First-Line Atezolizumab Plus Chemotherapy Improves PFS for Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“The addition of frontline atezolizumab to carboplatin or cisplatin plus pemetrexed improved PFS among patients with non-small cell lung cancer, according to interim results from a global phase 3 randomized trial presented at International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer’s World Conference on Lung Cancer.

“IMpower132 is an open-label study of atezolizumab (Tecentriq, Genentech) — a PD-L1 inhibitor — among 578 chemotherapy-naive patients with stage IV nonsquamous NSCLC. Exclusion criteria included EGFR or ALK mutations, untreated central nervous system metastases, autoimmune disease and prior exposure to immunotherapy.”

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Brigatinib Superior to Standard of Care Crizotinib in ALK+ NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Adult patients with ALK-positive, locally advanced or metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had not received a prior ALK inhibitor experienced a more than 50% reduction in the risk of disease progression or death with treatment with brigatinib (Alunbrig), compared with the first-line standard of care, crizotinib.

“Brigatinib demonstrated superior progression-free survival (PFS) compared with crizotinib, corresponding to a 51% reduction in the risk of disease progression or death (HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.33-74; P = .0007), according to first interim analysis results presented at the 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer and simultaneously published in the New England Journal of Medicine.”

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MONALEESA-3 Data Highlight Ribociclib as Standard in HR+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Findings from the MONALEESA-3 trial dispelled the theory that a CDK4/6 inhibitor had to be reserved following recurrence on hormone therapy in postmenopausal patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, HER2-negative breast cancer, explained Dennis J. Slamon, MD, PhD.

“In the phase III trial, postmenopausal patients with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced disease who received up to 1 prior line of therapy were randomized 2:1 to ribociclib (Kisqali) plus fulvestrant (Faslodex) or placebo.”

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Apalutamide Maintains Health-Related QoL in Nonmetastatic CRPC

Excerpt:

“Treatment with apalutamide (Erleada) was not associated with a significant impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with high-risk nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, according to patient-reported outcome (PRO) data from the phase III SPARTAN trial.

“In the study overall, patients treated with the addition of apalutamide to standard hormone therapy also had an improvement in metastasis-free survival (MFS) and longer time to symptomatic progression compared with those who were treated with placebo.”

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Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Shows Promise for Glioblastomas

Excerpt:

“Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) appears to be safe and effective for glioblastomas in select patients and may add an average of 2 months to life expectancy compared with the current standard of care, according to a new report published in the journal Neurosurgery.

” ‘We showed that the procedure is well tolerated and that recurrent patients had a meaningful clinical benefit that seems to be better when compared with previously published data on the current standard of care,’ said Eric Leuthardt, MD, senior study author and a professor of neurosurgery, neuroscience, biomedical engineering, and mechanical engineering & applied science at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri.”

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Overall Survival Improved With Encorafenib/Binimetinib Combination in BRAF-Mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

In patients with advanced BRAF V600–mutant melanoma, combining the BRAF inhibitor encorafenib (Braftovi) with the MEK inhibitor binimetinib (Mektovi) improved overall survival compared to vemurafenib (Zelboraf) or encorafenib as monotherapy, with a favorable toxicity profile, according to updated results from the phase III COLUMBUS trial.

“Combined BRAF/MEK inhibitor therapy is standard of care in advanced BRAF V600–mutant melanoma, but approved combinations have unique toxicities that may impact the ability to deliver optimal treatment (ie, vemurafenib/cobimetinib [Cotellic] is associated with photosensitivity).”

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Alpelisib Improves PFS for Advanced PIK3CA-Mutated Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“A trial assessing the alpha-specific PI3K inhibitor alpelisib with fulvestrant met its primary endpoint of PFS among patients with hormone receptor-positive, HER-2-negative advanced breast cancer with a PIK3CA mutation, according to the agent’s manufacturer.

“Alpelisib (BYL719, Novartis) is an inhibitor of the PI3K pathway. About 40% of patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer harbor PIK3CA mutations.

“The phase 3 global, double-blind SOLAR-1 study included 572 women and men with PIK3CA-mutated hormone receptor-positive, HER-2-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer that progressed on or following prior aromatase inhibitor treatment with or without a CDK4/6 inhibitor.”

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PARP Inhibitor Talazoparib Benefit in BCRA+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“The now-published results from the EMBRACA study confirm that  talazoparib (Pfizer), a poly-adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitor,  prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with advanced BCRA-positive breast cancer compared with single-agent chemotherapy alone, and that it also significantly improves quality of life.

” ‘This is the largest randomized trial in BRCA mutation carriers [ever undertaken] and demonstrates PARP efficacy,’ Jennifer Litton, MD, associate professor in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, told Medscape Medical News in an email.”

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Bevacizumab and Temozolomide in First Recurrence of Glioma Without 1p/19q Codeletion

Excerpt:

“In a phase II trial funded by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer and reported in The Lancet Oncology, van den Bent et al found no evidence of a survival benefit with the addition of bevacizumab (Avastin) to temozolomide in patients with a first recurrence of World Health Organization grade II or III glioma without the 1p/19q codeletion.

“In the open-label trial, conducted at 32 European centers, 155 patients were randomized between February 2011 and July 2015 to receive either temozolomide at 150 to 200 mg/m² on days 1 to 5 every 4 weeks for a maximum of 12 cycles (n = 77) or the same temozolomide regimen plus bevacizumab at 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks until disease progression (n = 78). Previous chemotherapy must have been stopped at least 6 months before enrollment, and radiotherapy, at least 3 months before enrollment. Overall, 44% of patients in the combination group and 47% in the temozolomide group had grade III disease.”

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