Good Outcomes with Cabozantinib in Carcinoid, PNET Tumors

Excerpt:

“Treatment with cabozantinib was tied to objective tumor responses and promising progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with advanced carcinoid and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET), researchers reported here.

“With a daily cabozantinib (Cabometyx, Cometriq) treatment, 15% of 20 patients with pNET achieved partial response (95% CI 5-36%) and 75% achieved stable disease (95% CI 53-89%), which was the the trial’s primary endpoint, according to Jennifer Chan, MD, MPH, of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues.”

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Cabozantinib Elicits Responses in Neuroendocrine and Carcinoid Tumors

Excerpt:

“In a phase II study reported at the 2017 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor cabozantinib (Cometriq) was evaluated in advanced carcinoid and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Radiographic responses to therapy were observed in both tumor subtypes, and compared to other drugs historically used in this setting, progression-free survival data were encouraging, according to Jennifer A. Chan, MD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston.

“Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway inhibitors have shown activity in advanced neuroendocrine tumors. Recent studies have suggested that activation of the MET signaling pathway may also play a role in the growth of neuroendocrine tumors. Increased expression of MET correlates with decreased overall survival in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, Dr. Chan noted.”

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Future of Exelixis Cancer Drug Dims Further With Second Failed Prostate Cancer Study

The gist: A drug called cabozantinib doesn’t do any better than a steroid treatment when it comes to relieving bone pain in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. That was the conclusion of a recent clinical trial that tested the drug in volunteer patients. The trial enrolled men who were suffering from moderate to severe pain despite optimized narcotic medication, and whose cancer had worsened after treatment with docetaxel as well as abiraterone and/or enzalutamide. Some of the men in the trial were treated with cabozantinib, and some with the steroid treatment mitoxantrone/prednisone.

“Exelixis (EXEL) announced Monday that treatment with cabozantinib failed to alleviate bone pain compared to a steroid control in men with advanced, metastatic prostate cancer. A negative outcome from the so-called COMET-2 prostate cancer study of cabozantinib was widely expected given the previously announced failure of the COMET-1 study in September. Still, Exelixis shares fell another 10% to $1.49 — an all-time low — on heightened concerns that ongoing cabozantinib studies in kidney and liver cancer may also prove disappointing.

“A few years ago, there was much optimism for cabozantinib based on phase II data showing the drug cleared bone lesions and reduced pain in advanced prostate cancer patients. Cancer that metastasizes, or spreads, to bones is a serious complication leading to fractures, increased pain and eventual death. While many cancer drugs can shrink or eliminate tumors in soft tissue, few if any had ever demonstrated an ability to clear up bone metastases.

“All too often, promising results from phase II studies don’t pan out when larger, confirmatory phase III studies are conducted. That’s exactly what happened to Exelixis. In the COMET-2 study, 15% of prostate cancer patients with moderate to severe bone pain despite use of narcotics responded to treatment with cabozantinib compared to 17% of patients treated with steroids. Clearly, this is not the results Exelixis had in mind three years ago when reporting on the phase II bone lesion/bone pain data in the phase II study.”


New Drug May Be Effective for Lung Cancer Patients with RET Mutations

Some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have tumor mutations called “RET fusions.” RET fusions are especially common in patients who have adenocarcinoma, never smoked, and/or have no mutations in other genes commonly associated with NSCLC. In an ongoing phase II clinical trial, three patients with adenocarcinoma and RET fusions appeared to respond well to the drug cabozantinib (Cometriq). The tumors of two of the patients shrank during Cometriq treatment, while the third experienced stable disease. Further studies are needed, but these results suggest that Cometriq may be an effective treatment for NSCLC patients with RET fusions.

Research paper: http://cancerdiscovery.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2013/03/23/2159-8290.CD-13-0035.abstract


Avastin-Containing Chemotherapy May Be Safe in Lung Cancer Patients with Brain Metastases

Bevacizumab (Avastin), which is approved for treatment of a number of advanced-stage cancer types, is commonly avoided in patients with brain metastases (cancer that has spread to the brain) because of fear of brain hemorrhages (bleeding in the brain). A retrospective study of 52 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had received chemotherapy containing Avastin found no cases of serious bleeding events and no significant differences in survival or treatment side effects between patients with or without brain metastases. Avastin may therefore be a safe treatment option in NSCLC with brain metastases.

Research paper: https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/acrt/20/2/20_47/_pdf


Overexpression of IGF1R and EGFR Genes May Worsen Lung Cancer Prognosis

The roles of the genes IGF1R and EGFR in lung cancer were examined in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had their primary tumor surgically removed. Patients whose tumors had increased expression of both IGFR1R and EGFR were more likely to experience recurrence of the cancer after a shorter amount of time and had shorter survival times after surgery. This finding suggests that concurrent overexpression of IGF1R and EGFR is a negative prognosis factor in NSCLC and may indicate patients who are more likely to benefit from novel treatments with IGF1R inhibitors.

Research paper: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00280-012-2056-y/fulltext.html


Study Suggests Iressa Effective for Elderly Patients with EGFR-Mutant Lung Cancer

A retrospective study in Japan examined 55 patients aged 75 years or over with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had a mutation in the EGFR gene and received gefitinib (Iressa) as first-line therapy. The treatment was generally well tolerated and patients experienced longer periods without cancer progression (median: 13.8 months) and longer overall survival (median: 29.1 months) than commonly reported for similar patients. While studies using control groups will need to confirm that Iressa is indeed more effective than standard chemotherapy or a placebo, these findings suggest that Iressa may be a preferable first-line treatment in elderly patients with advanced EGFR-mutant NSCLC.

Research paper: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12032-012-0450-2/fulltext.html


Genetic Variation in P53 May Contribute to Lung Cancer Risk

A study of individuals with and without lung cancer in North India found that those carrying a particular version (or “polymorphism”) of a gene for the protein p53 were more likely to have lung cancer, independent of their age or smoking rate. P53 belongs to a class of proteins called “tumor suppressor proteins,” and is involved in DNA repair, regulating cell growth, and inducing cell death in damaged or abnormal cells. The findings suggest that this version of the p53 gene, called Arg72Pro, may contribute to higher susceptibility for lung cancer, at least in the North Indian population.

Research paper: http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/dna.2012.1792


Abraxane-Paraplatin Combination May Be Safe and Effective in Elderly Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer

A recent study examined first-line treatment with the chemotherapy agent carboplatin (Paraplatin), combined with either albumin-bound paclitaxel (Abraxane) or standard solvent-based paclitaxel (Taxol), in both elderly and younger patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients treated with Abraxane/Paraplatin exhibited higher treatment response rates and fewer toxic side effects in both age groups; elderly patients (age 70+ years) experienced longer periods without cancer progression and longer overall survival with Abraxane/Paraplatin compared to Taxol/Paraplatin treatment. Abraxane plus Paraplatin may constitute a safe, effective first-line treatment for elderly patients with advanced NSCLC, a group that has been traditionally undertreated.

Research paper: http://annonc.oxfordjournals.org/content/24/2/314.long