Metformin Use Does Not Increase Prostate Cancer Survival

Excerpt:

“Metformin use in combination with docetaxel chemotherapy does not significantly improve survival in patients with diabetes and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, according to a study published in the April issue of The Journal of Urology.

“Michelle J. Mayer, from Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, and colleagues used data from several Ontario administrative health care databases to identify men (older than 65 years) diagnosed with metastatic castration-resistant cancer and treated with docetaxel. Patients were stratified into groups based on diabetes status and use of antidiabetic medications to assess the effect of use with docetaxel on survival.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Women with Diabetes More Likely to Be Diagnosed with Advanced Stage Breast Cancer

“Dabetes is associated with more advanced stage breast cancer, according to a new study by the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and Women’s College Hospital.

“The findings, published in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, confirm a strong link between diabetes and later stage breast cancer at diagnosis for Canadian women.

” ‘Our findings suggest that women with diabetes may be predisposed to more advanced stage breast cancer, which may be a contributor to their higher cancer mortality,’ said Dr. Lorraine Lipscombe, a scientist at ICES and Women’s College Research Institute.

“In the study, Dr. Lipscombe examined stage at diagnosis among women aged 20-105 years who were newly diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 2007 and 2012.

“From an analysis of more than 38,000 women with breast cancer, 6,115 (15.9 per cent) of the women had diabetes. Breast cancer patients with diabetes were significantly more likely to present with advanced stage breast cancer than those without diabetes. Women with diabetes were 14 per cent more likely to present with Stage II breast cancer, 21 per cent more likely to present with Stage III breast cancer, and 16 per cent more likely to present with Stage IV than to present with Stage I. The results also show lower mammogram rates in women with diabetes, which could account for later stage disease. Women with diabetes also had a higher risk of lymph node metastases (spreading of the cancer) and larger tumors than women without diabetes.”


Effect of Metformin on RCC Survival Warrants Further Study

Editor’s note: This article is about a research study that looked at the effects of taking the anti-diabetes drug metformin before surgery for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The researchers found that metformin might improve patients’ survival times. However, more research is needed to see whether metformin is truly beneficial.

“Patient exposure to metformin before undergoing nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) may have an effect on patient survival, according to the results of a study published recently in Urologic Oncology.

“Results of the study showed a positive effect of the anti-diabetes drug in an unadjusted analysis; however, this effect was not seen on multivariable analysis.

“ ‘Interest in metformin as a possible therapeutic option for RCC has been generated by emerging data from both observation and prospective studies assessing the association between risk of cancer-related death and exposure to metformin for a variety of malignancies,’ wrote Sarah P. Psutka, MD, of the department of urology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., and colleagues.”


Older, Sicker Men with Early-Stage Prostate Cancer Do Not Benefit from Aggressive Treatment

“Treating older men with early-stage prostate cancer who also have other serious underlying health problems with aggressive therapies such as surgery or radiation therapy does not help them live longer and, in fact, can be detrimental, according to a study by UCLA researchers.

“The study followed the cases of more than 140,500 men aged 66 and older diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer between 1991 and 2007 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Medicare database. Men who also suffered from multiple major medical conditions such as a history of heart attack, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and diabetes in combination did not live any longer after receiving aggressive therapy compared with men receiving no treatment. Additionally, these men were at risk for side effects such as impotence, urinary incontinence and bowel problems that can result from surgery and radiation treatments.”


Prolonged Hormone Therapy Exposure Increases Risk of Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease in Older Patients With Prostate Cancer

“Although androgen deprivation therapy extends survival in men with prostate cancer, its use is associated with unwanted side effects. In addition to the well-known side effects of impaired sexual function and hot flashes, prolonged exposure to androgen deprivation therapy can also lead to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The question is, which patients are at risk for these adverse events?

“A new study presented at the 2014 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium found that over a 15-year period, the odds of developing diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease were greater in older men treated with more than 2 years of androgen deprivation therapy, especially in men with comorbidities, while younger men had no increased risk of developing diabetes or cardiovascular disease even with prolonged androgen deprivation therapy (Abstract 31).”


Glucophage Linked to Improved Survival for Cancer Patients with Diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes are at higher risk of several cancers. However, patients taking the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) have a lower risk of developing some kinds of cancer. Now, a review of several studies suggests that Glucophage also improves survival rates for patients who already have cancer. Patients with cancer and diabetes who took Glucophage had a lower risk of death overall, and of dying of cancer specifically, compared to patients receiving other diabetes medications. It is not certain that Glucophage indeed caused the survival benefit. Separate, independent factors could make patients both more likely to be prescribed Glucophage and to have better survival. However, because there is at least a strong possibility of a benefit, the review authors recommend Glucophage as the drug of choice for diabetes patients with cancer.


Glucophage Linked to Improved Survival for Cancer Patients with Diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes are at higher risk of several cancers. However, patients taking the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) have a lower risk of developing some kinds of cancer. Now, a review of several studies suggests that Glucophage also improves survival rates for patients who already have cancer. Patients with cancer and diabetes who took Glucophage had a lower risk of death overall, and of dying of cancer specifically, compared to patients receiving other diabetes medications. It is not certain that Glucophage indeed caused the survival benefit. Separate, independent factors could make patients both more likely to be prescribed Glucophage and to have better survival. However, because there is at least a strong possibility of a benefit, the review authors recommend Glucophage as the drug of choice for diabetes patients with cancer.


Glucophage Linked to Improved Survival for Cancer Patients with Diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes are at higher risk of several cancers. However, patients taking the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) have a lower risk of developing some kinds of cancer. Now, a review of several studies suggests that Glucophage also improves survival rates for patients who already have cancer. Patients with cancer and diabetes who took Glucophage had a lower risk of death overall, and of dying of cancer specifically, compared to patients receiving other diabetes medications. It is not certain that Glucophage indeed caused the survival benefit. Separate, independent factors could make patients both more likely to be prescribed Glucophage and to have better survival. However, because there is at least a strong possibility of a benefit, the review authors recommend Glucophage as the drug of choice for diabetes patients with cancer.


Crowdsourcing to Be Used in Metformin Prostate Cancer Trial

Transparency Life Sciences (TLS), along with Matthew Galsky, M.D., associate professor of medicine in the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will be designing and conducting a pilot trial assessing the diabetes drug metformin as a potential treatment for prostate cancer. This collaboration will also test using crowdsourcing to obtain input to the design of the clinical protocol, and telemonitoring to replace most patient site visits. TLS will be partnering with AMC Health, a provider of telehealth services, to conduct the metformin study.”