Genetic Test Firm to Put Customers’ Data in Public Domain

“In an unusual move, a leading genetic testing company is putting genetic information from the people it has tested into the public domain, a move the company says could make a large trove of data available to researchers looking for genes linked to various diseases.

“The company, Ambry Genetics, is expected to announce on Tuesday that it will put information from 10,000 of its customers into a publicly available database called AmbryShare.

“ ‘We’re going to discover a lot of new diagnostic targets and a lot of new drug targets,’ Aaron Elliott, interim chief scientific officer at Ambry, which is based in Southern California, said in an interview. ‘With our volume, we can pull out a significant number of genes just by the sheer number we are looking at.’ “


Despite FDA Act, Cancer Drug Trial Results Often Not Published

Passed in 2007, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act included a provision requiring the publishing of all clinical trials for cancer drugs performed in the U.S. However, an examination of online public records and journals revealed that nearly half of phase II, phase III, and phase IV clinical trial data have not been made available to the public. The researchers found 646 clinical trials in an online registry with completion dates between December 26, 2007, and May 31, 2010. But one year after completion, just 9% of clinical trial results had been posted at ClinicalTrials.gov, and only 12% had been posted in online journals (20% total availability). Three years after completion, 31% of clinical trial data had been posted on ClinicalTrials.gov and 35% had been posted in journals, with 55% available via both sources. The researchers called for better reporting of clinical trial data, as it could have an impact on patient treatment and safety.


Despite FDA Act, Cancer Drug Trial Results Often Not Published

Passed in 2007, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act included a provision requiring the publishing of all clinical trials for cancer drugs performed in the U.S. However, an examination of online public records and journals revealed that nearly half of phase II, phase III, and phase IV clinical trial data have not been made available to the public. The researchers found 646 clinical trials in an online registry with completion dates between December 26, 2007, and May 31, 2010. But one year after completion, just 9% of clinical trial results had been posted at ClinicalTrials.gov, and only 12% had been posted in online journals (20% total availability). Three years after completion, 31% of clinical trial data had been posted on ClinicalTrials.gov and 35% had been posted in journals, with 55% available via both sources. The researchers called for better reporting of clinical trial data, as it could have an impact on patient treatment and safety.


Despite FDA Act, Cancer Drug Trial Results Often Not Published

Passed in 2007, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act included a provision requiring the publishing of all clinical trials for cancer drugs performed in the U.S. However, an examination of online public records and journals revealed that nearly half of phase II, phase III, and phase IV clinical trial data have not been made available to the public. The researchers found 646 clinical trials in an online registry with completion dates between December 26, 2007, and May 31, 2010. But one year after completion, just 9% of clinical trial results had been posted at ClinicalTrials.gov, and only 12% had been posted in online journals (20% total availability). Three years after completion, 31% of clinical trial data had been posted on ClinicalTrials.gov and 35% had been posted in journals, with 55% available via both sources. The researchers called for better reporting of clinical trial data, as it could have an impact on patient treatment and safety.