Most Melanomas Don’t Arise From Existing Moles, Study Shows

Excerpt:

“As the summer draws to a close, it’s time to start putting away flip-flops, bathing suits and beach bags. But as the seasonal supplies disappear into the back of the closet, sunscreen should stay within arm’s reach for year-round protection against the sun’s ultraviolet rays.

“Because exposure to those harmful UV rays can increase one’s risk of skin cancer — and people spend a lot of time in the sun during the summer — the end of the season is also a good time to perform a skin self-exam. While it’s important to look for any suspicious spots on the skin, research published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology indicates that it’s vital to check for new growths in order to detect melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.”

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Combined Urine Test for T2:ERG, PCA3 Ups Prostate CA Detection

Excerpt:

“Testing for combined urinary PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG (T2:ERG) RNA can improve detection of prostate cancer, according to a study published online May 18 in JAMA Oncology.

“Martin G. Sanda, M.D., from the Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, and colleagues conducted a multicenter diagnostic evaluation and validation in academic and community-based ambulatory urology clinics. A sample of men presenting for first-time without preexisting prostate cancer were enrolled: 516 in the developmental cohort and 561 in the validation cohort. Urinary PCA3 and T2:ERG RNA were measured before prostate biopsy.”

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Discuss Prostate Screening With Your Doctor, Experts Now Say

Excerpt:

“Older men should talk to their doctors about the pros and cons of prostate cancer screening and make an individual decision that is right for them, an influential national panel of experts has proposed.

“The new recommendation, based on new data from a European trial as well as changes in the way men with prostate cancer are treated, modifies an earlier panel guideline from 2012 that advised men to skip prostate cancer screenings altogether. Screening is typically done using a blood test that measures levels of a protein released by the prostate gland called prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, which may indicate the presence of prostate cancer when elevated. But increased levels can also be caused by less serious medical conditions, like inflammation.”

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The Downside of Breast Cancer Screening

Excerpt:

“A 17-year study has concluded that screening mammography — in which all women in certain age groups are routinely screened for breast cancer — does not reduce the incidence of advanced tumors, but does increase the diagnosis of lesions that would never have led to health problems.

“In Denmark, screening was implemented in different regions at different times, so researchers there were able to compare groups of women who were screened with those who were not.”

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6 Kinds Of Breast Lumps That Aren't Cancer

Excerpt:

“In January, I found a grape-sized lump in my left breast. It wasn’t brought to my attention at the gyno’s office, but rather during a mundane and medically irrelevant event: a hug.

“As my boyfriend and I stood on the subway platform, he pulled me into a tight squeeze, and in that normal gesture, I felt an abnormal pang of pain on the left side of my chest. I shifted my stance to see if maybe it was a ‘bad angle’ — but nope, that spot was tender no matter what direction the pressure came from.

“When I got home, I did a more thorough exam of the area, tracing my breast until I came across a small lump at the tender spot. Then, I did what any modern hypochondriac would do: I burst into tears and hopped online for a diagnosis.”

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Finding Skin Cancer in a Flash

Excerpt:

“The typical nude skin cancer checks with long photo sessions at your dermatologist’s office to track any suspicious skin marks just got a lot more accurate, while reducing the chance of unnecessary biopsies.

“UConn Health is the only institution to date in Connecticut to offer the latest advanced smart technology that hunts for  and keeps an eye on changing moles.

“An integrated body-scanning camera and smart software technology “helps us find skin cancer in a flash,” says Dr. Jane Grant-Kels, professor and vice chair of UConn Health’s Department of Dermatology and director of the UConn Cutaneous Oncology Center and Melanoma Program.”

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Increasing the Odds of Prostate Cancer Detection

Excerpt:

“For three years, Andrew Harder wondered if he had prostate cancer. In 2009, he had routine blood work that revealed an elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. When PSA is above 4 nanograms per milliliter of blood, it can be one of the first signs of a prostate tumor. Harder’s PSA was 9.

“By the time Harder saw a urologist, it had skyrocketed to 20. His doctor recommended the traditional next step: a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsy, which involves taking random tissue samples from 12 cross sections of the prostate.

“Over the course of two years, Harder, 60, an MRI technologist, would have three TRUS biopsies. They were all inconclusive.”

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Breast Cancer Blood Test Now Accessible Under Health Benefits for Millions of Women in the U.S.

Excerpt:

“Provista Diagnostics, a private company developing and commercializing protein-based diagnostic, prognostic and monitoring tests for cancers affecting women, today announced the signing of 13 agreements with Third Party Administrator (TPA) Networks for coverage of Videssa® Breast.

“Videssa Breast is the first protein-based blood test that can improve the accuracy of early breast cancer detection. These agreements with TPA Networks will expand patient access to Videssa Breast at a reduced cost and ensure optimal reimbursement for the test. TPA Networks are organizations that process insurance claims and specific aspects of employee benefit plans. In addition, they are networks of providers who are contracted to provide healthcare services to plan members.”

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FDA Approves Axumin to Detect Recurrent Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“The FDA today approved Axumin, an injectable radioactive diagnostic agent used to detect recurrent prostate cancer.

“The agent is indicated for PET imaging in men who have suspected prostate cancer recurrence based on elevated PSA levels following treatment.

“The FDA based its decision on results of two studies that evaluated the safety and efficacy of Axumin (Blue Earth Diagnostics). One study compared 105 Axumin scans to histopathology obtained by prostate biopsy and by biopsies of suspicious imaged lesions in men suspected of having prostate cancer recurrence. In the second study, researchers evaluated 96 Axumin scans with C11 choline scans in patients with a median PSA of 1.44 ng/mL.”

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