Breast Cancer Patients with Dense Breast Tissue More Likely to Develop Contralateral Disease

Excerpt:

“Breast cancer patients with dense breast tissue have almost a two-fold increased risk of developing disease in the contralateral breast, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer.

“The study, published in the journal Cancer, is among the first to find the association between breast density (BD) and contralateral breast cancer (CBC).

“According to study author Isabelle Bedrosian, M.D., a big challenge in the management of this patient population, especially as they are making surgical decisions, is trying to counsel women appropriately on their risk of developing breast cancer in the other breast.”

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Tamoxifen Linked to Reduced Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk

Excerpt:

“Use of tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors during and after breast cancer treatment were found to reduce the risk of contralateral breast cancer in a community healthcare setting, according to a study published in JAMA Oncology.

“The authors of the real-world retrospective study found that among estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients who survived at least 5 years, tamoxifen use for 4 years or more prevented an estimated three contralateral breast cancer cases for every 100 women by year 10. This absolute risk reduction is consistent with prior results from tamoxifen clinical trials, according to study authors led by Gretchen L. Gierach, PhD, MPH, of the division of cancer epidemiology and genetics at the National Cancer Institute.”

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Early First Cancer in BRCA1/2 Ups Risk in Opposite Breast

“BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have increased risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC), with age at first diagnosis a significant predictor of CBC risk, according to a study published online Dec. 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“Alexandra J. van den Broek, from the Netherlands Cancer Institute in Amsterdam, and colleagues examined overall and age-specific estimates of CBC risk for young patients with breast cancer with or without BRCA1/2 mutations. Data were included for 6,294 patients with invasive breast cancer diagnosed under 50 years of age and treated between 1970 and 2003; participants were tested for the most prevalent BRCA1/2 mutations.”