patient’s tumor. Continue reading…


Not Enough Cancer Patients Enroll in Clinical Trials

Around 10% of mid- and late-stage clinical trials of cancer treatments end prematurely because not enough patients enroll, a recent analysis shows. This lack of participants slows the development of new cancer medications and wastes considerable amounts of money invested in these trials. The authors of the analysis hope to focus attention on possible reasons why too few patients enroll in clinical trials. Doctors may not always encourage their patients enough to participate, and some insurance plans do not cover the costs associated with clinical trials. Patients may also hesitate because they fear receiving only a placebo instead of treatment. However, in modern clinical trials, new cancer drugs are tested against the current standard therapy, so that all participants receive treatment.


Not Enough Cancer Patients Enroll in Clinical Trials

Around 10% of mid- and late-stage clinical trials of cancer treatments end prematurely because not enough patients enroll, a recent analysis shows. This lack of participants slows the development of new cancer medications and wastes considerable amounts of money invested in these trials. The authors of the analysis hope to focus attention on possible reasons why too few patients enroll in clinical trials. Doctors may not always encourage their patients enough to participate, and some insurance plans do not cover the costs associated with clinical trials. Patients may also hesitate because they fear receiving only a placebo instead of treatment. However, in modern clinical trials, new cancer drugs are tested against the current standard therapy, so that all participants receive treatment.


Not Enough Cancer Patients Enroll in Clinical Trials

Around 10% of mid- and late-stage clinical trials of cancer treatments end prematurely because not enough patients enroll, a recent analysis shows. This lack of participants slows the development of new cancer medications and wastes considerable amounts of money invested in these trials. The authors of the analysis hope to focus attention on possible reasons why too few patients enroll in clinical trials. Doctors may not always encourage their patients enough to participate, and some insurance plans do not cover the costs associated with clinical trials. Patients may also hesitate because they fear receiving only a placebo instead of treatment. However, in modern clinical trials, new cancer drugs are tested against the current standard therapy, so that all participants receive treatment.


New Melanoma Combo Treatment Is Promising in Early Trial

Because melanomas can quickly resist BRAF inhibitor drugs alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors, researchers are testing a new combination treatment: the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib and PX-866, which inhibits a cancer pathway called PI3K. In a phase I/II clinical trial of 19 people with melanomas that have BRAF mutations, the vemurafenib/PX-866 combination shrank tumors in 10 of them. These findings were presented at the 10th International Congress of the Society for Melanoma Research in Philadelphia. However, while results so far are encouraging, it will take larger trials to see if this new combo treatment really overcomes drug resistance in melanomas. This ongoing trial is still accepting new participants.


New Melanoma Immunotherapy Advances in Early Trials

On the strength of a promising phase I clinical trial, evaluations are continuing for an experimental immunotherapy that targets and selectively kills melanoma cells. Called IMCgp100, the drug has two parts that are fused together. One part is an immune system protein that has been engineered to recognize a protein called gp100, which is on the surface of melanoma cells. The other part of the new drug is a protein fragment that boosts the immune response against the tumor. The phase II trial of IMCgp100 is currently recruiting new participants.


Experts Suggest Ways to Increase Cancer Patient Participation in Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are the cornerstone of developing better cancer care. However, less than 5% of cancer patients participate in clinical trials. A recent meeting of cancer experts developed a list of recommendations for increasing clinical trial enrollment. Strategies at the patient and community level include involving patient advocates and community leaders in clinical trial recruitment, simplifying patient consent forms, and providing interpreters. At the physician level, electronic registries may help keep doctors informed about the availability of clinical trials for their patients. Doctors must also work on speaking to their patients about clinical trials in culturally sensitive ways. Finally, at the level of organizations that initiate clinical trials, institutions need to become more efficient about opening and conducting trials.


Experts Suggest Ways to Increase Cancer Patient Participation in Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are the cornerstone of developing better cancer care. However, less than 5% of cancer patients participate in clinical trials. A recent meeting of cancer experts developed a list of recommendations for increasing clinical trial enrollment. Strategies at the patient and community level include involving patient advocates and community leaders in clinical trial recruitment, simplifying patient consent forms, and providing interpreters. At the physician level, electronic registries may help keep doctors informed about the availability of clinical trials for their patients. Doctors must also work on speaking to their patients about clinical trials in culturally sensitive ways. Finally, at the level of organizations that initiate clinical trials, institutions need to become more efficient about opening and conducting trials.


Experts Suggest Ways to Increase Cancer Patient Participation in Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are the cornerstone of developing better cancer care. However, less than 5% of cancer patients participate in clinical trials. A recent meeting of cancer experts developed a list of recommendations for increasing clinical trial enrollment. Strategies at the patient and community level include involving patient advocates and community leaders in clinical trial recruitment, simplifying patient consent forms, and providing interpreters. At the physician level, electronic registries may help keep doctors informed about the availability of clinical trials for their patients. Doctors must also work on speaking to their patients about clinical trials in culturally sensitive ways. Finally, at the level of organizations that initiate clinical trials, institutions need to become more efficient about opening and conducting trials.