Niraparib/Pembrolizumab Combo Active in Relapsed, Progressive TNBC

Excerpt:

“Half of patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) achieved disease control when treated with the combination of a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor and an anti–PD-1 agent, a preliminary prospective study showed.

“Overall, 13 of 46 evaluable patients had objective responses to treatment with niraparib (Zejula) and pembrolizumab (Keytruda). An additional 10 patients had stable disease. Clinical activity was observed in patients beyond those with germline BRCA mutations.”

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Adding Bevacizumab to Erlotinib Prolongs PFS in EGFR-Mutated NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The combination of bevacizumab (Avastin) and erlotinib (Tarceva) is superior to erlotinib alone as upfront treatment for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR mutations. A preplanned interim analysis of the phase III study known as NEJ026 showed a median progression-free survival (PFS) by independent review (the primary endpoint) of 16.9 months with the bevacizumab/erlotinib combination compared with 13.3 months with erlotinib by itself, said Naoki Furuya, MD, PhD, at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting.”

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Adding Abemaciclib Offers Good Outcomes in Pre-/Perimenopausal Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“The addition of the CDK4/6 inhibitor abemaciclib to fulvestrant significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) and time to subsequent chemotherapy in pre- and perimenopausal women with hormone receptor–positive/HER2-negative advanced breast cancer, according to results from an analysis of the phase III MONARCH-2 trial (abstract 1002) presented at the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, held June 1–5 in Chicago.”

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AZ, MSD’s Lynparza/Abiraterone Combo Hits Prostate Cancer Goals

Excerpt:

“AstraZeneca and MSD have presented data at ASCO showing improvement in radiologic progression-free survival (rPFS) in prostate cancer patients taking a combination of Lynparza and abiraterone.

“Study 08 – a randomised, double-blinded, multi-centre Phase II trial – compared Lynparza (olaparib) in combination with abiraterone to abiraterone alone in patients with previously-treated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, (mCRPC), regardless of homologous recombination repair (HRR) mutation status.”

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Immunotherapy Could Stop Prostate Cancer Spreading, Trial Shows

Excerpt:

“Men with otherwise untreatable prostate cancer could halt its spread and survive longer by undergoing immunotherapy treatment, a trial has shown.

“More than a third of men with an advanced form of the cancer were still alive and one-in-10 had not had further growth after a year on the drug pembrolizumab, the study found.

“It is the first time immunotherapy has been shown to benefit some men with prostate cancer, the researchers said.”

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New Approach to Treating Glioblastoma Could Add Years to Patients’ Lives

Excerpt:

A new way of treating glioblastoma — the deadly brain tumor currently ailing Arizona Sen. John McCain — with a personalized vaccine is giving some patients in a clinical trial more time.

“The vaccination, called DCVax-L, is made out of a patient’s own cells and uses them to jumpstart the immune system and attack the tumor. In the trial, some patients survived for more than 36 months — more than a year and a half longer than current life expectancy after glioblastoma diagnosis.”

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Nivolumab Shows Durable Benefit for Advanced Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Patients with surgically resected stage III or stage IV melanoma at high risk for recurrence maintained longer RFS after adjuvant treatment with nivolumab then standard ipilimumab, according to long-term efficacy results from the CheckMate 238 clinical trial presented at ASCO Annual Meeting.

“‘These more mature data continue to demonstrate durable clinical benefit with nivolumab and further support its use for resected stage III or IV melanoma,’ Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD, deputy director of Perlmutter Cancer Center at NYU Langone Health, said during his presentation.”

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No Survival Bump With More Frequent PSA Screens for Localized Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Undergoing more frequent prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening after radical prostatectomy or primary radiation for localized prostate cancer was not associated with improved overall survival (OS), regardless of disease risk, according to results of the AFT-30 study (abstract 6503) presented at the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, held June 1–5 in Chicago.

“‘Based on our study results, PSA testing every 3 to 6 months may represent overutilization of care,’ said Ronald Chen, MD, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ‘This study provides empiric data to inform future guidelines and clinical practice.'”

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First Study of Neoadjuvant Use of PARP Inhibitor Shows Promise for Early-Stage, BRCA+ Breast Cancer Patients

Excerpt:

In a small Phase II study of early-stage breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found that more than half of the women who took the PARP inhibitor talazoparib once daily prior to surgery had no evidence of disease at the time of surgery. If further validated in larger, confirmatory trials, the oral medication could replace chemotherapy for these patients.

“The trial, which expands upon a feasibility study published in npj Breast Cancer, was presented today as an oral presentation at the 2018 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting by Jennifer Litton, M.D., associate professor of Breast Medical Oncology.”

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